Synonyms for anorgasmia or Related words with anorgasmia

hsdd              fsad              dyspareunia              orgasmic              vaginismus              impotence              impotency              frigidity              oligospermia              pmdd              hypoestrogenism              asthenospermia              subfertility              oligomenorrhea              dysphoria              climacteric              anosmia              oligoovulation              dyssynergia              hypogonadism              ejaculation              vestibulodynia              menopausal              asthenozoospermia              adenomyosis              perimenopause              pollakiuria              hyposexuality              hypoactive              andropause              hyposalivation              hypogeusia              hypersexuality              hypermenorrhea              orgasm              mastodynia              noncoital              polymenorrhea              metrorrhagia              sialorrhea              anorgasmy              symptomatologies              neurasthenia              gynecomastia              otalgia              orgasms              anejaculation              anorgasmic              prostatism              hypogonadotrophic             



Examples of "anorgasmia"
Another cause of anorgasmia is opiate addiction, particularly to heroin.
Anorgasmia is a type of sexual dysfunction in which a person cannot achieve orgasm despite adequate stimulation. In males, it is most closely associated with delayed ejaculation. Anorgasmia can often cause sexual frustration. Anorgasmia is far more common in females (4.7 percent) than in males and is especially rare in younger men. The problem is greater in women who are post-menopause.
Secondary anorgasmia is the loss of the ability to have orgasms (as opposed to primary anorgasmia which indicates a person who has never had an orgasm). Or loss of the ability to reach orgasm of past intensity. The cause may be alcoholism, depression, grief, pelvic surgery (such as total hysterectomy) or injuries, certain medications, illness, estrogen deprivation associated with menopause, or rape.
A common cause of situational anorgasmia, in both men and women, is the use of anti-depressants, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Though reporting of anorgasmia as a side effect of SSRIs is not precise, studies have found that 17–41% of users of such medications are affected by some form of sexual dysfunction.
Escitalopram, like other SSRIs, has been shown to affect sexual functions causing side effects such as decreased libido, delayed ejaculation, genital anesthesia, and anorgasmia.
Cabergoline, an agonist of dopamine D₂ receptors which inhibits prolactin production, was found in a small study to fully restore orgasm in one third of anorgasmic subjects, and partially restore orgasm in another third. Limited data has shown that the drug amantadine may help to relieve SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. Cyproheptadine, buspirone, stimulants such as amphetamines (including the antidepressant bupropion), nefazodone and yohimbine have been used to treat SSRI-induced anorgasmia. Reducing the SSRI dosage may also resolve anorgasmia problems.
Effective treatment for anorgasmia depends on the cause. In the case of women suffering from psychological sexual trauma or inhibition, psychosexual counselling might be advisable and could be obtained through general practitioner (GP) referral.
The inability to have orgasm, or regular difficulty reaching orgasm after ample sexual stimulation, is called anorgasmia or inorgasmia. If a male experiences erection and ejaculation but no orgasm, he is said to have sexual anhedonia (a condition in which an individual cannot feel pleasure from an orgasm) or ejaculatory anhedonia. Anorgasmia is significantly more common in women than in men, which has been attributed to the lack of sex education with regard to women's bodies, especially in sex-negative cultures, such as clitoral stimulation usually being key for women to orgasm.
Premature ejaculation is when ejaculation occurs before the desired time. If a man is unable to ejaculate in a timely manner after prolonged sexual stimulation, in spite of his desire to do so, it is called delayed ejaculation or anorgasmia. An orgasm that is not accompanied by ejaculation is known as a dry orgasm.
For Reich, "orgastic impotence," or failure to attain orgastic potency (not to be confused with anorgasmia, the inability to reach orgasm) always resulted in neurosis, because during orgasm that person could not discharge all libido (which Reich regarded as a biological energy). According to Reich, "not a single neurotic individual possesses orgastic potency."
The NIH states that yohimbine hydrochloride has been shown in human studies to be possibly effective in the treatment of male impotence resulting from erectile dysfunction or SSRI usage (e.g., anorgasmia). Published reports have shown it to be effective in the treatment of orgasmic dysfunction in men.
Unlike most serotonin reuptake inhibitors, nefazodone has a low incidence of negative effects on libido or sexual function, and is occasionally used as treatment for SSRI or SNRI-induced impotence and anorgasmia in men. Additionally, unlike mirtazapine, nefazodone is not especially associated with increased appetite and weight gain either.
SSRIs can cause various types of sexual dysfunction such as anorgasmia, erectile dysfunction, diminished libido, genital numbness, and sexual anhedonia (pleasureless orgasm). Sexual problems are common with SSRIs. Poor sexual function is also one of the most common reasons people stop the medication.
The use of a clitoral pump is not only restricted to sexual pleasure purposes. Their use is often recommended by physicians for treating female sexual problems connected with anorgasmia. Improved blood flow to the genitals may be achieved through regular use of the device.
Sexual dysfunction is often a side effect with SSRIs. Specifically, common side effects include difficulty becoming aroused, lack of interest in sex, and anorgasmia (trouble achieving orgasm). One study showed, however, when remission of major depressive disorder is achieved, quality of life and sexual satisfaction is reported to be higher in spite of sexual side effects.
Sexual frustration or sexual starvation in humans is frustration caused by a discrepancy between a person's desired and achieved sexual activity. It can be a result of obtaining less sex than desired, or of not being satisfied during sex (which may be due to issues such as anorgasmia, premature ejaculation, or erectile dysfunction).
It consists of two questionnaires (i.e. a male and a female questionnaire) with 28 items each. It studies sexual dysfunctions in heterosexual subjects. It provides a total score and subscales scores: intercourse frequency, incommunicability, dissatisfaction, avoiding sexual intercourse, absence of sexuality, anorgasmia and vaginismus (only in the female version), impotence and premature ejaculation (only in the male version).
A person who is troubled by experiencing situational anorgasmia should be encouraged to explore alone and with his or her partner those factors that may affect whether or not he or she is orgasmic, such as fatigue, emotional concerns, feeling pressured to have sex when he or she is not interested, or a partner's sexual dysfunction. In the relatively common case of female situational anorgasmia during penile-vaginal intercourse, some sex therapists recommend that couples incorporate manual or vibrator stimulation during intercourse, or using the female-above position as it may allow for greater stimulation of the clitoris by the penis or pubic symphysis or both, and it allows the woman better control of movement.
Sexual dysfunction, including loss of libido, anorgasmia, lack of vaginal lubrication, and erectile dysfunction, is one of the most commonly encountered adverse effects of treatment with paroxetine and other SSRIs. While early clinical trials suggested a relatively low rate of sexual dysfunction, more recent studies in which the investigator actively inquires about sexual problems suggest that the incidence is >70%. Symptoms of sexual dysfunction have been reported to persist after discontinuing SSRIs, although this is thought to be occasional.
Sexual dysfunction, including loss of libido, anorgasmia, lack of vaginal lubrication, and erectile dysfunction, is one of the most commonly encountered adverse effects of treatment with fluoxetine and other SSRIs. While early clinical trials suggested a relatively low rate of sexual dysfunction, more recent studies in which the investigator actively inquires about sexual problems suggest that the incidence is >70%. Symptoms of sexual dysfunction have been reported to persist after discontinuing SSRIs, although this is thought to be occasional.