Synonyms for chalepas or Related words with chalepas

yannoulis              doxaras              nikiphoros              gerasimos              nikitas              tsarouchis              vasileiou              frangiskos              prodromos              bonanos              symeonidis              matthaios              sochos              kossos              grigorios              roufos              lytras              epameinondas              engonopoulos              lassanis              pahatouridis              nicolaos              gazis              diamantis              anthimos              lykourgos              gysis              hagios              theofilos              jakobides              giorgios              haralambos              apostolis              valerios              charalambos              aimilios              kontoglou              manthos              vasileios              matesis              kritikos              farmakidis              chortatzis              peristeris              aristidis              theotokis              panagis              thanassis              baltatzis              ghikas             



Examples of "chalepas"
Yannoulis Chalepas (, August 14, 1851 – September 15, 1938) was a Greek sculptor and significant figure of Modern Greek art.
In 1878, Chalepas suffered a nervous breakdown. He began destroying some of his sculptures and made several suicide attempts. His condition worsened and from July 11, 1888 to June 6, 1902, he was committed to the Mental Hospital of Corfu. In 1901 his father died and the next year his mother went to Corfu and took Chalepas to Tinos. After his return, Chalepas lived under his mother's strict supervision, who blamed sculpture for her son's illness and prevented him from sculpting, destroying everything he created.
So far, the museum has hosted two temporary exhibitions. The exhibition "Marino Marini (1901-1980)" (June–October 2006) and a retrospective exhibition of Yannoulis Chalepas (February–September 2007).
Other artists associated with the School of Munich were Symeon Sabbides, Yannoulis Chalepas, Leonidas Drosis, as well as quite a few modernist artists who studied in Munich, which included Theofrastos Triantafyllidis, Jorgos Busianis, and also Giorgio de Chirico.
Notable sculptors of the new Greek Kingdom were Leonidas Drosis (his major work was the extensive neo-classical architectural ornament at the Academy of Athens), Lazaros Sochos, Georgios Vitalis, Dimitrios Filippotis, Ioannis Kossos, Yannoulis Chalepas, Georgios Bonanos and Lazaros Fytalis.
Notable sculptors of the new Greek Kingdom were Leonidas Drosis whose major work was the extensive neo-classical architectural ornament at the Academy of Athens, Lazaros Sochos, Georgios Vitalis, Dimitrios Filippotis, Ioannis Kossos, Yannoulis Chalepas, Georgios Bonanos and Lazaros Fytalis.
Notable sculptors of the new state were Leonidas Drosis (his major work was the extensive neo-classical architectural ornament at the Academy of Athens, Lazaros Sochos, Georgios Vitalis, Dimitrios Filippotis, Ioannis Kossos, Yannoulis Chalepas, Georgios Bonanos and Lazaros Fytalis.
Works by Liana Anastasiadis, Lydia Andrioti, Panagiota Apostolopoulos, Leonidas Chalepas, Mark Hadjipateras, Marie Jacotey, Anita King, Esther Lemi, Christos Markogiannakis, Maria Nymfiadi, Costas Picadas, Fotis Sagonas, Cam Santin, Katerina Skassi, Alice Skoulikidis, Lydia Venieri, Iria Vrettos, Tassos Vrettos, Cindy Tower.
His mother died in 1916 and Chalepas began to work again with insufficient means, after a long time of inactivity. He gained attention and made contacts with intellectual circles in Athens. Also, many eminent personalities of the arts, such as Thomas Thomopoulos, member of the Academy of Athens, and Zacharias Papantoniou, director of the National Gallery of Athens, visited him in Tinos. In 1925, an exhibition of Chalepas' works was organized by the Academy of Athens, and in 1927 he received the Academy's “Award for Excellence in Arts and Letters”. In 1930 he moved to Athens and continued working until his death on September 15, 1938.
Other notable painters of the era are Theodore Ralli, Ioannis Altamouras and the folk painter Theofilos Hatzimichail. Notable sculptors of the era are Leonidas Drosis (his major work was the extensive neo-classical architectural ornament at the Academy of Athens, Lazaros Sochos, Georgios Vitalis, Dimitrios Filippotis, Ioannis Kossos, Yannoulis Chalepas, Georgios Bonanos and Lazaros Fytalis.
The first artistic movement in the Greek Kingdom can be considered the Greek academic art of the 19th century ("Munich School"). Notable modern Greek painters include Nikolaos Gyzis, Georgios Jakobides, Theodoros Vryzakis, Nikiforos Lytras, Konstantinos Volanakis, Nikos Engonopoulos and Yannis Tsarouchis, while some notable sculptors are Pavlos Prosalentis, Ioannis Kossos, Leonidas Drosis, Georgios Bonanos, Georgios Fytalis and Yannoulis Chalepas.
Tinos is famous amongst Greeks for the Church of Panagia Evangelistria, its 80 or so windmills, about 1000 artistic dovecotes, 50 active villages and its Venetian fortifications at the mountain, Exomvourgo. On Tinos, both Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholic populations co-exist, and the island is also well known for its famous sculptors and painters, such as Nikolaos Gysis, Yannoulis Chalepas and Nikiforos Lytras.
The collected artists included Adam Chodzko, Bernhard Cella, Amy O’Neill, Jim Shaw, Jimmie Durham, Andisheh Avini, Yuken Teruya, Antonis Kiriakoulis, Deanna Maganias, Giannoulis Chalepas, Elena Poka, Ilias Kafouros, Kostis Velonis, Dimitris Papaioannou, Mantalina Psoma, Emmanouil Zacharioudakis, Simon Periton, Marie Francoise Poutays, Mary Redmont, Michael Michaeledes, Minas, Spyros Litinas, Stephen Dean, Vasso Gavaisse, Lydia Venieri,Vangelis Vlahos and Yorgos Papountzis.
In the cemetery there are three churches. The main is the Church of Saint Theodores and there is also a smaller of Saint Lazarus. The third church is a Catholic church. The cemetery includes the tomb of Heinrich Schliemann, designed by Ernst Ziller, the tomb of Ioannis Pesmazoglou, that of Georgios Averoff, and one named "I Koimomeni" (the Sleeping Girl), by the sculptor Yannoulis Chalepas, from the island Tinos. There are also separate burial places for Protestants and Jews.
In Dragatsani’s cemetery in Romania there is the Monument of the Deceased Sacred Band’s members which was erected in 1884, an initiative by the editing committee of the Greek newspaper “Syllogoi” in Bucharest. The memorial was crafted in Pentelic marble by Chalepas and Lampaditis. It is 7 meters in height. On the front side of the pillar rises a 5-meter monolith with embossed cross on the crescent and under this the symbol of the Sacred Band’s members. At the center of the pillar there is the inscription: “"ΔΙΑΒΑΤΑ ΑΓΓΕΛΟΥ ΟΤΙ ΕΝΘΑΔΕ ΚΕΙΜΕΘΑ ΥΠΕΡ ΕΛΕΥΘΕΡΙΑΣ ΑΓΩΝΙΣΑΜΕΝΟΙ"” .
The creative production of Chalepas is shared between two periods, the first, from the early years to the start of his mental illness, and the second, called the "post-sanity" period (1918–1938) which is divided into two phases. The first corresponds to the years of rehabilitation in Tinos, from 1918 to 1930, and the second spans the last years of his life, from 1930 to his death in 1938. Chalepas's early work shows the rare maturity of the artist from the very beginning.
Chalepas was born in Pyrgos, on the island of Tinos in 1851, from a family of marble hewers. From 1869 to 1872, he studied at the School of Arts in Athens, under Neoclassical sculptor Leonidas Drossis. In 1873, he left for Munich, under a scholarship of the Panhellenic Holy Foundation of the Evangelistria of Tinos, to continue his studies at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts under the Neoclassical sculptor Max von Widnmann. His scholarship was intercepted to be given to another student. He returned to Athens in 1876, opened a workshop and began working individually.
Notable modern Greek artists include Renaissance painter Dominikos Theotokopoulos (El Greco), Panagiotis Doxaras, Nikolaos Gyzis, Nikiphoros Lytras, Yannis Tsarouchis, Nikos Engonopoulos, Constantine Andreou, Jannis Kounellis, sculptors such as Leonidas Drosis, Georgios Bonanos, Yannoulis Chalepas and Joannis Avramidis, conductor Dimitri Mitropoulos, soprano Maria Callas, composers such as Mikis Theodorakis, Nikos Skalkottas, Iannis Xenakis, Manos Hatzidakis, Eleni Karaindrou, Yanni and Vangelis, one of the best-selling singers worldwide Nana Mouskouri and poets such as Kostis Palamas, Dionysios Solomos, Angelos Sikelianos and Yannis Ritsos. Alexandrian Constantine P. Cavafy and Nobel laureates Giorgos Seferis and Odysseas Elytis are among the most important poets of the 20th century. Novel is also represented by Alexandros Papadiamantis and Nikos Kazantzakis.
Near Chora there is the Pera Castle or Castle of Chrisocheria. Built by Knights Hospitaller, it is one of the most famous sights of the island. Pothia has got two museums. The first is the Archaeological Museum of Kalymnos with collections from archaeological sites of the island and the second is the naval museum related with the sponge fishing and the naval tradition of the island. Other places of interest in the island are the Cathedral of the Transfiguration of Jesus Christ. The temple, built in the 19th century, has got magnificent marble sculpture by the notable Greek sculptor Giannoulis Chalepas.
The museum’s collection consists of representative paintings, sculptures, and engravings by noted artists of the twentieth century. More specifically, it includes: paintings by Rengos, Plakotaris, Mavridis, Kaniaris, Tetsis, Kokkinidis, Mytaras, Kondos, Kanakakis, Kondogiannis, Tsaras, Xanthopoulos, Botsoglou, Dimitreas, Sahinis, Fokas, Golfinos, Lachas, Kalamaras, Papagiannis, Georgiadis, Zongolopoulos, Perandinos, Koulandianos, Lappas; sculptures by Chalepas; engravings by Hadzikyriakos-Gikas, Rengos, Papageorgiou, Grammatikopoulos, Papadakis, Xenakis, Nikolaou, Sikeliotis, Tsoklis, Moralis, Giannadakis, Nedelkos. A recent addition to the exhibits is a collection entitled ‘Tribute to El Greco’, which was put together from donations from Greek artists to acquire El Greco’s ‘St Peter’ from the National Gallery and 44 engravings by 31 foreign artists from Florence. The collection was displayed in the museum in August, 1999.