Synonyms for buendorf or Related words with buendorf

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Examples of "buendorf"
Buendorf has been inducted into the Minnesota Athletic Hall of Fame.
Buendorf has appeared on the television documentary "Inside the U.S. Secret Service" in 2004.
Buendorf was born November 18, 1937, in Wells, Minnesota, son of Ruby and Merle Buendorf. Buendorf graduated from Wells High School in Minnesota in 1955. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business from Mankato State University in 1959. After service in the United States Navy as a Naval Aviator, he joined the Secret Service in 1970, where he was employed for 22 years.
For his role in preventing the assassination attempt on President Ford, Buendorf was awarded the U.S. Treasury Meritorious Service Award and the United States Secret Service Valor Award.
During the years after the assassination attempt, Buendorf and President Ford maintained telephone contact every year on the September 5th anniversary of the attack. He also visited the former President and skied with him on occasion.
Larry Buendorf (born November 18, 1937) is the Chief Security Officer of the United States Olympic Committee. He is a former United States Navy aviator and Secret Service agent. He is best known for his successful intervention during an assassination attempt on then United States President Gerald Ford in 1975.
Buendorf was assigned to the Secret Service's Chicago Field Office (1970–1972), Presidential Protective Division (1972–1977) and Denver Field Office (1977–1982). He was Special Agent in Charge, Omaha Field Office (1982–1983). Later, from 1983–1993, he was Special Agent in Charge of the Protective Division and, once again, assigned to protect President Gerald Ford and Mrs. Ford.
Buendorf later became Chief Security Officer of the United States Olympic Committee in 1993 after retirement from the Secret Service. From the Olympic Committee headquarters in Colorado Springs, his office is able to monitor security images from other Olympic training sites in Lake Placid, New York, and Chula Vista, California, a suburb of San Diego. The grounds of the Olympic Committee is open to the public and has a visitor's center and gift shop. As Chief Security Officer, Buendorf is responsible for security of the U.S. Olympic Committee. However, he was not directly responsible for security at the Olympic Games when they were held in the United States in 1996 and 2002, as such tasks were performed by local, state, and federal government personnel, as well as contracted private security.
On September 5, 1975, President Gerald Ford, who had just given a speech at the California State Capitol in Sacramento, walked across a park where a crowd had gathered. A woman in a red dress, who later was identified as Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, was seen following Ford while he was shaking hands. Upon seeing a Colt M1911 pistol, Secret Service Special Agent Larry Buendorf stepped in front of Ford. Buendorf yelled "Gun!", alerting the other agents who evacuated Ford. He pulled the gun away and wrestled the woman to the ground, in the process slightly injuring his thumb and hand while placing the webbing of his thumb between the gun's cocked hammer and the slide of the pistol.
Ford faced two assassination attempts during his presidency. In Sacramento, California, on September 5, 1975, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, a follower of Charles Manson, pointed a Colt .45-caliber handgun at Ford. As Fromme pulled the trigger, Larry Buendorf, a Secret Service agent, grabbed the gun, and Fromme was taken into custody. She was later convicted of attempted assassination of the President and was sentenced to life in prison; she was paroled on August 14, 2009.
Ford faced two assassination attempts during his presidency. In Sacramento, California, on September 5, 1975, Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, a follower of Charles Manson, pointed a Colt .45-caliber handgun at Ford. As Fromme pulled the trigger, Larry Buendorf, a Secret Service agent, grabbed the gun, and Fromme was taken into custody. She was later convicted of attempted assassination of the President and was sentenced to life in prison; she was paroled on August 14, 2009.
On the morning of September 5, 1975, Fromme went to Sacramento's Capitol Park (reportedly to plead with President Gerald Ford about the plight of the California redwoods) dressed in a red robe and armed with a Colt M1911 .45 semi-automatic pistol that she pointed at Ford. The pistol's magazine was loaded with four rounds, but there was no cartridge in the chamber. She was immediately restrained by Larry Buendorf, a Secret Service agent. While being further restrained and handcuffed, Fromme managed to say a few sentences to the on-scene cameras, emphasizing that the gun "didn't go off". The photograph of her 1975 arrest, showing Fromme sitting in a Sacramento City Police vehicle as she waited to be brought to jail, remains in frequent usage. In 1980, Fromme told "The Sacramento Bee" that she had deliberately ejected the cartridge in her weapon's chamber before leaving home that morning.
While Fromme pointed the gun at Ford, several people heard a "metallic click" sound. As the red-robed Fromme shouted, "It wouldn't go off", Secret Service agent Larry Buendorf grabbed the gun, forced it from Fromme's hand, and brought her to the ground. On the ground, Fromme said, "It didn't go off. Can you believe it? It didn't go off." One of the Secret Service agents shouted "get down, let's go." Secret Service agents then half-dragged Ford away from Fromme towards the east entrance of the Capitol, until Ford yelled in protest, "Put me down! Put me down!" Ford continued his walk to the California state house, entered, and then met with California governor Jerry Brown at 10:06 a.m. for 30 minutes without mentioning the assassination attempt until they were through talking business. Ford, who later indicated that he was not scared, concluded, "I thought I'd better get on with my day's schedule."
Guadalajara, due to the ongoing Mexican Drug War, has seen escalating violence. Some countries, including the United States and Canada, expressed concerns about the safety and security of the region. Scott Backmun of the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) raised concerns about the city's ability to host the games in light of the drug war. Due to the increased safety issues the USOC had its own security plan for the games. During a meeting of the USOC in March 2011, chief security officer Larry Buendorf gave a report to the rest of the committee in which he said, "We’re going to prepare for Guadalajara like we would any other Games. A lot of that is just preparing your athletes for the individual environments that they’re going into. Everybody is quite aware of the violence that has happened. We’re obviously concerned about it, and at the end of the day, I think we have a good security plan in place to try to protect our athletes". After grenades were thrown near a nightclub entrance in two separate incidents in February 2011, organizers said they were making security a priority and arranged for police and members of the armed forces to patrol in Guadalajara throughout the games.