Synonyms for borovichsky_uyezd or Related words with borovichsky_uyezd

starorussky_uyezd              porkhovsky_uyezd              tikhvinsky_uyezd              novgorodsky_uyezd              kudeversky_district              povenetsky              lodeynopolsky_uyezd              vesyegonsky_uyezd              seryozhinsky              kalyazinsky              gdovsky_uyezd              kargopolsky_uyezd              kashinsky              belgorod_governorate              velikoluksky              velsky_uyezd              yegoryevsky              idritsky              kadnikovsky_uyezd              seryodkinsky              petergofsky              zubtsovsky              gryazovetsky              dvinsky              yemetsky              novoladozhsky              roslyatino              varzuzhskaya              vologda_okrug              kovdskaya              dedovichsky              velikoustyugsky              utorgoshsky              kasplyansky              kandalakshsky              staritsky              konchansky              pskov_okrug              gorodetsk              ustyuzhensky_uyezd              novorzhevsky              karamyshevsky              shushinsky              sebezhsky              yefimovsky              vologda_viceroyalty              cherepovetsky_uyezd              brusovo              yelanets              maryovo             



Examples of "borovichsky_uyezd"
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1773, Borovichsky Uyezd was established. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and Borovichsky Uyezd was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, which was a part of Borovichsky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate. Much of the current territory of the district was a part of Nikolo-Moshenskaya Volost of Borovichsky Uyezd.
The Msta River was an important waterway since at least the 10th century, since it connected Novgorod with the basins of the Volga and Northern Dvina Rivers. In 947 in particular, Olga of Kiev founded a number of "pogosts" on the river. In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the territory was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1770, Borovichi was chartered, and in 1773, Borovichsky Uyezd was established. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished and Borovichsky Uyezd was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, which was a part of Borovichsky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
The village of Ugol () was first mentioned in a chronicle in 1495. The development of the area started in 1851 when Uglovka became a railway station on the Nikolayevskaya Railway which connected Moscow and Saint Petersburg. Uglovka developed first as a settlement serving the railway stations, and eventually the limestone extraction started. In the beginning of the 20th century, it was a part of Borovyonskaya Volost of Valdaysky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate. In 1921, it was transferred to Shegrinskaya Volost of Borovichsky Uyezd.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate was split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the area, which was part of Borovichsky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate.
Settlements located in the current area of Okulovsky district were first mentioned in chronicles in 1495 as belonging to Derevskaya "pyatina". However, the settlement of Okulovka has only been known since 1851 and appeared in connection with the construction of the Nikolayevskaya Railway which connected Moscow and St. Petersburg. Okulovka developed first as a settlement serving the railway stations and eventually industries proliferated. It initially was a part of Borovichsky Uyezd in Novgorod Governorate. In the beginning of the 20th century, it was the administrative center of Okulovskaya Volost of Malovishersky Uyezd in Novgorod Governorate.
In August 1927, the governorates and uyezds were abolished. Borovichsky District, with the administrative center in the town of Borovichi, was established within Borovichi Okrug of Leningrad Oblast effective October 1, 1927. It included parts of Borovichskaya, Vasilyevskaya, Volokskaya, and Opechenskaya Volosts of former Borovichsky Uyezd. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. The town of Borovichi was initially subordinated to the district, but from 1930 it became a town under oblast jurisdiction. On July 5, 1944, Borovichsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast, where it remained ever since.
In August 1927, the governorates and uyezds were abolished. Moshenskoy District, with the administrative center in the "selo" of Moshenskoye, was established within Borovichi Okrug of Leningrad Oblast effective October 1, 1927. It included parts of former Borovichsky Uyezd. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. On September 20, 1931, Orekhovsky and Opechensky Districts were abolished and merged into Moshenskoy District. On January 1, 1932, a part of abolished Konchansky District was merged into Moshenskoy District. On August 3, 1939, Opechensky District, merged into Moshenskoy District in 1931, was restored. On July 5, 1944, Moshenskoy District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast, where it remained ever since with a brief interruption between 1963 and 1965. On February 1, 1963, the district was abolished in the course of the abortive Nikita Khrushchev's administrative reform and merged into Borovichsky Rural District. On January 12, 1965, Moshenskoy District was re-established.
In the course of the administrative reform carried out in 1708 by Peter the Great, the area was included into Ingermanland Governorate (known since 1710 as Saint Petersburg Governorate). In 1727, separate Novgorod Governorate split off. In 1776, the area was transferred to Novgorod Viceroyalty. In 1796, the viceroyalty was abolished, and the Nikolo-Moshenskaya Volost of Borovichsky Uyezd, was transferred to Novgorod Governorate. On August 1, 1927, the uyezds were abolished, and Moshenskoy District was established, with the center in Moshenskoye. The district belonged to Borovichi Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. On July 23, 1930 the okrugs were abolished, and the districts became directly subordinate to the oblast. On July 5, 1944, Moshenskoy District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast.
In the end of the 19th century, Lyubytino, then known as the "selo" of Beloye, was the center of Belskaya Volost of Borovichsky Uyezd, Novgorod Governorate. On August 1, 1927, the uyezds were abolished, and Belsky District was established, with the center in Beloye. The district belonged to Borovichi Okrug of Leningrad Oblast. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts became directly subordinate to the oblast. On March 11, 1931, the district center was renamed to Lyubytino, and the district was renamed into Lyubytinsky District. On July 5, 1944, Lyubytinsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast and has remained there ever since, with a brief interruption between 1963 and 1965, when the district was abolished as a part of aborted Khrushchyov administrative reform.
In August 1927, the governorates and uyezds were abolished. Belsky District, with the administrative center in the "selo" of Beloye, was established within Borovichi Okrug of Leningrad Oblast effective October 1, 1927. It included a part of former Borovichsky Uyezd and a minor part of former Malovishersky Uyezd. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. On March 11, 1931, the administrative center of the district was renamed Lyubytino and the district itself was renamed Lyubytinsky. On July 5, 1944, Lyubytinsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast, where it remained ever since, with a brief interruption in 1963–1964. On February 1, 1963, the district was abolished in the course of the Nikita Khrushchev's administrative reform and split between Borovichsky District and the territory of the town of Borovichi. On February 14, 1964, Lyubytinsky Rural District was established from parts of Borovichsky and Pestovsky Rural Districts. On January 12, 1965, Lyubytinsky Rural District was transformed into a regular district.
In August 1927, the governorates and uyezds were abolished. Okulovsky District, with the administrative center in the settlement of Okulovka, was established within Borovichi Okrug of Leningrad Oblast effective October 1, 1927. It included parts of former Borovichskaya Volost of Borovichsky Uyezd, Lokotskaya Volost of Valdaysky Uyezd, and Okulovskaya and Sukhlovskaya Volosts of Malovishersky Uyezd. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. On September 20, 1931, Torbinsky District was abolished and merged into Okulovsky District. On January 1, 1932, a part of abolished Uglovsky District was merged into Okulovsky District. Okulovsky District was not occupied by German troops during World War II; however, being adjacent to the front line, it played an important role. On July 5, 1944, Okulovsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast, where it remained ever since. On February 1, 1963, the district was transformed into Okulovsky Rural District in the course of the Nikita Khrushchev's abortive administrative reform. This was reverted on January 12, 1965. In the meanwhile, on December 11, 1964, the urban-type settlements of Okulovka and Parakhino-Poddubye were merged to form the town of Okulovka, which became the administrative center of Okulovsky District.
In August 1927, the governorates and uyezds were abolished. Minetsky District, with the administrative center in the "selo" of Mintsy, was established within Borovichi Okrug of Leningrad Oblast effective October 1, 1927. It included Kusheverskaya and Minetskaya Volosts, and a part of Konehanskaya Volost of Borovichsky Uyezd of Novgorod Governorate, as well as a part of Anisimovskaya Volost of Tikhvinsky Uyezd of Cherepovets Governorate. On July 23, 1930, the okrugs were abolished, and the districts were directly subordinated to the oblast. On June 8, 1931, the district's administrative center was transferred to the railway station of Khvoynaya, and the district was renamed Khvoyninsky. On January 1, 1932, a part of abolished Konchansky and Pikalyovsky Districts was merged into Khvoyninsky District. On July 5, 1944, Khvoyninsky District was transferred to newly established Novgorod Oblast, where it remained ever since with a brief interruption between 1963 and 1965. In the course of the abortive administrative reform by Nikita Khrushchev, the district was abolished on December 10, 1962 and merged into Pestovsky Rural District. On December 22, 1962, Khvoyninsky Industrial District was established. On December 11, 1964, Pestovo was granted town status. On January 12, 1965, a part of Khvoyninsky Industrial District was transferred to Lyubytinsky District and the rest was transformed into a regular district. On January 14, 1965, most of the rural territories transferred in 1962 to Pestovsky Rural District were returned to Khvoyninsky District. On August 27, 1965, several inhabited localities of Khvoyninsky District were transferred to Moshenskoy District. On April 13, 1967, several inhabited localities of Lyubytinsky District were transferred to Khvoyninsky District.