Synonyms for arigatō or Related words with arigatō

kimi_wo              anata_ni              owaranai              arigatou              anata_ga              aitai              ikenai              kimi_ni              arigato              omoi              yasashii              sayōnara              negai              watashi_wa              zutto              koi_wa              boku_wa              naritai              kimi_ga              watashi              kobukuro              itsuka              chiisana              wasurenai              kimi_wa              omoide              ga_ippai              ikimono_gakari              oshiete              haikei              soshite              yakusoku              yō_ni              boku_ni              rakuen              itsumo              anata_wo              hitori              tameni              kimochi              riyu              shiawase              kudasai              mou_ichido              watashi_ga              kanashii              namida              hoshii              hitotsu              hibi             



Examples of "arigatō"
It is often suggested that the Japanese word "arigatō" derives from the Portuguese "obrigado", both of which mean "Thank you", but evidence clearly indicates purely Japanese origin. The Japanese phrase "arigatō gozaimasu" is a polite form of "arigatō". This is a form of an adjective, "arigatai", for which written records exist dating back to the Man'yōshū, well before Japanese contact with Portugal.
Arigatō, arigatou or in popular culture arigato may refer to:
どうもありがとうミスターロボット ("dōmo arigatō misutā Robotto")
The song's chorus features the line, ""Dōmo arigatō", Mr. Roboto", which has become a catchphrase.
どうもありがとうミスターロボット ("dōmo arigatō misutā Robotto")
The word "arigatō" (Japanese for "thank you") sounds similar to the Portuguese word "obrigado", which has the same meaning. Given the number of borrowings from Portuguese, it may seem reasonable to suppose that the Japanese imported that word—which is the explanation accepted and indeed published by many. However, "arigatō" is not a "gairaigo"; rather, it is an abbreviation of "arigatō gozaimasu", which consists of an inflection of the native Japanese adjective "arigatai" () combined with the polite verb "gozaimasu". There is evidence, for example in the Man'yōshū, that the word "arigatai" was in use several centuries before contact with the Portuguese. This makes the two terms false cognates.
"Arigatō (Sekai no Doko ni Ite mo)" is a single by Hey! Say! JUMP. It was released on December 15, 2010.
"Song For You" was the other song previously released. It was included in Hitomi's single "Umarete Kurete Arigatō", which was her last single released under the Avex label. The last songs that Hitomi published under the Avex major label, "Umarete Kurete Arigatō" and "Smile World" -the two A-side songs of her last major single-, along with the thems songs of the NHK anime television series "Hanakappa", "Special" and "Guru Maze Yeah", were not included in the album.
"Umui Kaji" was released after two singles. "Sayōnara Arigatō (Ama no Kaze)/Mirai" in August 2006 was a re-arrangement of her song "Sayōnara Arigatō" (a single from "Ayakaji no Ne") by the song's writer, Kentarō Kobuchi of Kobukuro. The second A-side, "Mirai," did not feature on the album. "Furusato" was written by singer Noriyuki Makihara, and was used as the theme song for the drama Asakusa Fukumaru Ryokan.
"Umui Kaji" was released after two singles. "Sayōnara Arigatō (Ama no Kaze)/Mirai" in August 2006 was a re-arrangement of her song "Sayōnara Arigatō" (a single from "Ayakaji no Ne") by the song's writer, Kentarō Kobuchi of Kobukuro. The second A-side, "Mirai," did not feature on the album. "Furusato" was written by singer Noriyuki Makihara, and was used as the theme song for the drama Asakusa Fukumaru Ryokan.
The album was re-released in 2008, as Kokia Complete Collection 1998–1999, featuring the album as well bonus tracks from her Pony Canyon singles, "Aishiteiru Kara," "Tears in Love" and "Arigatō..."
The fleet was operated by JR Central on the Tokaido Shinkansen until the last units were withdrawn on 18 September 1999. In the last two months of service, they ran with "Arigatō 0 Series" stickers on the front ends.
The DVD that comes with the Limited "Miru" ("Watching") Edition contains a live recording of Team Syachihoko's concert titled "Tenchō Summit!!!: Arigatō o Tsutae Kirete Nakute" that was held on May 11, 2014 at Nakano Sun Plaza.
Featuring the A-side, "Minna Sora no Shita", the single includes the B-side "Arigatō" and a live version of "Koi Kogarete Mita Yume" that was recorded from her live performance on April 22 at Budokan.
The EP contains five previously released tracks in the aforementioned ninth single's A-side, plus four earlier single sides. Only one track, "Arigatō! Tomodachi", is exclusive to the EP.
Kokia released three singles before her album: , "Tears in Love" and "Arigatō...". "Ai no Field" was the anime Brain Powerd's ending theme song, and was produced by Yoko Kanno (however, it was released through Victor Entertainment and not Pony Canyon). "Tears in Love" was released in November. The B-side from this single, "Blue Night," was played as a theme song for a radio show Kokia had on FM Hokkaido, "Kokia Innocent Time". This is the first release Kokia worked on personally, as she wrote the lyrics on both tracks. Seven months later in June 1999, the final single, "Arigatō...," was released.
The song "Utau Hito" was later used as the ending theme song for the animated film in 2007. Director Akio Nishizawa felt the song was so fitting for his film, it was as if the song were commissioned specifically for it. The song featured on Kokia's first greatest hits album, "", as well as the B-side of her 2007 single "Arigatō... (The Pearl Edition)."
Kokia considers the lead single from the album, "Arigatō...," to be one of her favourite songs. She wrote the song in the mid 1990s, about the death of her family's pet dog. She has re-recorded it three times: on her 2006 greatest album, "", on the 2007 Japanese release of "" and on the limited edition of her 2009 second greatest hits album, "".
The full derivation is "arigatō", the “u” sound change of "arigataku" < "arigataku", the attributive form of arigatai, < "arigatai" < "arigatashi" < "ari" + "katashi". "Ari" is a verb meaning "to be" and "katashi" is an adjective meaning "difficult". The original meaning of "arigatashi" was "difficult to be", i.e. that the listener's generosity or behavior is "rare" and thus "special".
The eventual Japanese release, six months later, also featured bonus tracks: "Inochi no Hikari" and "Arigatō... (from Kokia 2007)." "Inochi no Hikari" was an original song Kokia has performed at concerts in 2006, while the other track is a re-recording of Kokia's Pony Canyon-era single.