Synonyms for aksumite or Related words with aksumite

axumite              sassanian              sasanid              aksum              parthian              himyarite              kushan              sasanian              kushite              sassanid              palmyrene              kassite              urartian              nabatean              nabataean              achaemenid              kassites              seleucid              mauryan              qatna              makuria              mitanni              hephthalite              hasmonean              funan              meroitic              zagwe              kushans              yamhad              elamite              visigoth              nobatia              achaemenian              amorite              arsacid              ghassanid              licchavi              aramaean              maitraka              elymais              dardanian              hyksos              ajuran              karakhanid              elamites              kidarite              hafsid              severan              hittites              seljuq             



Examples of "aksumite"
Hawulti, a pre-Aksumite or early Aksumite era obelisk, is situated here.
Hawulti-Melazo is an Aksumite and pre-Aksumite archaeological site in Tigray Region, northern Ethiopia.
The Hawulti is a pre-Aksumite or early Aksumite period obelisk located in Matara, Eritrea. It bears the oldest known example of the ancient Ge'ez script (also known as "Old Ethiopic").
Dar'a is an area in the eastern Tigray Region of northern Ethiopia. The city of `Addi Galamo, where many pre-Aksumite D`mt and Aksumite artifacts have been found is located in Dar'a.
The Battle of Hadhramaut took place between the armies of the Sassanid Empire under the command of Spahbed Vahrez and Aksumite forces under King Masruq in 570. The Aksumite army was defeated by the Sassanids and Masruq was killed.
The conception of an Ethiopian nation by Ethiopian nationalists is stated to have begun with the Aksumite Kingdom in the 4th century A.D. The Aksumite Kingdom was a predominantly Christian state that at the height of its power controlled what is now the Ethiopian Highlands, Eritrea and the coastal regions of Southern Arabia. The Aksumite Kingdom was responsible for the development of the religious movement that became the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church. However the expansion of Islam in the 7th century caused the decline of the Aksumite Kingdom and most of the lowland populations converted to Islam while the highland people remained Christian. Since the Aksumite people became divided between Christian highlands and Islamic lowlands, religious and tribal tensions and rivalries between the people intensified. The Aksumite society changed into a loose confederation of city states that maintained the language of Aksum.
The Aksumite ruins of Adulis are situated about to the east.
GDRT was most likely the first Aksumite king to be involved in South Arabian affairs, as well as the first known king to be mentioned in South Arabian inscriptions. His reign resulted in the control of much of western Yemen, such as the Tihāmah, Najrā, Ma`afir, Ẓafār (until c. 230), and parts of Hashid territory around Hamir in the northern highlands. Furthermore, GDRT's military alliances and his conquests in Yemen and Saudi Arabia, the required formidable fleet for such feats, and the extension of Aksumite influence throughout Yemen and southern Saudi Arabia all reflect a new zenith in Aksumite power. His involvement would mark the beginning of centuries of Aksumite involvement in South Arabia, culminating with the full-scale invasion of Yemen by King Kaleb in 520 (or 525), resulting in the establishment of an Aksumite province covering all of South Arabia.
The Siege of Sana'a took place when the Sassanids under Spahbed Vahrez besieged the Aksumite city of Sana'a in 570.
The kingdom of Kush maintained its status as a regional power until its conquest by the Aksumite Empire in 350.
Pedersen, R. "The Byzantine-Aksumite Period Shipwreck at Black Assarca Island, Eritrea." Azania (2008)XLIII: 77-94.
The kingdom is mentioned in the "Periplus of the Erythraean Sea" as an important market place for ivory, which was exported throughout the ancient world. Aksum was at the time ruled by Zoskales, who also governed the port of Adulis. The Aksumite rulers facilitated trade by minting their own Aksumite currency.
Local landmarks in this woreda includes Mai Adrasha, an archeological site showing an uninterrupted chronological range from the Pre-Aksumite through the Late Aksumite periods (c. 800 BC - AD 700) - an indication of the site's importance both as a long-lived habitation in the area, and as the westernmost known example of this chronological range.
The Aksumite kings had the official title ነገሠ ፡ ነገሠተ "ngś ngśt" - King of Kings (later vocalization Ge'ez ንጉሠ ፡ ነገሥት "nigūśa nagaśt", Modern Ethiosemitic "nigūse negest").
The Aksumites produced coins around 270 CE, under the rule of King Endubis. Aksumite coins were issued in gold, silver, and bronze.
The Kingdom of Aksum or Axum, also known as the Aksumite Empire, was a Habasha trading nation in the modern-day area of Eritrea and the Tigray region of Ethiopia. It existed from approximately 100–940 AD. It grew from the proto-Aksumite Iron Age period c. 4th century BC to achieve prominence by the 1st century AD, and was a major player in the commercial route between the Roman Empire and Ancient India. The Aksumite rulers facilitated trade by minting their own Aksumite currency, the state established its hegemony over the declining Kingdom of Kush and regularly entered the politics of the kingdoms on the Arabian Peninsula, eventually extending its rule over the region with the conquest of the Himyarite Kingdom. The Persian Prophet Mani regarded Axum as one of the four great powers of his time, with the other three being Persia, Rome, and China.
Most structures, however, like palaces, villas, commoner's houses, and other churches and monasteries, were built of alternating layers of stone and wood. The protruding wooden support beams in these structures have been named "monkey heads" and are a staple of Aksumite architecture and a mark of Aksumite influence in later structures. Some examples of this style had whitewashed exteriors and/or interiors, such as the medieval 12th-century monastery of Yemrehanna Krestos near Lalibela, built during the Zagwe dynasty in Aksumite style. Contemporary houses were one-room stone structures, or two-storey square houses, or roundhouses of sandstone with basalt foundations. Villas were generally two to four storeys tall and built on sprawling rectangular plans (cf. Dungur ruins). A good example of still-standing Aksumite architecture is the monastery of Debre Damo from the 6th century.
The Aksumite Empire was an important trading nation originating from Eritrea and Ethiopia in northeastern Africa, growing from the proto-Aksumite period ca. 4th century BC to achieve prominence by the 1st century AD. It was a major player in the commerce between the Roman Empire and Ancient India and the Aksumite rulers facilitated trade by minting their own currency. The state established its hegemony over the declining Kingdom of Kush and regularly entered the politics of the kingdoms on the Arabian peninsula, and would eventually extend its rule over the region with the conquest of the Himyarite Kingdom.
Most structures, however, like palaces, villas, commoner's houses, and other churches and monasteries, were built of alternating layers of stone and wood. The protruding wooden support beams in these structures have been named "monkey heads" and are a staple of Aksumite architecture and a mark of Aksumite influence in later structures. Some examples of this style had whitewashed exteriors and/or interiors, such as the medieval 12th-century monastery of Yemrehanna Krestos near Lalibela, built during the Zagwe dynasty in Aksumite style. Contemporary houses were one-room stone structures or two-storey square houses or roundhouses of sandstone with basalt foundations. Villas were generally two to four stories tall and built on sprawling rectangular plans (cf. Dungur ruins). A good example of still-standing Aksumite architecture is the monastery of Debre Damo from the 6th century.
Farther afield, lie the monastery of Ashetan Maryam and Yimrehane Kristos Church, (possibly eleventh century, built in the Aksumite fashion, but within a cave).