Synonyms for angusticollis or Related words with angusticollis

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Examples of "angusticollis"
Nebria angusticollis angusticollis is a subspecies of ground beetle in the Nebriinae subfamily that can be found in the Alps of France, Italy, and Switzerland.
Danuria angusticollis is a species of praying mantis in the genus "Danuria".
Ernobius angusticollis is a species of beetle in the family Anobiidae.
Dyschirius angusticollis is a species of ground beetle in the subfamily Scaritinae. It was described by Putzeys in 1866.
Beraba angusticollis is a species of beetle in the family Cerambycidae. It was described by Zajciw in 1961.
Mecyclothorax angusticollis is a species of ground beetle in the subfamily Psydrinae. It was described by Blackburn in 1878.
Trechus angusticollis is a species of ground beetle in the subfamily Trechinae. It was described by Kiesenwetter in 1850.
Ectenessa angusticollis is a species of beetle in the family Cerambycidae. It was described by Buquet in 1860.
Megacephala angusticollis is a species of ground beetle in the subfamily of Carabinae. It was described by W. Horn in 1896.
The short-winged blister beetle, or oil beetle ("Meloe angusticollis") is a species of blister beetle, native to North America. They average in length.
Elaphrus angusticollis is a species of ground beetle in the subfamily Elaphrinae. It was described by R. F. Sahlberg in 1844.
Sophronica angusticollis is a species of beetle in the family Cerambycidae. It was described by Aurivillius in 1928. It is known from Somalia, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Kenya.
The genus has three species; "Zootermopsis angusticollis", "Zootermopsis laticeps", and "Zootermopsis nevadensis". "Z. nevadensis" is subdivided into two subspecies, "Z. n. nevadensis" and "Z. n. nuttingi".
Nebria angusticollis is a species of ground beetle in Nebriinae subfamily that can be found in the Alps of France, Italy, and Switzerland.
Nebria angusticollis microcephala is a subspecies of ground beetle in the Nebriinae subfamily that can be found in the Alps of France, Italy, and Switzerland.
Ropica angusticollis is a species of beetle in the family Cerambycidae. It was described by Pascoe in 1865. It is known from Borneo.
As reported in 2014, experiments with the fly "Telostylinus angusticollis" showed that "it is possible for a male to transmit features of his phenotype via non-genetic semen-borne factors to his mate's subsequent offspring sired by another male."
Research on the Australian neriid "Telostylinus angusticollis" has shown that adult body size and shape are extremely sensitive to larval diet: larvae reared in nutrient-rich substrates exhibit greater body size as adults, and males have more elongated bodies, compared to flies reared in nutrient-poor substrates. The expression of male secondary sexual traits is particularly sensitive to the protein content of the larval diet. Developmental plasticity in response to variation in larval diet quality has diversified among populations of "Telostylinus angusticollis" along the east coast of Australia.
Dmytro Zajciw was a Brazilian entomologist, notable for his collection and for his many beetle discoveries. He was the author of "Two new genera and species of neotropical Longhorn beetles (Coleoptera Cerambycidae)", 1957, "Contribution to the study of Longhorn beetles of Rio de Janeiro (Coleoptera Cerambycidae)", 1958, and was the first to describe the genera "Adesmoides" and "Pseudogrammopsis", as well as the species "Beraba angusticollis" and "Mionochroma subaurosum", among many others.
The lack of collective defences in some eusocial taxa also shows that social immunity may also not always be adaptive (due to life history costs or ineffectiveness against a particular parasite's infective strategy), and that living in a group does not necessitate the expression of any particular suite of social immunity mechanisms. For example, worker termites ("Zootermopsiss angusticollis") do not discriminate between infected and uninfected conspecifics, pharaoh ant colonies ("Monomorium pharaonis") choose to move into infected nests over uninfected ones and queen wood ants ("Formica paralugubris") are not repelled but actually attracted to habitats contaminated with entamopathogenic fungi.