Synonyms for antichrists or Related words with antichrists

valentinians              marcion              sethians              docetism              blasphemers              apocatastasis              eutyches              ebionites              priscillianism              priscillian              neferti              sabellianism              prophesies              antichrist              pelagians              novatian              philosophumena              romish              gnostic              nazarenes              montanism              tritheism              tertullian              pelagian              cerinthus              heresies              pelagianism              christological              gnostics              annihilationism              adoptionist              encratites              marcionism              apologeticus              flavianum              prophesying              heresiarch              marcionites              blasphemies              modalism              adoptionism              antinomianism              antinomians              eschatological              sadducees              exegetes              manichaeans              parousia              monophysitism              donatism             



Examples of "antichrists"
The words "antichrist" and "antichrists" appear four times in the First and Second Epistle of John. 1 John chapter 2 refers to many antichrists present at the time while warning of one Antichrist that is coming. The "many antichrists" belong to the same spirit as that of the one Antichrist. John wrote that such antichrists deny "that Jesus is the Christ", "the Father and the Son", and would "not confess Jesus came in the flesh.": a probable reference to the Gnostic claim that Jesus was not human, but only a spirit.
The Antichrist is a Christian concept based on the exegesis of Second Temple (500 BC–50 AD) Jewish texts that refer to anti-messiahs (see List of fictional Antichrists).
The five uses of the term "antichrist" or "antichrists" in the Epistles of John do not clearly present a single latter-day individual Antichrist. The articles "the deceiver" or "the antichrist" are usually seen as marking out a certain category of persons, rather than an individual.
His writings include: "A dissertation of the Fable of Papal Antichrists" (London, 1816); "A Winter Evening Dialogue ... or, Thoughts on the Rule of Faith" (London, 1816); and various journals, letters, and MSS. in connexion with his residence in Rome; his notes on the old archives of the English College there are of historical interest; all are in the Westminster archdiocesan archives.
Optatus claims that a dispute broke out between Lucilla a woman of high rank and the deacon Caecilian, who had reprimanded her for touching a relique of a saint. The offence, he claimed had festered and at the accession to the bishopric of Caecilian, Lucilla joined with the Council of Bishops who Optatus called Antichrists and betrayers. he concluded "...the Schism was brought to birth by the anger of a disgraced woman, was fed by ambition, and received its strength from avarice"
As word of Wheelwright's sermon circulated, however, Winthrop was made much more aware of its incendiary character, and he then wrote that Wheelwright "inveighed against all that walked in a covenant of works," and concerning those who preached works, he "called them antichrists, and stirred up the people against them with much bitterness and vehemency". The free grace advocates, on the other hand, were encouraged by the sermon, and intensified their crusade against the "legalists" among the clergy. During church services and lectures they publicly asked the ministers about their doctrines which disagreed with their own beliefs, and Henry Vane in particular became active in challenging the doctrines of the colony's divines.
In hopes of bringing the mounting crisis under control, the General Court called for a day of fasting and repentance to be held on Thursday, 19 January 1637. During the Boston church service held that day, Cotton invited Wheelwright to come forward and deliver a sermon. Instead of the hoped-for peace, the opposite transpired. In the sermon Wheelwright stated that those who taught a covenant of works were Antichrists, and all the ministers besides Cotton saw this as being directed at them, though Wheelwright later denied this. During a meeting of the General Court in March Wheelwright was questioned at length, and ultimately charged with sedition, though not sentenced.
In Platonic philosophy and other Greek philosophical thought, at death the soul was said to leave the inferior body behind. The idea that Jesus was resurrected spiritually rather than physically even gained popularity among some Christian teachers, whom the author of 1 John declared to be antichrists. Similar beliefs appeared in the early church as Gnosticism. However, in Luke 24:39, the resurrected Jesus expressly states "behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Handle me and see, for a spirit does not have flesh and bones as you see I have."
Some have interpreted the writings as predicting a series of three antichrists. However, the name "Mabus" as a synonym for or embodiment of the third antichrist is not suggested by any of the "Prophecies". In fact the verse in question (II.62) merely states that a character of a similar-sounding name (according to Lemesurier ["op. cit."], a reference to the Flemish painter Jan Mabuse, contemporary with Nostradamus) "will die". Otherwise, the reference says nothing about what "Mabus" will do or what he will be like.
Despite his own Jewish ancestry, David Berg was outspokenly anti-Semitic, believing that the Jews were responsible for the death of Jesus, as well as all persecution of Christians in the world. In support of his views of an international Jewish conspiracy, he cited the forged "Protocols of the Elders of Zion", but disclaimed the label "anti-Semitic". Berg was also known to attack black people in his letters, as he believed the Curse of Ham applied to them. He also claimed that black people were being used by a group referred to by him as the AC's (antichrists) in order to bring about the new world order.
The sect believes that Russian Prime Minister and now Russian President Vladimir Putin is the reincarnation of Paul the Apostle, sent to Russia to prepare its people for the Second Coming of Christ; Putin is also thought to have joined with seven other reborn apostles to fight the antichrists. Mother Fotina notes the similarities between Paul and Putin's careers, including being an early "persecutor of Christians" before becoming imbued with the Holy Spirit; the group believes that Putin received the Holy Spirit after becoming president. Putin is also said to be a reincarnation of Vladimir the Great.
Rivera claimed that the Jesuit order was responsible for the creation of communism, Islam, and Nazism, and causing the World Wars, recession, the Jonestown Massacre, and the assassinations of Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy (a Catholic). Rivera further claims that the Catholic Church wants to spread homosexuality and abortion notwithstanding the church's stated opposition to gays and to abortions, that the Charismatic Movement which is a non Catholic christian movement is somehow a "front" for the Catholic Church. He further claimed that the Popes are antichrists, and that the Catholic Church is the Whore of Babylon. He has also claimed that the Jesuits were the masterminds behind the Medieval Inquisition in the 13th century. The Jesuits were in fact founded in 1534.
By late 1636, the theological schism had become great enough that the General Court called for a day of fasting to help ease the colony's difficulties. The appointed fasting day, in January, included church services, and Cotton preached during the morning, but with Wilson away in England, John Wheelwright was invited to preach during the afternoon. Though his sermon may have seemed benign to the average listener in the congregation, most of the colony's ministers found Wheelwright's words to be objectionable. Instead of bringing peace, the sermon fanned the flames of controversy, and in Winthrop's words, Wheelwright "inveighed against all that walked in a covenant of works, ... and called them antichrists, and stirred up the people against them with much bitterness and vehemency." In contrast, the followers of Hutchinson were encouraged by the sermon, and intensified their crusade against the "legalists" among the clergy. During church services and lectures, they publicly questioned the ministers about their doctrines which disagreed with their own beliefs.
John Wheelwright was attending services at the Boston church during the appointed January day of fasting, and he was invited to preach during the afternoon. His sermon may have seemed benign to the average listener in the congregation, but most of the colony's ministers found it to be censurable. Instead of bringing peace, the sermon fanned the flames of controversy and, in Winthrop's words, Wheelwright "inveighed against all that walked in a covenant of works, as he described it to be, viz., such as maintain sanctification [i.e., holiness of behavior] as an evidence of justification etc. and called them antichrists, and stirred up the people against them with much bitterness and vehemency." The followers of Hutchinson were encouraged by the sermon and intensified their crusade against the "legalists" among the clergy. During church services and lectures, they publicly asked the ministers about their doctrines which disagreed with their own beliefs.
The next morning Wheelwright was given a private session with the court at which time he asked who his accusers were. The court's answer was that his sermon was the accuser. That afternoon, the court was opened to the general public, and the colony's ministers were also present. One of the lines of attack used against Wheelwright was identifying his doctrine, and that of Cotton, as being "False Doctrine" because of its difference from that of all of the other New England ministers. Cotton's angry response to this was, "Brother Wheelwright's Doctrine was according to God," letting the court know that by going after Wheelwright they were going after him as well, and this essentially ended that line of attack. After some additional ineffective prosecutorial attempts, the court hit on the idea of asking the colony's ministers if they felt they were attacked by Wheelwright's sermon. Following an evening to discuss this among themselves, the ministers returned to the court the next day. With Cotton dissenting, the other ministers said that they did "walk in" and teach what Wheelwright called a covenant of works, and therefore they were the Antichrists alluded to in the sermon.
Early Christian writers claimed that Muhammad was predicted in the Bible, as a forthcoming Antichrist, false prophet, or false Messiah. According to Albert Hourani, initial interactions between Christian and Muslim peoples were characterized by hostility on the part of the Europeans because they interpreted Muhammad in a Biblical context as being the Antichrist. The earliest known exponent of this view was John of Damascus in the 7th century. In c. 850 CE about 50 Christians were killed in Muslim-ruled Córdoba, Andalusia after a Christian priest named Perfectus said that Muhammad was one of the "false Christs" prophesied in Matthew 24:16.42. The monk Eulogius of Córdoba (c. 800-859 AD) justified the views of Perfectus and the other Martyrs of Córdoba, saying that they witnessed "against the angel of Satan and forerunner of Antichrist...Muhammed, the heresiarch." John Calvin argued that "The name Antichrist does not designate a single individual, but a single kingdom which extends throughout many generations", saying that both Muhammad and the Catholic popes were "antichrists".
The author wrote the epistle so that the joy of his audience would "be full" (1:4) and that they would "not practice sin" (2:1) and that "you who believe in the name of the Son of God... may know that you have eternal life" (5:13). We can therefore distinguish in the epistle both a general purpose (to increase mutual joy) and a specific purpose (to provide readers with tests by which they might assure themselves of their salvation). It appears as though the author was concerned about heretical teachers that had been influencing churches under his care. Such teachers were considered Antichrists (2:18–19) who had once been church leaders but whose teaching became heterodox. It appears that these teachers taught a form of docetism in which Jesus came to earth as a spirit without a real body of flesh (4:2) that his death on the cross was not as a true atonement for sins (1:7). It appears that John might have also been rebuking a proto-Gnostic named Cerinthus, who also denied the true humanity of Christ.