Synonyms for al_qastal or Related words with al_qastal

bayt_jibrin              yibna              majdal              abu_shusha              burayr              jabalia              azzun              safsaf              sur_baher              qaqun              al_qubayba              bourj_el_barajneh              dayr              deir_el              jezzine              halhul              beit_jala              zeitun              kawkaba              tantura              arraba              bireh              qatra              isdud              khirbat_al              yabrud              qusayr              sharqiya              al_bireh              kafr              silwan              tarbikha              khan_yunis              bayt_nattif              tafas              saraqib              salkhad              al_majdal              ash_sham              yazur              bureij              beit_lahia              aqir              salamiyah              rashaya              lifta              jaramana              tulkarem              daraya              palestinian_refugee_camp             



Examples of "al_qastal"
Textual evidence from the poet Kuthayyir Azza indicates that the complex at Al Qastal was originally built by Caliph Yazid bin Abd al-Malik. The fact that the complex at Al Qastal was finished, while the nearby Qasr Mshatta was never finished indicates that Al Qastal may be the oldest Umayyad construction in the area. Tombstones from Al Qastal indicates that after the fall of the Umayyads the site was used by the Abbasid Caliphate. When the Abbasid Caliphate fell there was a short period when the site was abandoned. later the Mameluke and Ayyubid dynasties re-settled in Al Qastal, leaving behind a number of small buildings.
Mevaseret Zion is located on the former lands of Al-Qastal.
In 1883, al-Qastal was described as "a small stone village in a conspicuous position on a rocky hill-top" with springs to the east.
On 6 April, the Haganah attacked al-Qastal, a village two kilometers north of Deir Yassin, also overlooking the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv road.
Following the attempt to clear the road to Jerusalem, Palmach units "more or less systematically leveled the villages of al-Qastal, Qalinya, Khuda and largely or partly destroyed Beit Surik, Biddu, Shu'fat, Beit Iksa, Beit Mahsir and Sheikh Jarrah (Jerusalem)".
During the British Mandate of Palestine, the British referred to this district as "The Castle". The Arabs called it "al-Qastal", pronouncing the "t." The Jews called it "HaCastel" ("the Castel").
During the British Mandate of Palestine, the British referred to this district as "The Castle", dropping the "t" as is customary in English. The Arabs called it al-Qastal, pronouncing the "t." The Jews called it "Hacastel" ("the Castel").
Al Qastal ()is a town in the Amman Governorate of northern Jordan. Originally established as an Umayyad settlement, it remains the oldest and most complete such settlement in the Near East The remains of the minaret at Qastal is especially important as it is the only one extant from the Umayyad period, making it one of the oldest minarets in the world. Qasr Al Qastal, also located within the town, is considered one of the desert castles and is just 5 km from Qasr Mshatta.
Al-Qastal () is a village in southern Syria, administratively part of the Rif Dimashq Governorate, located on the northeast of Damascus, on the ancient caravan route to Homs and Aleppo, in the Qalamoun Mountains. Nearby localities include Yabroud, an-Nabek, al-Sahel and Deir Atiyah to the north, ar-Ruhaybah, Jayroud, al-Dumayr and al-Qutayfah to the south, and Ma'loula, Assal al-Ward and Hosh Arab to the southwest. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, al-Qastal had a population of 3,486 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Sunni Muslims.
Al-Qastal ("Kastel", ) was a Palestinian village located eight kilometers west of Jerusalem named for a Crusader castle located on the hilltop. Used as a military base by the Army of the Holy War, the village was captured by the Palmach in the lead up to the Arab-Israeli War and depopulated of its residents.
In 1948, al-Qastal was a key position on the Jaffa-Jerusalem road and was used by Arab forces to attack Jewish relief convoys so as to prevent them from reaching the besieged Jewish parts of Jerusalem. For this purpose it was occupied by the Army of the Holy War led by Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, the commander of the Jerusalem Hills sector.
Castel National Park () is an Israeli national park which consists of a fortified summit located at the Judean Mountains, at the site of the former Arab village of Al-Qastal. It is located 8 km west of Jerusalem on the road linking it to Tel Aviv (Highway 1).
According to the 9th-century Arab geographer, Ibn Khordazbeh, during the Abbasid era, Uqayribat was one of the administrative subdistricts of Homs, along with al-Qastal, Salamiyah and Zumayn, all of which were part of the larger district of Jund Hims. It remained an administrative subdistrict of Homs by the 13th century as well.
Near the palace there are two noteworthy sites, a small, rectangular mosque and a cemetery. Attached to the mosque is one of the oldest minarets in the world, known as the Al-Qastal Minaret. The tombs in the cemetery are noteworthy for being oriented facing Jerusalem, as opposed to Mecca.
Al-Qastal was visited by Syrian geographer Yaqut al-Hamawi in the early 13th-century, during Ayyubid rule. He noted that it was "a place between Hims and Damascus where the caravans stop. It is said to be the name of the Kurah (or district)."
Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni was killed during the night of 7–8 April, in the midst of the battles taking place in Al-Qastal. The loss of this charismatic Palestinian leader 'disrupted the Arab strategy and organization in the area of Jerusalem.' His successor, Emil Ghuri, changed tactics: instead of provoking a series of ambushes throughout the route, he had a huge road block erected at Bab al-Wad, and Jerusalem was once again isolated as a consequence.
Born in Rehovot in 1923, Yafeh's family moved to Jerusalem a month after his birth, and were amongst the founders of the Beit HaKerem neighbourhood. One of the leaders of Maccabi Hatzair, in 1936 he joined the Haganah. Between 1942 and 1945 he taught at a high school and the David Yellin College of Education in Beit HaKerem. He also studied humanities at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. During the Siege of Jerusalem in 1948, he fought at al Qastal.
Qasr Al Qastal was an Umayyad palace. The building was approximately 68 meters square. The outer wall of the palace had 12 semi-circular towers at intervals between four large corner towers. The ground floor comprised an entrance hall, courtyard, and six suites of rooms. The upper story contained another set of suites and the palace's audience hall which had a triple apse design. The palace was originally decorated with carvings and mosaics that show similarity to mosaics found at Qasr al Hallabat.
Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni was killed during the night of 7–8 April, in the middle of the battles taking place in Al-Qastal. The loss of the charismatic Palestinian leader 'disrupted the Arab strategy and organisation in the area of Jerusalem.' His successor, Emil Ghuri, changed tactics: instead of provoking a series of ambushes throughout the route, he had a huge road block erected at Bab-el-Oued, and Jerusalem was once again isolated as a consequence.
Between the beginning of December 1947 and the end of May 1948, when the Israeli army was created, 574 deaths are listed. Five hundred and twenty-four were killed in action or in battle; seventy-seven while on convoy duty or securing roads; fifty-nine during Operation Yevusi, including thirty-four at Nabi Samuel; twenty during Operation Nachshon, all at al-Qastal; sixty-eight during Operation Yiftach; twelve at Mishmar HaEmek. By district one hundred and seventy-one members of the Palmach were killed in Jerusalem and the surrounding area, one hundred and four in and around Gush Etzion, one hundred and three in the Galilee and eighty-one in the Negev.