Synonyms for atherfieldensis or Related words with atherfieldensis

mantellisaurus              hypsilophodon              valdosaurus              claosaurus              rhomaleosaurus              alectrosaurus              goniopholis              transsylvanicus              dryosaurus              thescelosaurus              grangeri              plesiosaurus              sanjuanensis              coronosaurus              angustidens              othnielia              pentaceratops              lambeosaurus              marshi              camptosaurus              gidleyi              hatcheri              pliosaurus              coloradisaurus              orodromeus              bucklandi              albertaceratops              ornithocheirus              sternbergii              amphicoelias              huenei              torvosaurus              hylaeosaurus              othnielosaurus              nothosaurus              dysalotosaurus              leedsi              paleorhinus              elmisaurus              polacanthus              osborni              struthiosaurus              stenopterygius              mongoliensis              tapejara              foxii              pattersoni              fittoni              alphadon              ornithopoda             



Examples of "atherfieldensis"
The type fossil was originally discovered by Reginald Walter Hooley in 1914 in the upper Vectis Formation of southern England and reported upon in 1917. He posthumously named it "Iguanodon atherfieldensis" in 1925. Atherfield is the name of a village on the southwest shore of the Isle of Wight where the fossil was found. Synonyms include "Dollodon" and "Proplanicoxa".
Research on "Iguanodon" decreased during the early part of the 20th century as World Wars and the Great Depression enveloped Europe. A new species that would become the subject of much study and taxonomic controversy, "I. atherfieldensis", was named in 1925 by R. W. Hooley, for a specimen collected at Atherfield Point on the Isle of Wight.
Norman (2013) considered Paul's description of "Darwinsaurus" to be inadequate, treating "D. evolutionis" as a junior synonym of "Hypselospinus fittoni", and noting that NHMUK 1836, an associated partial skeleton from the late Barremian of the Isle of Wight, can referred to the species "Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis". In a recent SVP abstract, Karen Poole considered "Darwinsaurus" a possible junior synonym of "Huxleysaurus" based on unpublished cladistic results.
David Bruce Norman in 2013, considered Paul's description of "Mantellodon" to be inadequate, identical to that given by Paul of "Darwinsaurus" and entirely incorrect, noting that no dentary is preserved in the holotype specimen, and that the preserved forelimb elements "are gracile, carpals are not preserved, the metacarpals are elongate and slender, and a thumb spike is not preserved". Norman considered the holotype specimen of "Mantellodon carpenteri" to be referable to the species "Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis".
Regular visits to the island resulted in the find of hundreds of fossils among which several major specimens on which he, from 1900, published fourteen scientific papers. He described remains of many turtles, and named the dinosaur "Iguanodon atherfieldensis" and the pterosaur "Ornithodesmus latidens". Hooley was a member of the Hampshire Field Club & Archaeological Society at Winchester from 1890. He was one of the founders of the Isle of Wight Natural History and Archaeological Society. He was an honorary curator of the Winchester Museum between 1918 and 1923.
Mantellisaurus is a genus of dinosaur formerly known as "Iguanodon atherfieldensis" that lived in the Barremian and possibly the early Aptian ages of the Early Cretaceous Period of Europe. Its remains are known from Belgium (Bernissart), England and possibly Germany. The new genus was erected by Gregory Paul in 2007. According to Paul, it is more lightly built than "Iguanodon" and more closely related to "Ouranosaurus", making "Iguanodon" in its traditional sense paraphyletic. It is known from many complete and almost complete skeletons. The genus name honours Gideon Mantell, the discoverer of "Iguanodon". "Mantellisaurus" lived during the Early Cretaceous in what is now England.
Specimen IRSNB 1551 from the Sainte-Barbe Clays, Belgium, became the first ever mounted skeleton of a non-avian dinosaur made primarily out of actual bone when put on display by Louis Dollo in 1891. This specimen was originally assigned to "Iguanodon mantelli", but was later thought to pertain to "Iguanodon atherfieldensis". The specimen was assigned to its own genus and species, "Dollodon bampingi", by Gregory S. Paul in 2008. The genus was named after Dollo, who first described the remains, and the specific name was in honour of popular science writer Daniel Bamping, who assisted Paul in his investigations.
The holotype and only specimen of "Proplanicoxa", BMNH R 8649, is composed of thirteen dorsals, a sacrum with ilia, parts of the pubis and ischium. The fossils were found in 1916 by Reginald Walter Hooley on the Isle of Wight from the upper Wessex Formation of England. BMNH R 8649 was originally assigned to "Vectisaurus valdensis" Hulke 1879 (="Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis") by Galton in 1976. The specimen was assigned to its own genus and species by Kenneth Carpenter and Yusuke Ishida in 2010, and the type species is "Proplanicoxa galtoni". The generic name means “before” ("pro" in Greek) + "Planicoxa" in reference to the postacetabular process of the ilium trending towards the horizontal as seen even stronger in "Planicoxa", and the specific name honors Peter Galton. It may be synonymous with "Mantellisaurus".
Unlike other purported herding dinosaurs (especially hadrosaurs and ceratopsids), there is no evidence that "Iguanodon" was strongly sexually dimorphic, with one sex appreciably different from the other. At one time, it was suggested that the Bernissart "I." "mantelli", or "I. atherfieldensis" ("Dollodon" and "Mantellisaurus", respectively) represented a sex, possibly female, of the larger and more robust, possibly male, "I. bernissartensis". However, this is not supported today. A 2017 analysis showed that "I. bernissartensis" does exhibit a large level of individual variation in both its limbs (scapula, humerus, thumb claw, ilium, ischium, femur, tibia) and spinal column (axis, sacrum, tail vertebrae). Additionally, this analysis found that individuals of "I. bernissartensis" generally seemed to fall into two categories based on whether their tail vertebrae bore a furrow on the bottom, and whether their thumb claws were large or small.
"Iguanodon" was not part of the initial work of the dinosaur renaissance that began with the description of "Deinonychus" in 1969, but it was not neglected for long. David B. Weishampel's work on ornithopod feeding mechanisms provided a better understanding of how it fed, and David B. Norman's work on numerous aspects of the genus has made it one of the best-known dinosaurs. In addition, a further find of numerous "Iguanodon" skeletons, in Nehden, Nordrhein-Westphalen, Germany, has provided evidence for gregariousness in this genus, as the animals in this areally restricted find appear to have been killed by flash floods. At least 15 individuals, from long, have been found here, although at least some of them are gracile iguanodontians and belong to the related "Mantellisaurus" or "Dollodon" (described as "I. atherfieldensis", at that time believed to be another species of "Iguanodon").
Reginald was born in Southampton, the son of William Hooley, a wealthy gentleman. In 1889 R.W. Hooley began to work for "Godrich & Petman", wine merchants, and later in life became managing director of that firm. Living in Portswood, in 1912 he married E.E. Holden and moved to Winchester. In 1913 he was elected a member of the Winchester city council. Hooley made his most famous finds in 1889 and 1914 when two iguanodontid skeletons were exposed by erosion at the cliffs. In 1904 the remains of "Ornithodesmus" were uncovered by a cliff fall. After Hooley's death, the paper naming "Iguanodon atherfieldensis" was posthumously published and most of the "Hooley Collection", over 1330 specimens, was, in 1924. acquired by the British Museum of Natural History which displays the iguanodontid skeletons in the Dinosaur Hall. In 1926 the extinct plant "Hooleya" was named after him.
A more complete specimen of similar animal was discovered in a quarry in Maidstone, Kent, in 1834 (lower Lower Greensand Formation), which Mantell soon acquired. He was led to identify it as an "Iguanodon" based on its distinctive teeth. The Maidstone slab was utilized in the first skeletal reconstructions and artistic renderings of "Iguanodon", but due to its incompleteness, Mantell made some mistakes, the most famous of which was the placement of what he thought was a horn on the nose. The discovery of much better specimens in later years revealed that the horn was actually a modified thumb. Still encased in rock, the Maidstone skeleton is currently displayed at the Natural History Museum in London. The borough of Maidstone commemorated this find by adding an "Iguanodon" as a supporter to their coat of arms in 1949. This specimen has become linked with the name "I. mantelli", a species named in 1832 by Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer in place of "I. anglicus", but it actually comes from a different formation than the original "I. mantelli"/"I. anglicus" material. The Maidstone specimen, also known as Gideon Mantell's "Mantel-piece", and formally labelled NHMUK 3741 was subsequently excluded from "Iguanodon". It is classified as "cf." "Mantellisaurus" by McDonald (2012); as cf. "Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis" by Norman (2012); and made the holotype of a separate species "Mantellodon carpenteri" by Paul (2012).
The type specimen of "M. carpenteri" was discovered in a quarry in Maidstone, Kent, owned by William Harding Benstead, in February 1834 (lower Lower Greensand Formation). In June 1834 it was acquired for £ 25 by scientist Gideon Mantell. He was led to identify it as an "Iguanodon" based on its distinctive teeth. The Maidstone slab was utilized in the first skeletal reconstructions and artistic renderings of "Iguanodon", but due to its incompleteness, Mantell made some mistakes, the most famous of which was the placement of what he thought was a horn on the nose. The discovery of much better specimens of "Iguanodon bernissartensis" in later years revealed that the horn was actually a modified thumb. Still encased in rock, the Maidstone skeleton is currently displayed at the Natural History Museum in London. The borough of Maidstone commemorated this find by adding an "Iguanodon" as a supporter to their coat of arms in 1949. This specimen has become linked with the name "I. mantelli", a species named in 1832 by Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer in place of "I. anglicus", but it actually comes from a different formation than the original "I. mantelli"/"I. anglicus" material. The Maidstone specimen, also known as Gideon Mantell's "Mantel-piece", and formally labelled NHMUK 3741 was subsequently excluded from "Iguanodon". It is classified as "cf." "Mantellisaurus" by McDonald (2012); as cf. "Mantellisaurus atherfieldensis" by David Bruce Norman (2012); and made the holotype of a separate genus and species "Mantellodon carpenteri" by Gregory S. Paul (2012). The generic name combines Mantell's name with a Greek "odon", "tooth", analogous to "Iguanodon". The specific name honours Kenneth Carpenter for his work on dinosaurs in general and iguandonts in particular.