Synonyms for broadwindsor or Related words with broadwindsor

halstock              martock              bradenham              kingsteignton              beaminster              gisburn              southbourne              ellesborough              wheathampstead              fernhurst              winkleigh              cowfold              woodborough              swineshead              puddletown              misterton              alvington              bromyard              cuddington              adderbury              dulverton              newent              harrietsham              tadley              easebourne              ixworth              baughurst              barningham              hauxton              ombersley              kirkbymoorside              ringshall              edwinstowe              charminster              pontesbury              northleach              saxmundham              tetbury              mitcheldean              haslingfield              woodmancote              pitstone              hapton              coddenham              crewkerne              edgmond              walesby              melmerby              somersham              cliviger             



Examples of "broadwindsor"
St. Mary's Church opened in 1867, after Rev. Solomon Caesar Malan called for a chapel of ease to be built in Drimpton, which was considered part of the Broadwindsor parish at the time. Malan had been the vicar of Broadwindsor since 1845, and was also responsible for the construction of the school at Drimpton, which was built in 1874.
Broadwindsor () is a village and civil parish in the county of Dorset in South West England. It lies in the West Dorset administrative district, about west of Beaminster. Broadwindsor was formerly a liberty, containing only the parish itself. Dorset County Council estimate that in 2013 the population of the civil parish was 1,320. In the 2011 census the population of the parish, combined with that of the small parish of Seaborough to the north, was 1,378.
The village school was opened in 1842 and covers the catchment areas of Marshwood, Pilsdon, Bettiscombe, and Blackdown Ward of Broadwindsor. Secondary education is provided at Woodroffe School, Lyme Regis.
The actual summit is unwooded and bounded to the east and west by tributaries of the River Axe and to the south by the Broadwindsor col to Waddon Hill. To the north is Blagdon Hill, a subsummit on the same ridge. The B3164 from Broadwindsor crosses the southeastern flank of Conegar Hill to join the A 3066 at Whetley Cross 2 kilometres to the northeast. A small lane, branches off northwards across the western side of the hill.
Ordained a priest in 1839, his first posts were curacies at Broadwindsor and Broad Hinton. After this he held incumbencies at Beechingstoke and Marlborough. He was then appointed to the colonial episcopate, serving from 1859 to 1874.
Conegar Hill is a prominent rise, high, just north of the village of Broadwindsor in the Yeovil Scarplands, in the county of Dorset in southern England. It has a prominence of which classifies it as one of the Tumps.
Drimpton is a village in the English county of Dorset, situated in the West Dorset administrative district approximately northwest of Beaminster and southwest of Crewkerne in Somerset. It lies within the civil parish of Broadwindsor.
From Charmouth the Monarch's Way follows the South West Coast Path east along the Jurassic Coast of Dorset past St Gabriel's Mouth, over Golden Cap, the highest point on the south coast, through Seatown, over Thorncombe Beacon and past Eype's Mouth to West Bay. From here it heads north up the River Brit to Bridport, swinging west and north to Pilsdon Pen, briefly joining the Wessex Ridgeway eastwards before reaching Broadwindsor. The King hid overnight in the George Inn, Broadwindsor on 23 September 1651.
At the hill is the highest point in Dorset, closely followed by Pilsdon Pen (277 m) and Bulbarrow Hill (274 m). To the south of the hill is the Marshwood Vale. It is a National Trust property. There are two main footpaths leading up to the summit, one from the village of Broadwindsor, and one from Coombe Lane (off the B3162 between Broadwindsor and Bridport, just before the "four ash" crossroads). The Coombe Lane footpath leads to the hill via another, smaller hill, Crabb Hill, which is privately owned.
Beaminster, Bradford Abbas, Bradpole, Bridport North, Bridport South and Bothenhampton, Broadmayne, Broadwindsor, Burton Bradstock, Cam Vale, Charminster and Cerne Valley, Charmouth, Chesil Bank, Chickerell, Chideock and Symondsbury, Dorchester East, Dorchester North, Dorchester South, Dorchester West, Frome Valley, Halstock, Loders, Lyme Regis, Maiden Newton, Marshwood Vale, Netherbury, Piddle Valley, Puddletown, Queen Thorne, Sherborne East, Sherborne West, Winterborne St Martin, Yetminster.
The town is served by Stagecoach South West with buses to Yeovil via Kithill, Misterton and Haselbury Plucknett and Chard. Buses also run to Merriott, South Petherton and Ilminster and Taunton. First Somerset & Avon has service to Bridport via Beaminster and Broadwindsor, Yeovil via East Chinnock and West Coker and Chard.
In about 1640 Fuller married Eleanor, daughter of Hugh Grove of Chisenbury, Wiltshire. She died in 1641. Their son, John, baptised at Broadwindsor by his father on 6 June 1641, was afterwards of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, saw his father's "Worthies of England" through the press in 1662, and became rector of Great Wakering, Essex, where he died in 1687.
Udal was the second son, and the fourth of nine children born to William Udal and Mary-Anne Symonds, who were cousins. William (born 1802) hailed from Netherbury, where his family had lived for generations. Mary-Anne (born 1817) was from Broadwindsor. William and Mary-Anne then moved to Edgbaston, Birmingham, Staffordshire, where William became a successful businessman.
West Dorset: Beaminster, Bradford Abbas, Bradpole, Bridport North, Bridport South and Bothenhampton, Broadmayne, Broadwindsor, Burton Bradstock, Cam Vale, Charminster and Cerne Valley, Charmouth, Chesil Bank, Chickerell, Chideock and Symondsbury, Dorchester East, Dorchester North, Dorchester South, Dorchester West, Frome Valley, Halstock, Loders, Lyme Regis, Maiden Newton, Marshwood Vale, Netherbury, Piddle Valley, Puddletown, Queen Thorne, Sherborne East, Sherborne West, Winterborne St Martin, Yetminster.
Despite being part of Broadwindsor parish, Blackdown comes under the catchment area of Marshwood Primary School, three miles away, with secondary education being provided at Woodroffe School, ten miles away. Village children are entitled to free transport. The village school, situated next to the Church and now a private house, had been forced to close because of dwindling numbers, although it was reopened in World War Two to accommodate evacuees but later closed shortly after.
The village is the site of Crewkerne railway station on the Exeter- London Waterloo line served by South West Trains. It also lies at the crossroads of the A356 and A3066 roads. The village is served by the Taunton-Chard-Crewkerne-Misterton-Yeovil bus service operated by Stagecoach and Bridport-Beaminster-Broadwindsor-Misterton-Crewkerne-Yeovil bus service operated by Damory. Both services operate Monday to Saturday.
After serving various curacies, he was presented in 1845 to the living of Broadwindsor, Dorset, which he held until 1886 During this entire period he continued to augment his linguistic knowledge; he was able to preach in Georgian, on a visit which he paid to Nineveh in 1872. His translations from the Armenian, Georgian and Coptic were numerous. He applied his Chinese learning to the determination of important points connected with Chinese religion, and published a vast number of parallel passages illustrative of the "Book of Proverbs".
"Lewesdon Hill" is Crowe's poem on a hill in the western part of Dorset, on the edge of the parish of Broadwindsor, of which Tom Fuller was rector, and near Crowe's benefice of Stoke Abbott. The poet is depicted as climbing the hill-top on a May morning and describing the prospect, with its associations, which his eye surveys. The first edition, issued anonymously and dedicated to Jonathan Shipley, was published at the Clarendon Press, Oxford, in 1788. A second impression, with its authorship avowed, was demanded in the same year, and later editions, in a much enlarged form, and with several other poems, were published in 1804 and 1827.
Brother of politician Evelyn Denison, 1st Viscount Ossington, colonial administrator Sir William Denison and bishop Edward Denison, he was born at Ossington, Nottinghamshire, and educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. In 1828 he was elected fellow of Oriel; and after a few years there as a tutor, during which he was ordained and acted as curate at Cuddesdon, he became rector of Broadwindsor, Dorset (1838). He became a prebendary of Sarum in 1841 and of Wells in 1849. In 1851 he was preferred to the valuable living of East Brent, Somerset, and in the same year was made Archdeacon of Taunton.
Following the end of his Army career, Pinney took up residence at Racedown Manor, in the village of Broadwindsor, Dorset, where he lived the life of a retired country gentleman. He became a Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for the county, and served as its High Sheriff in 1923. He did not return to an active Army post, though he held the ceremonial colonelcy of the Royal Fusiliers from 1924 to 1933, as well as the honorary colonelcy of the Dorset Coastal Brigade, Royal Artillery, and the 4th (Territorial) Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment.