Synonyms for amanvillers or Related words with amanvillers

dieuze              drusenheim              obergailbach              nousseviller              filain              sarrebourg              schweighouse              oberhoffen              weyersheim              faulquemont              mouterhouse              mittersheim              merlebach              hargicourt              herrlisheim              soufflenheim              pargny              altkirch              bitche              reclinghem              ohlungen              sarralbe              kilstett              ormersviller              aulnoye              gambsheim              thumesnil              hangenbieten              nilvange              reunis              sarraltroff              meymac              inzinzac              montbronn              tronville              grisolles              rambervillers              maisnil              argentat              noyal              puttelange              freyming              algrange              offendorf              stenay              croisilles              oisemont              gruchet              beaurains              holtzheim             



Examples of "amanvillers"
Amanvillers is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in northeastern France.
On September 13, 1944, the US military is redeploying its troops on the front line, to concentrate its attack on the fortifications. But fatigue and stress disorient the men of the "2nd Infantry regiment, "which are ultimately relieved on September 14. The 1st Battalion "Task force", hard hit by the shelling of the and specific small arms fire, had to withdraw with difficulty behind a screen of smoke rockets, more than five hundred meters from Amanvillers. Around 14:00, an air strike on Amanvillers does not allow the infantry to advance, the village being too close to the fortifications of the sector to be taken in full.
The battlefield extends from the woods which border, the Moselle above Metz to Roncourt, near the river Orne. Other villages which played an important part in the battle of Gravelotte were Saint-Privat, Amanvillers and Sainte-Marie-aux-Chênes, all lying to the north of Gravelotte.
The September 13, 1944, US Staff redeploy its troops on the front line to focus its attack on the fortifications. But fatigue and stress now disorient the men of "2nd Infantry regiment "and they are finally relieved of such a "Hell hole", September 14, 1944. The 1 Battalion "Task force", hard hit by the shelling of and specific small arms fire, had to withdraw with difficulty behind a screen of smoke rockets, more than five hundred meters from Amanvillers. Around 14:00, an air strike on Amanvillers does not allow the infantry to advance, the village being too close to the fortifications of the sector to be taken in full. Two regiments, reinforced by the engineering companies "90th Infantry Division," take over in the area: the "357 Infantry Regiment" of Colonel Barth takes position along the woods of Jaumont", East of Saint-Privat, while "359 Infantry Regiment of "Colonel Bacon takes a position east of Gravelotte."
In early September 1944, the beginning of the Battle of Metz happens. The German command integrates the defensive system set up around Metz. On September 2, 1944, Metz was declared, in effect by the Reich, fortress Hitler. The fortress must be defended to the last by German troops, whose leaders were all sworn to the Führer. The next day, September 3, 1944, General Krause, then commander of the fortress of Metz, established his "High Command, "the main command post in the barracks fort Alvensleben. The same day, the troops of General Krause took position on a line from Pagny-sur-Moselle to Mondelange, passing to the west of Metz by Chambley, Mars-la-Tour, Jarny and Briey. After an initial withdrawal, made on September 6, 1944, on Saint-privat and Amanvillers, the German lines are now based firmly on the forts of the sector, particularly in the Group Fortification Lorraine, or "Feste Lorraine, a"nd the fortified positions on the sides of Amanvillers: "Steinbruch-Stellung, "Kellermann, and "Wolfsberg-Stellung", Richepance and "Batterie Vemont" and Canrobert, and "Horimont-Steelung". The area of Amanvillers - Saint-Privat is bound to the north by "1010th Sicherungs-Regiment of the" Colonel Richter of the and to the south by the "Fahnenjunker" of the "Fahnenjunkerschule VI des Heeres, "Metz" "under the command of Wehrmacht Colonel Siegroth. The sector fortifications line from Gravelotte to Semécourt, which consist of a discontinuous concrete wall, three meters high and 10   meters wide, reinforced by four forts, covered on the west by a line of outposts, trenches, barbed wire and machine gun positions, looks stunning.
The battlefield extended from the woods that border the Moselle above Metz to Roncourt, near the river Orne. Other villages which played an important part in the battle of Gravelotte were Saint Privat, Amanweiler or Amanvillers and Sainte-Marie-aux-Chênes, all lying to the north of Gravelotte. The combined German forces, under Field Marshal von Moltke, were the Prussian First and Second Armies of the North German Confederation. The French Army of the Rhine, commanded by Marshal Bazaine, dug in along high ground with their southern left flank at the town of Rozerieulles, and their northern right flank at St. Privat.
In 1863 he was made commander of the 2nd division of the French Imperial Guard, in 1865 he was appointed deputy governor of French Algeria and the named Senator in 1866. After a period as commander of the military camp at Châlons, he assumed command of II Corps at Lille in 1867. During the Franco-Prussian War he was placed in command of the IV Corps of the "Army of the Rhine", taking part in the battles of Mars-la-Tour and Saint-Privat; during the latter he repulsed the German attack at Amanvillers. After the capitulation of the Bazaine's army however, he became a Prussian prisoner of war.
Group Fortification Lorraine was built on the heights of Saulny. It was to strengthen the northwest edge of the first fortified belt. It controlled the railway axis Metz-Verdun, through Amanvillers and the highway Metz-Briey. Covering an area of 385 ha, the "Feste Lorraine" was built from 1899 to 1903. It consists of a main fortification and two support points north and west. It has 6 howitzers 150mm wide and six long guns 100mm wide. It has 14 observation domes and 24 lookout posts. It has two concrete barracks, one for 1,000 men, the other for 400 men. It was indeed designed to accommodate four infantry companies, in addition to the gunners. The "Feste" had a phone line and a power plant with 4 diesel engines of 35 hp. and 600m of underground tunnels connecting the different positions.
On September 10, 1944, three squadrons of fighter-bombers dump their bombs on the eastern sector of Amanvillers where the fortifications are grouped. The P-47s reach their targets, but the 500-pound bombs have little effect on the reinforced concrete fortifications. The infantry attack was launched at 18:00, meeting fierce resistance. Despite the support of tanks, it stops three hours later, out of breath. Towards Gravelotte, in the "Woods Génivaux "American troops also destroy the Officer Cadets of wehrmacht Colonel Siegroth that dominate the field. On September 10, 1944, the commander of the 7th Armored Division agrees to take a position near Roncourt to support a new attack of the "2nd Infantry regiment".
After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, with the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the defensive system set up around Metz. On September 2, 1944, Metz declared fortress Reich by Hitler. The "place forte" must be defended to the last by German troops, whose leaders were all sworn to the Führer. The defense is organized around the . From September 6, 1944, the Group Fortification Francis de Guise serves as a forward base on the front line for German units of the . At that time, German troops are based firmly at the strengths of the sector, especially in the Group Fortification Francois de Guise, ideally located between the Group Fortification Lorraine, or "Festivals Lorraine", and the Fort Jeanne d'Arc, or "Fixed Empress". In the area of Amanvillers - Saint-Privat is held further north by the "1010th Backup Regiment of" Colonel Richter of the and further south by the "Cadets" of the "Fahnenjunkerschule VI des Heeres, "Metz" "under the command of Wehrmacht (army)Colonel Joachim von Siegroth.
On 18 August, the battle began when at 08:00 Moltke ordered the First and Second Armies to advance against the French positions. By 12:00, General Manstein opened up the battle before the village of Amanvillers with artillery from the Hessian 25th Infantry Division. But the French had spent the night and early morning digging trenches and rifle pits while placing their artillery and their mitrailleuses in concealed positions. Finally aware of the Prussian advance, the French opened up a massive return fire against the mass of advancing Germans. The battle at first appeared to favor the French with their superior Chassepot rifle. However, the Prussian artillery was superior with the all-steel Krupp breech-loading gun. By 14:30, General Steinmetz, the commander of the First Army, unilaterally launched his VIII Corps across the Mance Ravine in which the Prussian infantry were soon pinned down by murderous rifle and mitrailleuse fire from the French positions. At 15:00, the massed guns of the VII and VIII Corps opened fire to support the attack. But by 16:00, with the attack in danger of stalling, Steinmetz ordered the VII Corps forward, followed by the 1st Cavalry Division.
The Colonel of the Roffe "2nd Infantry regiment, "whose losses already amounted to 14 officers and 332 men on the morning of September 9, requires the air support of General Silvester. The September 10, 1944, three squadrons of fighter-bombers dump their bombs on the eastern sector of Amanvillers where the fortifications are grouped. The P-47s reach their targets, but the 500-pound bombs have little effect on the reinforced concrete fortifications. The infantry attack at 18:00 meets fierce resistance. Despite the support of tanks, it stops breathless three hours later. Towards Gravelotte, in the "Woods Génivaux "American troops destroy the Fahnenjunker of Wehrmacht (army) Colonel Siegroth that dominate the field. On the September 10, 1944, the commander of the 7 Armored Division agrees to take position near Roncourt to support a new attack from "2 Infantry regiment". The September 11, 1944, at 6:30 am, the tanks are headed for Pierrevillers, wiping the passage with sporadic gunfire. They finally come across a antitank roadblock, under fire from anti-tank guns camouflaged and difficult to locate. The infantry, however, manages to take a position on the wooded slopes, northwest of the village of Bronvaux, too far, however, to support the "2 Infantry regiment". Despite several counter attacks by the , American troops arrive to take over the land in the late afternoon, after a rolling artillery barrage targeting fortifications in the sector, and using smoke shells for cover.
On 18 August, the battle began when at 08:00 Moltke ordered the First and Second Armies to advance against the French positions. By 12:00, General Manstein opened up the battle before the village of Amanvillers with artillery from the 25th Infantry Division. But the French had spent the night and early morning digging trenches and rifle pits while placing their artillery and their mitrailleuses in concealed positions. Finally aware of the Prussian advance, the French opened up a massive return fire against the mass of advancing Germans. The battle at first appeared to favour the French with their superior Chassepot rifle. However, the Prussian artillery was superior with the all-steel Krupp breech-loading gun. By 14:30, General Steinmetz, the commander of the First Army, unilaterally launched his VIII Corps across the Mance Ravine in which the Prussian infantry were soon pinned down by murderous rifle and mitrailleuse fire from the French positions. At 15:00, the massed guns of the VII and VIII Corps opened fire to support the attack. But by 16:00, with the attack in danger of stalling, Steinmetz ordered the VII Corps forward, followed by the 1st Cavalry Division.