Synonyms for blattidae or Related words with blattidae

blattellidae              tachimidae              oestridae              curculionidae              aphididae              bruchidae              fulgoroidae              cicadidae              bladberidae              membracidae              phylloxeridae              aphidiidae              anthribidae              trichogrammatidae              muscidae              cicadellidae              cleridae              coccinellidae              cixiidae              psoroptidae              fulgoroidea              tenebrionidae              cicindelidae              aleyrodidae              alloxystidae              longidoridae              culicidae              elateridae              adelgidae              polyphagidae              curculionoidea              forficulidae              delphacidae              vespidae              cantharidae              pyemotidae              psyllidae              apidae              silphidae              mydidae              asterolecamidae              pyralidae              heteroderidae              brachycera              thripidae              issidae              anguinidae              angstidae              aphelinidae              stratiomyidae             



Examples of "blattidae"
Blattidae is a cockroaches family in the order Blattodea containing several of the most common household cockroaches.
The Herpomycetaceae are a family of fungi in the order Laboulbeniales. Taxa have a widespread distribution, and are ectoparasitic or epibiotic on cockroaches (family "Blattidae").
Polyzosteria is a genus of around fifteen species of cockroaches in the Blattidae family. Some of these Australian insects are attractively marked, such as "Polyzosteria mitchelli". The type species of the group is the Botany Bay cockroach.
The brown cockroach ("Periplaneta brunnea") is a species of cockroach in the family Blattidae. It is probably originally native to Africa, but today it has a circumtropical distribution, having been widely introduced. In cooler climates it can only survive indoors, and it is considered a household pest.
The aboriginal cockroach ("Periplaneta aboriginea") is a species of cockroach belonging to the family Blattidae. Unlike the related (and misnamed) Australian cockroach, this is an Australian native endemic, only recorded from the northern part of the Great Dividing Range in Queensland, as far north as the Cape York Peninsula.
She travelled to the ruins of New York, seeking the blood of the Fallen Angels. Here she encountered Metatron (named after the angel), and met Blattidae (named after the cockroach), who told her of an ancient Prophecy that detailed her life history and told of her return to Goddesshood. In her battle with Metatron, she began to have doubts about whether she would ever be more than just a common vampire, but after beating him she realised that part of the problem was that she had been wasting her time with lesser creatures like him and should have been aiming higher. She left New York to Blattidae, most of her army having been crucified by Metatron, and began plotting her Ascension.
Many species of Cynipidae were described by von Schlechtendal or their generation sequence was clarified. His collection of Cynipidae with their galls is shared by the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin and the Zoological Institute of the University of Halle-Wittenberg which also conserves his collections of Blattidae and Lepidoptera. Dietrich von Schlechtendal was an honour member of the Entomological Society of Halle and a member of the Stettin Entomological Society.
Two Evaniidae species, "Evania appendigaster" and "Prosevania fuscipes", have achieved an essentially worldwide distribution nowadays, having been introduced along with various Blattidae species of genera "Blatta" and "Periplaneta". While they do feed on insects that are considered pests, they rarely attain population sizes sufficient to act as effective biocontrol agents. As cockroaches are typically more abundant in and around human settlements, Evaniidae are a regular sight in such habitat where many other wasps are absent, and are frequently encountered in buildings looking for prey. The adults drink nectar from flowers and may sting humans leaving a stinger behind in the wound.
The grey-necked rockfowl feeds on a diverse range of invertebrates and small vertebrates, though plant matter does constitute a major part of its diet. It is known to eat beetles, including weevils, rove beetles, and click beetles from the genus "Psephus", butterflies, ants from the genera "Dorylus" and "Pachycondyla", grasshoppers, cockroaches from the family Blattidae, earwigs, caterpillars, ant-lions, silverfish, and earthworms. Small lizards, frogs, snails, and slugs are also eaten, as are crabs from the genus "Potamon", fruits, flower buds, mosses, and leaves. Fish have also been identified as a prey item in Nigeria. At at least one nesting site, it relies heavily on the arthropods feeding on the bat guano near the cave for sustenance, while this behaviour has been reported to a lesser extent at other sites. It is known to regurgitate what it has eaten in pellet form. Overall, between 52 and 60 percent of the bird's diet is believed to be composed of animals. Rove beetle larvae and ants were the most frequently eaten prey in a study in Nigeria.
Velvet worms are ambush predators, hunting only by night, and are able to capture animals at least their own size, although it may take almost all of their slime-secreting capacity to capture a large prey item. They feed on almost any small invertebrates, including woodlice (Isopoda), termites (Isoptera), crickets (Gryllidae), book/bark lice (Psocoptera), cockroaches (Blattidae), millipedes and centipedes (Myriapoda), spiders (Araneae), various worms, and even large snails (Gastropoda). Depending on their size, they eat on average every one to four weeks. They are considered to be ecologically equivalent to centipedes (Chilopoda). The most energetically favourable prey are two-fifths the size of the hunting onychophoran. Ninety percent of the time involved in eating prey is spent ingesting it; re-ingestion of the slime used to trap the insect is performed while the onychophoran locates a suitable place to puncture the prey, and this phase accounts for around 8% of the feeding time, with the remaining time evenly split between examining, squirting, and injecting the prey. In some cases, chunks of the prey item are bitten off and swallowed; undigestable components take around 18 hours to pass through the digestive tract. Onychophora probably do not primarily use vision to detect their prey; although their tiny eyes do have a good image-forming capacity, their forward vision is obscured by their antennae; their nocturnal habit also limits the utility of eyesight. Air currents, formed by prey motion, are thought to be the primary mode of locating prey; the role of scent, if any, is unclear. Because it takes so long to ingest a prey item, hunting mainly happens around dusk; the onychophorans will abandon their prey at sunrise. This predatory way of life is probably a consequence of the velvet worm's need to remain moist. Due to the continual risk of desiccation, often only a few hours per day are available for finding food. This leads to a strong selection for a low cost-benefit ratio, which cannot be achieved with a herbivorous diet.
The vannus is bordered by the vannal fold, which typically occurs between the postcubitus and the first vannal vein. In Orthoptera, it usually has this position. In the forewing of Blattidae, however, the only fold in this part of the wing lies immediately before the postcubitus. In Plecoptera, the vannal fold is posterior to the postcubitus, but proximally it crosses the base of the first vannal vein. In the cicada, the vannal fold lies immediately behind the first vannal vein (lV). These small variations in the actual position of the vannal fold, however, do not affect the unity of action of the vannal veins, controlled by the flexor sclerite (3Ax), in the flexion of the wing. In the hindwings of most Orthoptera, a secondary vena dividens forms a rib in the vannal fold. The vannus is usually triangular in shape, and its veins typically spread out from the third axillary like the ribs of a fan. Some of the vannal veins may be branched, and secondary veins may alternate with the primary veins. The vannal region is usually best developed in the hindwing, in which it may be enlarged to form a sustaining surface, as in Plecoptera and Orthoptera. The great fan-like expansions of the hindwings of Acrididae are clearly the vannal regions, since their veins are all supported on the third axillary sclerites on the wing bases, though Martynov (1925) ascribes most of the fan areas in Acrididae to the jugal regions of the wings. The true jugum of the acridid wing is represented only by the small membrane (Ju) mesad of the last vannal vein. The jugum is more highly developed in some other Orthoptera, as in the Mantidae. In most of the higher insects with narrow wings, the vannus becomes reduced, and the vannal fold is lost, but even in such cases, the flexed wing may bend along a line between the postcubitus and the first vannal vein.
The vannus is bordered by the vannal fold, which typically occurs between the postcubitus and the first vannal vein. In Orthoptera it usually has this position. In the forewing of Blattidae, however, the only fold in this part of the wing lies immediately before the postcubitus. In Plecoptera the vannal fold is posterior to the postcubitus, but proximally it crosses the base of the first vannal vein. In the cicada the vannal fold lies immediately behind the first vannal vein (lV). These small variations in the actual position of the vannal fold, however, do not affect the unity of action of the vannal veins, controlled by the flexor sclerite (3Ax), in the flexion of the wing. In the hindwings of most Orthoptera a secondary vena dividens forms a rib in the vannal fold. The vannus is usually triangular in shape, and its veins typically spread out from the third axillary like the ribs of a fan. Some of the vannal veins may be branched, and secondary veins may alternate with the primary veins. The vannal region is usually best developed in the hindwing, in which it may be enlarged to form a sustaining surface, as in Plecoptera and Orthoptera. The great fanlike expansions of the hindwings of Acrididae are clearly the vannal regions, since their veins are all supported on the third axillary sclerites on the wing bases, though Martynov (1925) ascribes most of the fan areas in Acrididae to the jugal regions of the wings. The true jugum of the acridid wing is represented only by the small membrane (Ju) mesad of the last vannal vein. The jugum is more highly developed in some other Polyneoptera, as in the Mantidae. In most of the higher insects with narrow wings the vannus becomes reduced, and the vannal fold is lost, but even in such cases the flexed wing may bend along a line between the postcubitus and the first vannal vein.