Synonyms for beet_beta_vulgaris or Related words with beet_beta_vulgaris

subsp_maritima              paralias              portulacoides              tripolium              buckthorns              drimia_maritima              halimione              purslane              maritimum              thrift_armeria_maritima              sesuvium_portulacastrum              mertensia_maritima              crambe_maritima              prostratum              honckenya              sesuvium              peploides              arrowgrass_triglochin              aster_tripolium              rumex_acetosa              maritima              seablite              glaux              mayweed              maritimus              scilla_verna              mouse_ear_cerastium              milkwort              spring_squill              campion_silene              salicornia              soldanella              coccoloba_uvifera              hieracium_pilosella              storksbill              artemisia_maritima              thyme_thymus              caulerpa              diffusum              halimium              setaria              glomeratum              aster_aster              coronopus              arrowgrass              horseshoe_vetch_hippocrepis_comosa              sandwort              limonium              celery_apium              nasturtium_officinale             



Examples of "beet_beta_vulgaris"
A beetin is a ribosome-inactivating protein found in the leaves of the sugar Beet, "beta vulgaris" L. Beetins are type-I (single-chain) proteins.
It feeds on several plants of the Chenopodiaceae family; particularly on beet "Beta vulgaris", on "Chenopodium album", on "C. glaucum" and on "Atriplex hortensis".
Sugar beet is the Altissima Group of cultivars of the common beet ("Beta vulgaris"). It is a plant whose root contains a high concentration of sucrose and it is grown commercially for sugar production. Sugar beets and other beet cultivars, such as beetroot and chard, are members of "Beta vulgaris" subsp. "vulgaris" and share a common wild ancestor, the Sea beet ("Beta vulgaris" subsp. "maritima").
Betaenone A, like other betaenones (B and C), is a secondary metabolite isolated from the fungus "Pleospora betae", a plant pathogen. Of the seven phytotoxins isolated in fungal leaf spots from sugar beet ("Beta vulgaris"), it showed 73% growth inhibition.
The cultivation of plants that give textile fibers (Cannabis sativa, Linum usitatissimum), the cultivation of sugar beet ("Beta vulgaris"), cereals, potatoes, orchards, vineyards and olive groves have almost replaced the natural vegetation.
Gweal is a small rocky island consisting of two hills linked by a boulder beach, just off the west coast of Bryher and is an occasional pupping site for grey seal. Plants recorded are sea beet ("Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima"), rock sea–spurry ("Spergularia rupicola"), common scurvygrass ("Cochlearia officinalis"), thrift ("Armeria maritima") and tree mallow ("Lavatera arborea").
The name "betalain" comes from the Latin name of the common beet ("Beta vulgaris"), from which betalains were first extracted. The deep red color of beets, bougainvillea, amaranth, and many cactuses results from the presence of betalain pigments. The particular shades of red to purple are distinctive and unlike that of anthocyanin pigments found in most plants.
It has around 570 inhabitants, grouped in three villages: Cimanes de la Vega, Bariones de la Vega and Lordemanos de la Vega. Agriculture is the main activity. Irrigation is important as the land is dry. The main crops are beet ("Beta vulgaris"), maize ("Zea mays") and cattle fodder.
During storms the sea can wash over the island and there is a shingle community of plants with tree mallow ("Lavatera arborea"), sea curled dock ("Rumex cripus littoreus") and "Atriplex" sp. The only other species recorded are sea beet ("Beta vulgaris" subsp. "maritima"), common scurvygrass ("Cochlearia officinalis"), "orache" sp, and rock sea-spurry ("Spergularia rupicola").
On the north-west side of the island there is an area of maritime grassland with abundant thrift ("Armeria maritima"), sea beet ("Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima") and tree mallow ("Lavatera arborea"). Also on the north side and directly opposite Round Island, Issac North (1850) found a chasm richly covered in sea spleenwort ("Asplenium marinum").
Some species, such as spinach ("Spinacia oleracea") or forms of beet ("Beta vulgaris") (beetroot, chard), are used as vegetables. Forms of "Beta vulgaris" include fodder beet ("Mangelwurzel") and sugar beet. The seeds of "Amaranthus", lamb's quarters ("Chenopodium berlandieri"), quinoa ("Chenopodium quinoa") and kañiwa ("Chenopodium pallidicaule") are edible and are used as pseudocereals.
Common scab is a plant disease of root and tuber crops caused by a small number of "Streptomyces" species, specifically "S. scabies", "S. acidiscabies", "S. turgidiscabies" and others. Common scab mainly affects potato ("Solanum tuberosum"), but can also cause disease on radish ("Raphanus sativus"), parsnip ("Pastinaca sativa"), beet ("Beta vulgaris"), and carrot ("Daucus carota"). This plant disease is found wherever these vegetables are grown.
Betaenone C, like other betaenones (A and B), is a secondary metabolite isolated from the fungus "Pleospora betae", a plant pathogen. Of the seven phytotoxins isolated in fungal leaf spots from sugar beet ("Beta vulgaris"), it showed 89% growth inhibition. Betaenone C has been shown to act by inhibiting RNA and protein synthesis.
The original betaine, "N","N","N"-trimethylglycine, was named after its discovery in sugar beet ("Beta vulgaris" subsp. "vulgaris") in the 19th century. It is a small "N"-trimethylated amino acid, existing in zwitterionic form at neutral pH. This substance is now often called "glycine betaine" to distinguish it from other betaines that are widely distributed in microorganisms, plants and animals.
Beta is a genus in the flowering plant family Amaranthaceae. The best known member is the common beet, "Beta vulgaris", but several other species are recognised. Almost all have common names containing the word "beet". Wild "Beta" species can be found throughout the Atlantic coast of Europe, the Mediterranean coastline, the Near East, and parts of Asia including India.
The sea beet, "Beta vulgaris" subsp. "maritima" ((L.) Arcangeli.), is a member of the family Amaranthaceae, previously of the Chenopodiaceae. Carl Linnaeus first described "Beta vulgaris" in 1753; in the second edition of "Species Plantarum" in 1762, he divided the species into wild and cultivated varieties, giving the name "Beta maritima" to the wild taxon.
Both nymphs and adults of this small insect is considered a very destructive pests on field crops and vegetables crops grown in greenhouses. They have a very broad host plants range, mainly broad bean ("Vicia faba"), green bean ("Phaseolus vulgaris"), pea ("Pisum sativum"), potato ("Solanum tuberosum"), tomato ("Solanum lycopersicum"), aubergine ("Solanum melongena") and cucumber ("Cucumis sativus"), as well as sugar beet ("Beta vulgaris") and cotton (genus "Gossypium").
The larvae are about 30 mm long, have three pairs of prolegs and are usually green with whitish markings. They feed on a wide variety of low-growing plants and have been recorded on over 200 different species including crops such as the garden pea ("Pisum sativum"), sugar beet ("Beta vulgaris") and cabbage ("Brassica oleracea"). They can reduce crop yields by damaging leaves and are often considered to be a pest.
Beet ("Beta vulgaris") has an immense economic importance as sugar crop (Sugar beet), and a great importance as a vegetable (Chard, Beetroot), and as fodder plant (Mangelwurzel). This species is also used as medicinal plant, ornamental plant, dye and as renewable resource. It is the crop species with the highest economical value in the order Caryophyllales. Therefore, the members of Betoideae, especially "Beta" and "Patellifolia", are interesting as Crop wild relatives.
Beet ("Beta vulgaris") has an immense economic importance as sugar crop (Sugar beet), and a great importance as a vegetable (Chard, Beetroot), and as fodder plant (Mangelwurzel). This species is also used as medicinal plant, ornamental plant, dye and as renewable resource. It is the crop species with the highest economical value in the order Caryophyllales. Therefore the members of "Beta" and the related genus "Patellifolia" are interesting as Crop wild relatives.