Synonyms for anovulatory or Related words with anovulatory

ovulatory              oligomenorrhea              anovulation              polymenorrhea              subfertility              perimenopause              perimenopausal              metrorrhagia              ovulating              postmenopause              hyperandrogenemia              andropause              hypomenorrhea              oligospermia              premenopausal              menstruating              hypermenorrhea              oligomenorrhoea              hypoestrogenism              climacteric              menorrhagia              oligoovulation              orgasmic              anestrus              estrous              azoospermic              hyperandrogenism              menstruate              unifolliculogenesis              gynecomastia              prepubertal              unovulation              asthenozoospermia              azoospermia              luteinization              ohss              proestrus              menopausal              infertile              anorgasmic              menarche              ovulations              amenorrheic              galactorrhoea              amenorrhea              luteal              adenomyosis              menstruation              metestrus              diestrus             



Examples of "anovulatory"
Infrequent or irregular ovulation is called "oligoovulation". The absence of ovulation is called "anovulation". Normal menstrual flow can occur without ovulation preceding it: an anovulatory cycle. In some cycles, follicular development may start but not be completed; nevertheless, estrogens will be formed and stimulate the uterine lining. Anovulatory flow resulting from a very thick endometrium caused by prolonged, continued high estrogen levels is called "estrogen breakthrough bleeding". Anovulatory bleeding triggered by a sudden drop in estrogen levels is called withdrawal bleeding. Anovulatory cycles commonly occur before menopause (perimenopause) and in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
For those who after weightloss still are anovulatory or for anovulatory lean women, ovulation induction to reverse the anovulation is the principal treatment used to help infertility in PCOS. Clomiphene citrate is the main medication used for this purpose, and is the first-line treatment in subfertile anovulatory patients with PCOS. Gonadotrophins such as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) are, in addition to surgery, second-line treatments.
Assessment of anovulatory DUB should always start with a good medical history and physical examination.
For those women that after weight loss still are anovulatory or for anovulatory lean women, then the ovulation-inducing medications clomiphene citrate and FSH are the principal treatments used to promote ovulation. Previously, the anti-diabetes medication metformin was recommended treatment for anovulation, but it appears less effective than clomiphene.
For overweight women with PCOS who are anovulatory, diet adjustments and weight loss are associated with resumption of spontaneous ovulation.
For overweight, anovulatory women with PCOS, weight loss and diet adjustments, especially to reduce the intake of simple carbohydrates, are associated with resumption of natural ovulation.
Tamoxifen is used to treat infertility in women with anovulatory disorders. It is given at days 3–7 of a woman's cycle.
Normal menstrual bleeding in the ovulatory cycle is a result of a decline in progesterone due to the demise of the corpus luteum. It is thus a progesterone withdrawal bleeding. As there is no progesterone in the anovulatory cycle, bleeding is caused by the inability of estrogen — that needs to be present to stimulate the endometrium in the first place — to support a growing endometrium. Anovulatory bleeding is hence termed estrogen breakthrough bleeding.
In anovulatory cycles using progestogen-only contraceptives, the endometrium is thin and atrophic. If the endometrium were also thin and atrophic during an ovulatory cycle, this could, in theory, interfere with implantation of a blastocyst (embryo).
While the normal menstrual cycle in the human typically lasts 4 weeks (28 days, range 21–35 days) and consists of a follicular phase, ovulation, and a luteal phase, followed by either menstruation or pregnancy, the anovulatory cycle has cycle
Polycystic ovary disease (PCOS) is a hormonal imbalance in women that is thought to be one of the leading causes of female infertility. Polycystic ovary syndrome causes more than 75% of cases of anovulatory infertility.
The anovulatory cycle is a menstrual cycle characterized by varying degrees of menstrual intervals and the absence of ovulation and a luteal phase. In the absence of ovulation, there will be infertility.
In anovulatory cycles using progestogen-only contraceptives, the endometrium is thin and atrophic. If the endometrium was also thin and atrophic during an ovulatory cycle, this could theoretically interfere with implantation of a blastocyst (embryo).
Finally, calendar-based methods assume that all bleeding is true menstruation. However, mid-cycle or anovulatory bleeding can be caused by a number of factors. Incorrectly identifying bleeding as menstruation will cause the method's calculations to be incorrect.
The average age of menarche in the United States is about 12.5 years. In postmenarchal girls, about 80% of the cycles are anovulatory in the first year after menarche, 50% in the third and 10% in the sixth year.
About 90% of DUB events occur when ovulation is not occurring (Anovulatory DUB). Anovulatory menstrual cycles are common at the extremes of reproductive age, such as early puberty and perimenopause (period around menopause). In such cases, women do not properly develop and release a mature egg. When this happens, the corpus luteum, which is a mound of tissue that produces progesterone, does not form. As a result, estrogen is produced continuously, causing an overgrowth of the uterus lining. The period is delayed in such cases, and when it occurs menstruation can be very heavy and prolonged. Sometimes anovulatory DUB is due to a delay in the full maturation of the reproductive system in teenagers. Usually, however, the mechanisms are unknown.
Hyperprolactinaemia, or excess serum prolactin, is associated with hypoestrogenism, anovulatory infertility, oligomenorrhoea, amenorrhoea, unexpected lactation and loss of libido in women and erectile dysfunction and loss of libido in men.
AUB can be classified as "ovulatory" or "anovulatory", depending on whether ovulation is occurring or not. It is usually a menstrual disorder, although abnormal bleeding from the uterus is possible outside of menstruation.
Oral treatment of dienogest 2 mg/day in cyclical women reduced serum progesterone levels to anovulatory levels, however serum levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone are not significantly altered.
Although the first post-partum cycle is sometimes anovulatory (reducing the likelihood of becoming pregnant again before having a post-partum period), subsequent cycles are almost always ovulatory and therefore must be considered fertile. However, some women find that breastfeeding interferes with fertility even after ovulation has resumed. Luteal phases being too short to sustain pregnancy is a common example.