Synonyms for baueri or Related words with baueri

plumosa              papuana              hirtella              dilatata              delicatula              gracilipes              mucronata              lilacina              ramulosa              rubicunda              debilis              connata              platycarpa              gracillima              caliginosa              decussata              congesta              costata              calcicola              arcuata              complanata              velutinus              gardneri              oreophila              ferruginea              setigera              interrupta              physcia              amoenum              caesia              lehmannii              colorata              virgata              calcarata              cuneifolia              cincta              brassii              propinqua              filamentosa              pulchellum              comptonii              spathulata              amoena              setacea              lucasii              indecora              intertexta              discoidea              capitellata              heterodermia             



Examples of "baueri"
"Eimeria baueri" - crucian carp ("Carassius carassius")
Psilogramma baueri is a moth of the family Sphingidae. It is known from the Moluccas.
Galeandra baueri is a species of orchid. It is the type species of the genus "Galeandra".
Paraplatyptilia baueri is a moth of the Pterophoridae family. It is found in North America, including California.
In 1891, German botanist Otto Kuntze challenged the generic name "Banksia" L.f., on the grounds that the name "Banksia" had previously been published in 1775 as "Banksia" J.R.Forst & G.Forst, referring to the genus now known as "Pimelea". Kuntze proposed "Sirmuellera" as an alternative, republishing "B. baueri" as "Sirmuellera baueri". The challenge failed, and "Banksia" L.f. was formally conserved.
Under Brown's taxonomic arrangement, "B. baueri" was placed in subgenus "Banksia verae", the "True Banksias", because the inflorescence is a typical "Banksia" flower spike. "Banksia verae" was renamed "Eubanksia" by Stephan Endlicher in 1847, and demoted to sectional rank by Carl Meissner in his 1856 classification. Meissner further divided "Eubanksia" into four series, with "B. baueri" placed in series "Quercinae" on the basis of its toothed leaves. When George Bentham published his 1870 arrangement in "Flora Australiensis", he discarded Meissner's series, replacing them with four sections. "B. baueri" was placed in "Cyrtostylis", a heterogeneous section containing 13 species that did not readily fit elsewhere. This arrangement would stand for over a century.
Some varieties serve as foodplants for butterfly species such as Bauer's dotted blue ("Euphilotes baueri") and Ord Mountain metalmark ("Apodemia mormo dialeuca").
Bebearia baueri is a butterfly in the Nymphalidae family. It is found in the Republic of the Congo, Gabon and southern Cameroon.
Oncidium baueri is a species of orchid native to Costa Rica and to South America as far south as Bolivia and Brazil.
The genus "Genoplesium" was first formally described by Robert Brown in 1810 and the description was published in "Prodromus Florae Novae Hollandiae". The type species is "G. baueri".
Some "Oncidium" orchids are very long : "Oncidum altissimum" and "Oncidium baueri" can grow to a height of 5 m, while "Oncidum sarcodes" can reach 3 m.
The bar-tailed godwit migrates in flocks to coastal East Asia, Alaska, Australia, Africa, northwestern Europe and New Zealand, where the sub-species "Limosa lapponica baueri" is called 'Kūaka' in Māori.
Lasiopetalum baueri, commonly known as slender velvet bush, is a common shrub of the mallow family. It was first described by Joachim Steetz in 1806. It was named for the 19th century botanical artist Ferdinand Bauer.
Clade III a: "D. humifusa SW, D. ceratocarpa SW, D. pinifolia SW, D. ericoides SWEr, D. D.ivaricata SW, D. caespitosa SW, D. tepperi SE, D. hexandra SE, D. stenophylla MT,D. pachyneura Er, D. rigidia Er, D. baueri SEEr."
"R. baueri" occurs on Norfolk Island and the Kermadec Islands northeast of New Zealand; the Kermadec Islands population, formerly separated as "R. cheesemanii", was included in "R. baueri" in 2005 after comparison revealed no significant differences. "R. sapida", known as the nikau palm, is the only palm native to mainland New Zealand, and is found in lowland forests on the North Island, in coastal areas of the South Island as far south as Banks Peninsula, and on the Chatham Islands at 44°S. "R. sapida" thus has the southernmost range of any palm genus.
The larvae feed on "Acronychia baueri", "Acronychia laevis", "Euodia micrococca", "Halfordia drupifera" and "Halfordia kendack". They mine the leaves of their host plant. The mine consists of an elongate, gall-like blotch in the deeper tissues of the leaf, rather inflated and showing only as a slightly convex swelling on both leaf surfaces.
Grevillea baueri, commonly known as Bauer's grevillea, is a low-growing shrub which is endemic to the coastal ranges of south-eastern New South Wales in Australia. It usually grows up to 1 metre in height and 2 metres in width.Flowers are produced in late winter and spring. These have a red perianth with a cream tip and a green-tipped red style.
In 2002, a molecular study by Austin Mast again showed the three eastern species to form a group, but they were only distantly related to other members of the series "Banksia". Instead, they formed a sister group to a large group comprising the series Prostratae, Ochraceae, Tetragonae (including "Banksia elderiana"), "Banksia lullfitzii" and "Banksia baueri".
In 2002, a molecular study by Austin Mast again showed the three eastern species to form a group, but they were only distantly related to other members of the series "Banksia". Instead, they formed a sister group to a large group comprising the series Prostratae, Ochraceae, Tetragonae (including "Banksia elderiana"), "Banksia lullfitzii" and "Banksia baueri".
"Lasiopetalum baueri" can be readily grown in dryer climates in well drained soils and sunny aspects, and is used as a windbreak or hedge. It responds well to being pruned. It was introduced into cultivation in England in 1868. The dried flowers are long-lasting and have potential as a cut flower.