Synonyms for bogh or Related words with bogh

onnen              einum              heuy              staven              gekk              einni              nerk              lepiku              dvoru              leten              bilmem              tumnob              segir              fajtor              gurra              plaun              roung              hende              fyrsta              sanoi              ferna              vald              goet              ljubio              sabornost              vennene              eigin              smukke              phdau              hicazkar              borale              tunna              laik              treba              andaet              pornpit              pongro              hoeng              digni              viltu              poun              vragu              vildu              hausten              doun              andeks              sjov              chuor              rustig              paljon             



Examples of "bogh"
“Mashine mashti mamdaly - nah bogh dareh nah sandaly”.
Several Danes are remembered for their contributions to daguerreotypy. While in Paris in 1848, Anton Melbye (1818–1875), a marine artist, learnt from Daguerre. Rudolph Striegler, Johan Emilius Bogh and Johan Ludvig Ussing were among those who began to specialize in portrait photography opening studios in Copenhagen and the provinces.
Karbogha sharif is a village located in a mountainous area of the union council of Hangu District, Pakistan north of tehsil thall. Karbogha's land lies between 2 opposite range of mountains, and the highest peak of Southern mountain is called "Oot Sar". The word Karbogha is derived from "Kara" and "Bogh" both words originally from the Pashto language meaning "saw" and "garden".
The design of the house is symbolic in its heightened terrace walls, the security walls and its hidden and obscured entryway. The house clearly shows the signs of someone who feels trapped or "under siege." The events of Wright's personal life may be reflected in the design of the Balch House. Regardless, the house has a remarkable linear proportion and Wright managed to raise the eyeline with the rows of windows on the home's second floor. The home is part of a series of geometric, cubic homes with overhanging, flat roofs designed by Wright in the early 20th century. The first was the Laura Gale House in Oak Park, Illinois, followed by the Oscar B. Balch House, also in Oak Park, Coonley Kindergarten, the Bogh House and then the Bach House.
The Bach House is one of the homes Wright designed after his 1911 return from Europe still extant in the city of Chicago. The home is part of a series of geometric, cubic homes with overhanging, flat roofs designed by Wright in the early 20th century. These details were first published by Wright in a 1907 "Ladies Home Journal" article. The first was the Laura Gale House in Oak Park, Illinois, followed by the Oscar Balch House, also in Oak Park, Coonley Kindergarten, the Bogh House and then the Bach House. Of the houses of this type in Chicago, with cubic masses and a slab roof, the Bach House is the only one left standing.
The first preserved widely acknowledged mention of Bosnia is in "De Administrando Imperio", a politico-geographical handbook written by the Byzantine emperor Constantine VII in the mid-10th century (between 948 and 952) describing the "small land" (χωρίον in Greek) of "Bosona" (Βοσώνα). The name is believed to have been derived from the hydronym of the river Bosna coursing through the Bosnian heartland. According to philologist Anton Mayer the name "Bosna" could be derived from Illyrian "Bass-an-as" which would be a diversion of the Proto-Indo-European root "bos" or "bogh", meaning "the running water". According to English medievalist William Miller the Slavic settlers in Bosnia "adapted the Latin designation [...] Basante, to their own idiom by calling the stream Bosna and themselves "Bosniaks" [...]".
Several studies describe the use of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti-"Ascaris" antibodies in the sera of swine. In this regard, the use of different adult and larval extracts or excretory/secretory products and some purified adult proteins have been evaluated (Bogh et al., 1994; Frontera et al., 2003b; Lind et al., 1993; Urban and Romanowski, 1985; Yoshihara et al., 1993). Although most of these tests have shown to be effective in diagnosing "A. suum" infection, no apparent steps were taken or proposed for future practical application of the developed ELISA’s. Moreover, the studies described above made use of antigen mixtures instead of specific, purified antigens, increasing the likelihood that antibodies to antigens of other pathogens could cross-react.