Synonyms for agse or Related words with agse

agte              gese              snse              snte              aggete              zrte              zrse              zngete              znsip              cugas              cuges              aggase              cefe              snsse              hfse              aggese              cdgeas              agins              znsias              mnte              agsbte              assse              cugase              cuins              agges              znsns              agbr              gesete              zngep              cugete              fese              znsb              znsnsb              gesesn              cdgep              cdsnas              teteo              snpt              aggas              insbse              agalse              bisb              gasetege              cacn              cosb              zncds              aginse              cuznsns              znsnp              znsnas             



Examples of "agse"
2009 - AGSE acquires Stanley Aviation from Eaton Corporation.
All local units are single sex, despite the association as whole being mixed. The AGSE runs about 25 Sea Scout units and around 20 Lake Scout units.
The crystal structure for chrisstanleyite has two different polyhedra structures that intersect and support each other, which is the same as jagueite. An AgSe (or CuSe) tetrahedral creates a grooved (100) layer that are grouped in dimers of AgSe, which share four vertices with adjacent dimers. Oriented alternatively above and below the layer are the two remaining vertices for each tetrahedron, resulting in the corrugation of the silver-based layer as well the sharing of Se atoms with Pd polyhedra (Topa et al. 2006).
Silver selenide (AgSe) is the reaction product formed when selenium toning analog silver gelatine photo papers in photographic print toning. The selenium toner contains sodium selenite (NaSeO) as one of its active ingredients, which is the source of the selenide (Se) anion combining with the silver in the toning process.
The Association des Guides et Scouts d'Europe (AGSE, "Association of the Guides and Scouts of Europe") is a Roman Catholic Scouting and Guiding organization in France. It was founded in 1958 and serves about 26,600 members. The organization was a founding member of the Union Internationale des Guides et Scouts d'Europe and the Conférence Française de Scoutisme.
Silver selenide normally exists in the orthorhombic β-phase but at temperatures above 130 °C transforms into the cubic α-AgSe (Space group Im-3m, No. 229, Pearson symbol cI20). The phase transition increases ionic conductivity by 10,000 times to about 2 S/cm
Although the electronic structural transitions relevant to both optical discs and PC-RAM were featured strongly, contributions from ions were not considered—even though amorphous chalcogenides can have significant ionic conductivities. At Euromat 2005, however, it was shown that ionic transport can also be useful for data storage in a solid chalcogenide electrolyte. At the nanoscale, this electrolyte consists of crystalline metallic islands of silver selenide (AgSe) dispersed in an amorphous semiconducting matrix of germanium selenide (GeSe).
To understand entrepreneurship and leadership, Dr Dave Robinson has integrated Beck and Cowan (Graves' theories) with ethics and organizational psychology models to create the Personal and Corporate Values Journey 'PCVJ' diagram (1998). After several decades of research, Robinson goes further in his phenomenological approach to tie it to several other cultural, business, and logical paradigms (mainly within entrepreneurial business environs) and suggests leadership tools for communication and growth of subordinates and self, linking heavily to Gravesian interpretations. The PCVJ was first presented academically at the 2007 AGSE conference .
In March 1977, General Louis H. Wilson, the 26th Commandant of the Marine Corps, activated the Expeditionary Airfield (EAF). The initial unit placed in charge of the EAF was designated Detachment MABS-11. Two years later, in July 1979, Detachment MABS-11 became operationally attached to Marine Aircraft Group 16 and was redesignated MAG-16, Detachment Bravo in 1982. Originally, only a cadre of Marines provided caretaker support for the EAF between exercises. However, during October 1988 MWSS-173 was transferred from Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay to the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms in support of the EAF. On 4 March 1993, MWSS-173 was deactivated and Aviation Ground Support Element (AGSE) was activated to continue operating and maintaining the EAF. On 1 April 1999, AGSE deactivated and was redesignated as Marine Wing Support Squadron-374. Currently the squadron is nearly 525 strong, and possesses the ability to operate a portable and tactical airfield including and maintaining ground support equipment for aircraft.
The history of the Expeditionary Airfield (EAF) and its supporting units is closely interwoven. In March 1977, General Louis H. Wilson, the 26th Commandant of the Marine Corps, activated the EAF. The initial unit placed in charge of the EAF was designated Detachment MABS-11. Two years later, in July 1979, Detachment MABS-11 became operationally attached to Marine Wing Support Group 37 (MWSG-37) and was redesignated MWSG-37, Detachment Bravo in 1982. Originally, only a cadre of Marines provided caretaker support for the EAF between exercises. However, during October 1988 MWSS-173 was transferred from MCAS Kaneohe Bay to the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms in support of the EAF. On 4 March 1993, MWSS-173 was deactivated and Aviation Ground Support Element (AGSE) was activated to continue operating and maintaining the EAF. On 1 April 1999, AGSE deactivated and was redesignated as Marine Wing Support Squadron-374 (MWSS-374). Currently the squadron is over 700 strong, and possesses the ability to operate a tactical airfield including air traffic control services and maintaining ground and weapons support equipment for aircraft.
In 2006 de Jong received the Ernst and Young Australian Social Entrepreneur of the Year Award for her work with The Song Room charity. De Jong's other awards include the "Outstanding Individual Contribution to Australian Culture" (1998) and the Accessibility Award in The Melbourne Awards (2005). She was a finalist in the Telstra Business Women’s Awards (2001) and studied overseas on a Churchill Fellowship in (1996). She has recently been inducted into the AGSE Entrepreneurs Hall of Fame at Swinburne University. De Jong was named Brainlink Woman of Achievement 2009. She was a runner-up in the Westpac Community Leader Awards in 2013. Creativity Australia was named one of Australia’s top social innovations in Anthill’s Smart 100 for the second year in a row.
Chrisstanleyite was identified in a second deposit, a dolomite-rich assemblage in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Within the assemblage included a homogeneous fine-grained layer of malachite, quartz, and goethite along with heterogeneous grouping of dark nodules and masses in a malachite-quartz matrix. A group of selenides were found in these masses and include berzelianite CuSe, umangite CuS, naumannite AgSe, oosterboschite (Pd, Cu)Se, luberoite PtSe, chrisstanleyite, and, at the time, the unknown jagueite (Nickel 2002; Paar et al. 2004). Native silver, gold, unidentified palladium and platinum oxides, and several other minerals were identified as well. A similar ore deposit was found in Northern Australia and had had microthermometry and low-temperature laser Raman spectroscopy utilized in this assemblage. The results showed the minerals came from an acidic, high saline hydrothermal solution at temperatures of 140°C. The interaction of hydrothermal fluids with feldspathic rocks precipitated the ore minerals (Nickel 2002).
Among several solid electrolytes described in the 19th and early 20th century, α-AgI, the high-temperature crystalline form of silver iodide, is widely regarded as the most important one. Its electrical conduction was characterized by Carl Tubandt and E. Lorenz in 1914. Their comparative study of AgI, AgCl and AgBr demonstrated that α-AgI, is thermally stable and highly conductive between 147 and 555 °C; the conductivity weakly increased with temperature in this range and then dropped upon melting. This behavior was fully reversible and excluded non-equilibrium effects. Tubandt and Lorenz described other materials with a similar behavior, such as α-CuI, α-CuBr, β-CuBr, and high-temperature phases of AgS, AgSe and AgTe. They associated the conductivity with cations in silver and cuprous halides and with ions and electrons in silver chalcogenides.
Prof Swarup has been a Fulbright Visitor to the United States in 2004 and is an expert on Strategic Studies, Finance, Management and Environment. He holds a Doctorate in Science, distinguished University Medals for first position in Master of Science and Master of Philosophy as also a Master of Science in DSSC Wellington, University of Madras and an MBA (Finance & Strategy) from the AGSE, Swinburne University. A National Science Talent Scholar (1975), Junior Research Fellow, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (1980) and University Grants Commission Senior Fellow (1981). He has been a patron of Melbourne School of Knowledge Management and co-founder of "Himsa Mukt Bharat Andolan" (a movement for nonviolence and against all conflicts) and founder of "Sambhav Nasha Mukti Abhiyan" (a voluntary coalition for a drug-free society and de-addiction campaigns) in the State of Rajasthan. He has held various key positions as a Member of Indian Revenue Service since 1985 such as Commissioner/ Director in the Ministry of Finance, Government of India.