Synonyms for amafinius or Related words with amafinius

giunio              lacydes              moderatus              matidius              leontium              incolis              illustrius              frisiorum              timycha              paraenesis              colluthus              isaurus              visellius              judicia              scripturam              sisenna              helpidius              hierocaesarea              quintius              flaccinator              eryxias              ludicrus              calpurnianus              foslius              triumphi              tuticanus              franciscani              kallimachos              musurus              ferrandus              carterius              firmanus              aconius              cleitophon              brutum              venales              laonicus              catullinus              drepanius              paconius              columbani              diphilus              pedianus              fabianus              epigrammatist              calvini              heywat              ashem              andrecopoulos              anaxarchus             



Examples of "amafinius"
Roman "epicureanism" was the philosophy of: Amafinius · Rabirius · Titus Albucius · Phaedrus · Philodemus · Lucretius · Patro · Catius ·Siro · Diogenes of Oenoanda
Rabirius was a 1st-century BC Epicurean associated with Amafinius and Catius as one of the early popularizers of the philosophy in Italy. Their works on Epicureanism were the earliest philosophical treatises written in Latin. Other than Lucretius, Amafinius and Rabirius are the only Roman Epicurean writers named by Cicero.
Catius ("fl." 50s–40s BC?) was an Epicurean philosopher, identified ethnically as an Insubrian Celt from Gallia Transpadana. Epicurean works by Amafinius, Rabirius, and Catius were the earliest philosophical treatises written in Latin. Catius composed a treatise in four books on the physical world and on the highest good ("De rerum natura et de summo bono"). Cicero credits him, along with the lesser prose stylist Amafinius, with writing accessible texts that popularized Epicurean philosophy among the "plebs", or common people.
The "Tusculan Disputations" is the "locus classicus" of the legend of the Sword of Damocles, as well as of the sole mention of "cultura animi" as an agricultural metaphor for human culture. Cicero also mentions disapprovingly Amafinius, one of the first Latin writers on philosophy in Rome.
The gens Amafinia or Amafania was a Roman family during the late Republic. The best-known member of the gens was Gaius Amafinius, one of the earliest Roman writers in favor of the Epicurean philosophy. Cicero considered his works deficient in arrangement and style.
In his "Academica", Cicero criticizes Amafinius, and his fellow Epicurean Rabirius for their unsophisticated prose style, and says that in their efforts to introduce philosophy to common people they end up saying nothing. He concludes indignantly: "they think there is no art of speechmaking or composition."
In his "Academica", Cicero criticizes Amafinius and Rabirius from an elitist perspective for their unsophisticated prose style, and says that in their efforts to introduce philosophy to common people they end up saying nothing. He concludes indignantly: "they think there is no art of speechmaking or composition." Although Cicero in his writings is mostly hostile toward Epicureanism, his dear friend Atticus was an Epicurean, and this remark, occurring within a dialogue, is attributed to the interlocutor Varro, not framed as Cicero's own view.
Gaius Amafinius (or Amafanius) was one of the earliest Roman writers in favour of the Epicurean philosophy. He probably lived in the late 2nd and early 1st century BC. He wrote several works, which are censured by Cicero as deficient in arrangement and style. He is mentioned by no other ancient writer but Cicero. In the "Academica", Cicero reveals that Amafanius translated the Greek concept of atoms as "corpuscles" ("corpusculi") in Latin.
One of the earliest Roman writers espousing Epicureanism was Amafinius. Other adherents to the teachings of Epicurus included the poet Horace, whose famous statement "Carpe Diem" ("Seize the Day") illustrates the philosophy, as well as Lucretius, as he showed in his "De Rerum Natura". The poet Virgil was another prominent Epicurean (see Lucretius for further details). The Epicurean philosopher Philodemus of Gadara, until the 18th century only known as a poet of minor importance, rose to prominence as most of his work along with other Epicurean material was discovered in the Villa of the Papyri.