Synonyms for al_mughayyir or Related words with al_mughayyir

al_lubban_ash_sharqiya              jabalia              qarawat_bani_hassan              village_profile_arij              tulkarem              baqat              beit_ummar              qabalan              asira_al_qibliya              turmus_ayya              sur_baher              salfit              hizma              halhul              al_bireh              iskaka              salfit_governorate              idnibba              az_zawiya              beit_furik              qalqilya              yasuf              abu_shusha              al_hatab              yazur              beit_awwa              deir_dibwan              qalqilya_governorate              qabatiya              yasid              beit_jala              nahalin              surif              sinjil              mhaydseh              silwan              jalud              ad_dhahiriya              tarbikha              fandaqumiya              kafr_aqab              zayta              jenin_governorate              beit_rima              jilya              qazaza              jinsafut              sharqiya              bureij              daraghmeh             



Examples of "al_mughayyir"
After the Six-Day War in 1967, Al-Mughayyir has been under Israeli occupation.
In the wake of the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, and after the 1949 Armistice Agreements, Al-Mughayyir came under Jordanian rule.
According to "The Economist" in October 2009, 200 olive trees belonging to villagers from Al-Mughayyir, Ramallah (Al Mughayyir), were felled by settlers from the illegal settler outpost at Adei Ad, near Shvut Rachel. October is harvest time for olives and is often a time of "tension between Palestinian farmers and Jewish settlers", and "The Economist" tied the destruction of trees to the settlers' 'price tag policy.
Khirbet Abu Falah is situated in a hilly area in the central highlands of the West Bank and has an average elevation of 743 meters above sea level. It is located 15.7 kilometers northeast of Ramallah. The nearest localities are al-Mazraa al-Sharqiyah to the southwest, Turmus Ayya to the north, al-Mughayyir to the east and Kafr Malik to the south.
Khirbet Awad (; also spelled "Khirbet Awwad") is a village in southern Syria, administratively part of the Salkhad District of the al-Suwayda Governorate. It straddles Syria's border with Jordan. The closest localities are al-Mughayyir to the northwest and Annat to the northeast. In the 2004 census it had a population of 398. Its inhabitants are Druze.
al-Mughayyir () is a Palestinian village in the West Bank, located 12 km Southeast of the city of Jenin in the northern West Bank. According to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics, the village had a population of 2,240 inhabitants in mid-year 2006.
In 1998, a village council was established to administer Khirbet Abu Falah's civil affair. The council has nine members appointed by the Palestinian National Authority. The council is also included in the Joint Services Council, which is a cooperative board that also includes the villages of al-Mazraa al-Sharqiya, Kafr Malik and al-Mughayyir.
al-Mughayyir () is a Palestinian village in the Ramallah and al-Bireh Governorate, located 27 kilometers Northeast of Ramallah and 34 kilometers Southeast of Nablus, in the northern West Bank. According to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS), the village had a population of 2,368 inhabitants in 2007. According to villagers 75% of its land has been confiscated for Israeli settlements, military bases and natural reserves.
Situated on an isolated "tell" in the Zababdeh Valley, Telfit has an elevation of 390 meters above sea level. Nearby localities include Kufeir to the south, Zababdeh to the southwest, Qabatiya to the west, Umm at-Tut to the north, Jalqamus and al-Mughayyir to the northeast and Raba to the southeast. The principal water source is Ein Ginai, 6 kilometers to the west and there are 35 cisterns in the village. In 1980 Telfit's built-up area consisted of 15 dunams.
On 12 November 2014, the Al-Mughayyir mosque was damaged extensively when it was torched, reportedly by settlers in what was believed to be a price-tag attack. Israeli police say the incident does not match previous ‘price tag’ attacks, and that a full investigation was impossible because they were denied entry to the village by Palestinian authorities. According to Haaretz journalist Chaim Levinson, it was the tenth such mosque subject to arson in Israel and the West Bank since June 2011, and no investigation has ever led to an indictment.
On 12 November, the Al-Mughayyir mosque in the Ramallah and al-Bireh Governorate was damaged extensively when it was torched, reportedly by settlers in what was believed to be a price-tag attack. Israeli police say the incident does not match previous ‘price tag’ attacks, and that a full investigation was impossible because they were denied entry to the village by Palestinian authorities. According to Haaretz journalist Chaim Levinson, it was the 10th such mosque subject to arson in Israel and the West Bank since June 2011, and no investigation has ever led to an indictment. Settler violence has impeded Palestinians from visiting holy sites and worshipping at their mosques, and have interfered with muezzin calls for daily prayer.
in September 1995, Al Mughayyir village was divided into politically classified area 'B' and area 'C'. Approximately 1,934 dunums (5.9% of the village's total area) is classified as area B, where the Palestinian National Authority has complete control over civil matters and Israel continues to have overriding responsibility for security. Area B constitutes most of all inhabited Palestinian areas, including municipalities, villages and some refugee camps. The majority of the village's population resides in area B which forms a small part compared to the village's total area. The rest of the village's area, constituting 31,121 dunums (94.1% of the total area) is classified as area C, where Israel retains full control over security and administration related to the territory. In area C, Palestinian building and land management is prohibited unless through consent or authorization by the Israeli Civil Administration. Most of the lands lying within the area C are agricultural areas and open spaces, in addition to Israeli military camps.