Synonyms for buonaccorsi or Related words with buonaccorsi

carletti              bozzolo              pilati              barlassina              gualandi              fardella              giovannelli              supino              padovano              angiolo              casetti              accoramboni              tadini              mazzanti              gaetani              rapetti              alliata              pecori              piovene              gallinaro              raffaelli              carmignani              querini              bottoni              trevisani              taparelli              gianbattista              scopelliti              paleari              ghisi              massaia              gerosa              sestini              fillipo              vignolo              gardini              comparetti              soranzo              gasperoni              freschi              besozzi              raniero              altomonte              onofri              vignoli              aldini              piacentino              castracane              calcagnini              cremonesi             



Examples of "buonaccorsi"
The "Palazzo Buonaccorsi" was built in 1700–1720 for Count Raimondo Buonaccorsi and his son Cardinal Simone Buonaccorsi using designs by Giovanni Battista Contini. The piano nobile is known for the "Sala dell'Eneide", decorated with frescoes by Rambaldi, Dardani, Solimena, and canvases by Garzi and Giovanni Gioseffo dal Sole.
The Palazzo Buonaccorsi is a palace in Macerata, Marche, Italy. It was built in 1700-1720 for Count Raimondo Buonaccorsi and his son, Cardinal Simone Buonaccorsi, using designs by Giovanni Battista Contini. The palace is notable for its series of rococo paintings on themes from the Aeneid, painted by a number of prominent Italian artists.
Villani and the Buonaccorsi had gained an unsavory reputation as early as 1331, when Villani was tried (and cleared) for barratry for his part in building the new third circuit of walls around Florence. Charles, Duke of Calabria had granted the Buonaccorsi the right to tax three of the six districts of Florence, which did not help Villani's reputation amongst his fellow citizens. In early June 1342, partners and agents of the Buonaccorsi suddenly fled Florence, Avignon, and Naples, following bankruptcy proceedings by creditors, nearly all of whom had deposits in the Buonaccorsi bank. Like other Florentine bankers and companies having difficulty with bankruptcy at the time, in September 1342 they supported the move to invite Walter VI of Brienne to become the next "signor" of Florence. Walter later suspended all legal actions taken against the Buonaccorsi and other company partners for nearly a year.
In his writings Buonaccorsi argued for the strengthening of the king's power at the expense of the aristocracy. In Kraków he joined Conrad Celtis' Sodalitas Vistuliana.
Filippo Buonaccorsi, called "Callimachus" (Latin: "Philippus Callimachus Experiens", "Bonacursius"; ; 2 May 1437 – 1 November 1496) was an Italian humanist and writer.
Claims have also been put forth that de Valette had at least another daughter, Isabella Guasconi, after a presumed affair with the wife of a Rhodiot nobleman of Florentine descent. Isabella later married a Florentine gentleman Stefano Buonaccorsi, but he murdered her on 31 July 1568, some time after their marriage. After the murder Buonaccorsi escaped the islands with Isabella's wealth and was never heard from again.
In the past five years, The Flood Fine Arts Center has hosted other internationally acclaimed artists including Jim Buonaccorsi, Nava Lubelski, Mike Estabrook, Cory Bradley, Mike Calway-Fagen, Allen Leper Hampton, Porge Buck, Heinz Kossler, and James Esber.
Giuseppe Gambarini (1680 – 11 September 1725) was an Italian painter of the late-Baroque period, active mainly in Bologna. He was a pupil of the painters Lorenzo Pasinelli and Cesare Gennari. He also painted frescoes in the Palazzo Buonaccorsi in Macerata. He is also called "Gioseffo Gambarini". One of his pupils was Stefano Gherardini
Buonaccorsi later became tutor to the sons of Polish King Casimir IV Jagiellon and took part in diplomatic missions. In 1474 he was named royal secretary, in 1476 he served as ambassador to Constantinople, and in 1486 he became the King's representative in Venice. With the accession to the Polish throne of Buonaccorsi's former pupil as John I of Poland, his influence peaked.
Filippo Buonaccorsi was born in San Gimignano, in Tuscany, in north-central Italy. He first appeared in Venice and Rome, where he was secretary to Bishop Bartolomeo Roverella. He moved to Rome in 1462 and became a member of the Rome Academy of Julius Pomponius Laetus.
He was one of the painters who contributed a canvas depicting the mythologic scene of "Andromache weeping before Aeneas" for the renowned "Aenid Gallery" of the Palazzo Buonaccorsi in Macerata; a decoration that employed many of the premier contemporary artists: with frescoes by Rambaldi, Dardani, and Solimena; and canvases by Garzi, Gambarini, Balestra, Lazzarini, and Franceschini.
Giovanni Villani was born into the Florentine merchant middle class. He was the son of Villano di Stoldi di Bellincione, who came from an old and well-respected "arti maggiori" family of merchants. Villani was a member of the "Arte di Calimala" (wool finishers) guild in Florence since 1300, serving on the "mercanzia" council of eight. During that year he visited Rome during the jubilee celebration. After observing the well-known ancient monuments of Rome and acknowledging its renowned historical personages, he was inspired to write the "Cronica", a universal history of Florence in a strictly linear, year-by-year format. During the early years of the 14th century, he gained political perspective by travelling throughout Italy, Switzerland, France and Flanders for the Peruzzi bank, of which he was a shareholder from 1300 to 1308. Traveling abroad as a factor for the company, Villani was paid a regular salary in addition to his shareholding profits. On May 15, 1306, one of the first exchange contracts ("cambium") to mention the city of Bruges involved two parties: Giovanni Villani, representing the Peruzzi Company, granting a loan to Tommaso Fini, representing the Gallerani Company of Siena. Villani and his brother Matteo transferred most of their economic activities to the Buonaccorsi firm by 1322. Giovanni Villani was a co-director of Buonaccorsi in 1324. The Buonaccorsi handled banking and commodity trade activities, spreading their influence throughout Italy, France, Flanders, England and several places in the Mediterranean.
They soon sold it to the Buonaccorsi banking family. In the general crash of Florentine banks in 1345 (bad debts by King Edward III of England for his Battle of Crécy and Battle of Poitiers (1356) campaigns) it was purchased by Niccolo, son of Ugo degli Albizi, a wealthy mercantile family. A branch of this family, for reasons of political expediency renamed Alessandri, occupied the castle for some three hundred years.
The most credited hagiography of Saint Fina is Fra’ Giovanni del Coppo (“Historia vita et morte di Sancta Fina da San Gimignano”, written on 14th century and translated from Latin by Jacopo Manducci in 1575), who lived closest in time to Saint Fina. Many others have tried to tell Saint Fina’s life (Enrico Castaldi, Giovanni Bollando, Filippo Buonaccorsi, Teodoro Ferroni, Ignazio Malenotti, Luigi Pecori, Ugo Nomi Veronesi Pesciolini, and Enrico Fiumi).
The classification of the Atlantic blue marlin ("M. nigricans") and the Indo-Pacific blue marlin ("M. mazara") as separate species is under debate. Genetic data suggest, although the two groups are isolated from each other, they are both the same species, with the only genetic exchange occurring when Indo-Pacific blue marlin migrate to and contribute genes to the Atlantic population. A separate study by V. P. Buonaccorsi, J. R. Mcdowell, and Graves indicated that both Indo-Pacific and Atlantic show "striking phylogeographic partitioning" of mitochondrial and microsatellite loci.
With the advent of the Renaissance, the Polish language was finally accepted on an equal footing with Latin. Polish culture and art flourished under Jagiellonian rule, and many foreign poets and writers settled in Poland, bringing with them new literary trends. Such writers included Kallimach (Filippo Buonaccorsi) and Conrad Celtis. Many Polish writers studied abroad, and at the Kraków Academy, which became a melting pot for new ideas and currents. In 1488 the world's first writers' club, called "Sodalitas Litterarum Vistulana" was founded in Kraków. Notable members included Conrad Celtes, Albert Brudzewski, Filip Callimachus and Laurentius Corvinus.
Born in Florence, Villani was the brother of the historian Giovanni. He worked for a company called Buonaccorsi, of which he was the representative in Naples. After the death of his brother, he continued his work writing eleven books of the "Nuova Cronica". Critics praised his commitment to seek sources and to read up on the facts; of particular importance it was the part related to the plague of 1348, which emerges between the clichés of the genre, an existential reflection on life. He died in a plague epidemic, in 1363. His work was briefly continued by his son Filippo.
With the advent of the Renaissance, the Polish language was finally accepted on an equal footing with Latin. Polish culture and art flourished under Jagiellonian rule, and many foreign poets and writers settled in Poland, bringing with them new literary trends. Such writers included Kallimach (Filippo Buonaccorsi) and Conrad Celtis. Many Polish writers studied abroad, and at the Kraków Academy, which became a melting pot for new ideas and currents. In 1488 the world's first writers' club, called "Sodalitas Litterarum Vistulana" was founded in Kraków. Notable members included Conrad Celtes, Albert Brudzewski, Filip Callimachus and Laurentius Corvinus.
Laetus was born at Teggiano, near Salerno, the illegitimate scion of the princely house of Sanseverino, the German historian Ludwig von Pastor reported. He studied at Rome under Lorenzo Valla, whom he succeeded in 1457 as professor of eloquence in the Gymnasium Romanum. About this time he founded an academy ("Accademia Romana"), the members of which adopted Greek and Latin names, and met at the house of Laetus on the Quirinal, which was filled with fragments and inscriptions and Roman coins collected by this early antiquarian, to discuss classical questions; they celebrated the birthday of Romulus. Its constitution resembled that of an ancient priestly college, and Laetus was styled "pontifex maximus". Bartolomeo Platina and Filippo Buonaccorsi were among the most distinguished members of the circle, which also included Giovanni Sulpizio da Veroli, the editor of the first printed "De architectura" of Vitruvius and organizer of the first production of a Senecan tragedy mounted since Antiquity.
Although most Moldavian chronicles attribute the establishment of Moldavia to Dragoș, that tradition "is not in keeping with contemporary sources", according to Victor Spinei. For instance, one Voivode Peter, supported by the local Vlachs and Hungarians, expelled his brother, Stephen, and defeated a Polish army at Şipeniţ (now Shypyntsi in Ukraine) in 1359, according to Jan Długosz and Filippo Buonaccorsi, which shows the existence of a Vlach polity in the lands which were integrated into Moldavia by the end of the century. Dragoș accepted the suzerainty of Louis I of Hungary. However, numerous local Vlach groups were opposed to the rule of the king. For instance, Louis I granted Dragoș of Giulești (whom some historian identify with the first voivode of Moldavia) six villages along the river Mara in Maramureș on 20 March 1360, because Giulești had "turned, with wakeful care and tireless endeavour, back to the path of unswerving many rebellious Romanians" in Moldavia.