Synonyms for beichlingen or Related words with beichlingen

quadt              toerring              obersontheim              hohnstein              wiprecht              helfenstein              billigheim              bassenheim              limpurg              schwalenberg              reifferscheid              winzenburg              heilwig              formbach              schleusingen              wolfegg              rossla              rothenfels              neuenstein              hessenstein              haldensleben              burgravine              tecklenburg              nellenburg              brehna              trochtelfingen              querfurt              werdenberg              dachsburg              alsleben              lichteneck              frohburg              leisnig              freystadt              eberstein              trauttmansdorff              nostitz              thierstein              ortenburg              waldburg              liutgard              herzogtum              rappoltstein              hassegau              sausenberg              altgraf              langenstein              blankenheim              promnitz              groitzsch             



Examples of "beichlingen"
Beichlingen is a municipality in the Sömmerda district of Thuringia, Germany.
Around 1105 he married Mathilde or Luitgarde of Northeim, daughter of Kuno, count of Beichlingen, and had :
John died on 13 December 1475, exactly eleven years after his election. He died at his residence, Giebichenstein Castle. He was buried in Magdeburg Cathedral, next to his predecessor Frederick III of Beichlingen.
He married Sophie Albertine (15 December 1728 – 10 May 1807), a daughter of August Gottfried Dietrich, Count of Beichlingen and Sophie Helene, Countess of Stoecken. Louis and Sophie had three daughters:
Henry and his brother Frederick accompanied their cousin Werner, Margrave of the Nordmark, and "other excellent warriors" in their abduction of Reinhild, the mistress of Beichlingen, from her fortress at Quedlinburg. Werner was captured by the forces of the abbess, but apparently Henry and Fredrick were not charged.
Years later, after the King had banished the Countess of Cosel, Ursula returned to Dresden, where she occupied a respected position in the "Hof". The fall of Augustus II's Lord Chancellor and Lord Chamberlain ("Großkanzler") Wolf Dietrich von Beichlingen was at that time attributed to her.
Frederick was the first recorded Burggraf of Magdeburg. Frederick and his brother Henry accompanied their cousin Werner, Margrave of the Nordmark, and "other excellent warriors" in their abduction of Reinhild, the mistress of Beichlingen, from her fortress at Quedlinburg. Werner was captured by the forces of the abbess, but apparently neither Friedrick nor Henry were charged.
In 1108, Judith died. In 1110, he married Cunigunda, heiress of Beichlingen and daughter of Otto I, Margrave of Meissen. It was a double wedding, as his son Wiprecht married Cunigunda's daughter from another marriage, also Cunigunda, at the same time. His marriage with Cunigunda went childless.
In 1542, he was appointed Cathedral Dean in Cologne, after the death of his predecessor, Frederick of Beichlingen. Back to Cologne, he learned that the new Archbishop, Hermann of Wied had converted to Protestantism. Henry also converted to Protestantism and together they started spreading the new faith. The Pope then removed them both from office.
After the fall of the House of Hohenstaufen, the fortress lost its strategic importance. Rudolf of Habsburg, elected King of the Romans in 1273, ceded the premises to the Counts of Beichlingen, who from 1375 held the castle as vassals of the Wettin landgraves of Thuringia. Given in pawn to the comital House of Schwarzburg shortly afterwards and seized by the Counts of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt in 1407, the fortress was already mentioned as a ruin in the 15th century.
Werner's wife predeceased him on 13 November 1012. Werner, accompanied by his cousins Henry and Frederick, abducted Reinhild, the "mistress of Beichlingen," in November 1014. He was captured, but before he could be put on trial, was murdered at Allerstedt on 11 November 1014, "having patiently endured whatever misfortunes had hitherto come his way", according to Thietmar. He was buried beside his wife in the familial monastery of Walbeck. He left no children.
Solms was born posthumously, the third son and fifth child of Hermann Otto Erbprinz zu Solms-Hohensolms-Lich (1902-1940). His father was the heir to the fortune and legacy of the Princes zu Solms-Hohensolms-Lich, a noble family known in Germany since 1129, whose Imperial county was made a principality of the Holy Roman Empire in 1792, but mediatized under the sovereignty of the Grand Duchy of Hesse in 1806. Hermann Otto's father died while serving as a lieutenant in the German Airforce at Neuruppin on 3 July 1940. His mother, "née" Baroness Gertrude von Werthern-Beichlingen (1913-1987), was re-married in 1950 to Hans Joachim Sell of Neustettin.
When in 1168 her husband reconciled with Henry the Lion, Judith began the construction of Runneburg Castle in Weißensee. The neighbouring Counts of Beichlingen objected, and protested to Emperor Barbarossa. However, the emperor sided with his half-sister and rejected the protests. Runneburg Castle was situated halfway between Wartburg Castle and Neuenburg Castle and became the residence of the Landgraves of Thuringia. Later during the conflicts between Germany's most powerful dynasties, the strategically located Runneburg Castle became one of the most important castles in the area.
The city's independence was endangered by the ambitions of regional counts, especially by those of Hohnstein County (based in near Ilfeld), who extorted Nordhausen during the 14th century to get money. On the other hand, the debts of the Hohnstein Counts were gigantic: they owed 86 citizens of Nordhausen 5744 Mark silver in 1370. In 1306, Nordhausen allied with the two other major Thuringian cities Erfurt and Mühlhausen against the Wettins and the local counts (Hohnstein, Stolberg, Schwarzburg, Beichlingen etc.) and joined the Hanseatic League together with them in 1430. Further alliances were concluded with Goslar, Halberstadt, Quedlinburg and Aschersleben to represent urban interests against the landlords.
On 31 August 786 Charlemagne gave the village of Dorndorf and all of its belongings to Hersfeld Abbey; the abbey built the Krayenburg to protect it. The castle changed ownership repeatedly. It was owned by Graf Adam von Beichlingen, who died on 7 August 1538 and is buried in the church in Tiefenort. The Thirty Years' War started the destruction of the castle when Croatian troops (under ) captured the Krayenburg. However, it continued to play an important role in German history until the 19th century. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe visited the castle in 1782, the year he was ennobled.
Together with Oliver Tambo, Mbeki left London for Lusaka in April 1971 to take up the position of assistant secretary of the ANC's Revolutionary Council (RC). This was the first time in nine years that Mbeki was setting foot on African soil. The aim of the RC at this time was to bridge an ever-widening gap between the ANC in exile and the people back home. In Lusaka, Mbeki was housed in a secret location in Makeni, south-west of the city. Later, Mbeki moved over to work in the ANC's propaganda section. But he continued to attend RC meetings. Four months after his arrival in Lusaka, Mbeki travelled to Beichlingen to deliver a speech on behalf of the ANC's Executive Committee at the YSS summer school. This was a turning point in Mbeki's life as it was the first time he spoke on behalf of the ANC as opposed to the ANC Youth League.
It is believed that Wolfsberg Castle, like its southeastern neighbour, Questenberg Castle, was built by the counts of Beichlingen-Rothenburg around the year 1300. Around 1309, it entered into the possession of the counts of Anhalt-Bernburg, who enfeoffed the castle. The new lords of the castle ("Burgherren") were hostile towards their neighbours, the counts of Stolberg, and raided their estates. In 1320, after a legal decision in his favour, Count Henry of Stolberg took the law into his own hands and captured Wolfsberg Castle. In order to protect the estate from the claims of the House of Anhalt, he transferred it as a fief to Bishop Albert of Halberstadt and was officially enfeoffed with it on 18 December 1325 along with Erichsberg Castle.
The division of this new land in Thuringia could not be agreed upon, and on 16 July 1445 the two remaining brothers tried to partition the land between them in the Division of Altenburg. When Frederick II chose the western part and not the Margraviate of Meissen on September 26, 1445 in Leipzig, William rejected the division. On December 11 of the same year they attempted to reconcile in the monastery of Neuwerk in Halle (Saale) in what was known as the "Hallescher Machtspruch" (English: the Power Dictum of Halle). The Archbishop of Magdeburg Frederick III of Beichlingen, the Margrave Frederick II of Brandenburg and the Landgrave Ludwig II of Hesse actively participated as judges, however the two brothers failed to reach a peaceful resolution.
The site of castle Lohra had presumably already been fortified in Germanic times, being named after a possible nearby sanctuary to the goddess Lare. The complex was extended by the counts of Lare in the 11th and 12th centuries who constructed the largest castle in the southwestern foothills of the Harz mountains. The castle had varying owners until the 17th century, belonging to the counts of Lare, Beichlingen and Hohnstein. After the extinction of the latter family in 1593, the castle was to be inherited by the counts of Stolberg and Schwarzburg due to an arrangement between these families and the Hohnsteins, but was forcibly taken by the duke of Braunschweig. During the Thirty Years War, control of the castle changed several times. At the time of the Peace of Westphalia, it was occupied by the Swedes, but given to the electors of Brandenburg. In later times, the castle had lost its military significance and served as an agricultural domain in Prussia, the German Empire and the German Democratic Republic until 1977. Today, it is held by a non-profit organisation which rents the residential quarters to tourist groups and oversees the conservation and restoration of the castle. A special architectural feature is the double chapel, containing a chapel for public services on the lower floor and an additional oratory for private worship of the ruling family on the upper floor.
The division of this new land in Thuringia could not be agreed upon, and on 16 July 1445 the two remaining brothers tried to partition the land between them in the Division of Altenburg. When Frederick II chose the western part and not the Margraviate of Meissen on September 26, 1445 in Leipzig, William rejected the division. On December 11 of the same year they attempted to reconcile in the monastery of Neuwerk in Halle (Saale) in what was known as the "Hallescher Machtspruch" (English: the Power Dictat of Halle). The Archbishop of Magdeburg Frederick III of Beichlingen, the Margrave Frederick II of Brandenburg and the Landgrave Ludwig II of Hesse actively participated as judges, however the two brothers failed to reach a peaceful resolution. This split led to a war between the two brothers in 1446 known as the Saxon Brother War, or the "Sächsischer Bruderkrieg". The brothers would fight until the peace reached at Naumburg on January 27, 1451. Later, in the Treaty of Eger, elector Frederick II, Duke Wilhelm III, and the King of Bohemia George of Podebrady fixed the borders between Bohemia and Saxony. This border is still current and is one of the oldest existing borders in Europe.