Synonyms for chamaesyce or Related words with chamaesyce

floribundum              cercidium              ramosissima              microphyllum              multifida              uniflora              sessiliflora              chaerophyllum              corymbosa              symphoricarpos              stricta              gnaphalium              celastroides              linifolia              uliginosa              diversifolia              micrantha              glabrescens              laurifolius              randia              breviflora              oplismenus              oblongifolia              speciosum              jacquemontia              herbacea              latifolium              auriculata              paniculatum              squarrosa              ichnanthus              parvifolium              bracteata              peduncularis              marsdenia              heliotropium              wedelia              tenuifolium              longiflora              tylophora              oppositifolia              lanceolatum              microlepia              cernua              densiflorum              porophyllum              kickxia              pulmonaria              rugosum              mollugo             



Examples of "chamaesyce"
· Ka‘ena ‘akoko ("Chamaesyce celastroides" var. "kaenana")
Chamaesyce is a former genus of plants, all of which have now been reclassified as species of "Euphorbia". Taxonomically speaking therefore, "Chamaesyce" has only synonym status at present. It was a large genus, with more than 500 species.
The larvae feed on various Euphorbiaceae species, including "Chamaesyce hyssopifolia". Full-grown larvae reach a length of about 30 mm.
Five species recognised as "threatened" by the New South Wales Government occur within the park – these are "Allocasuarina defungens", "A. simulans", "Chamaesyce psammogeton", "Cynanchum elegans" and "Senna acclinis".
The list includes the former (and never generally accepted) genus "Chamaesyce", as well as the related genera "Elaeophorbia", "Endadenium", "Monadenium", "Synadenium" and "Pedilanthus" which according to recent DNA sequence-based phylogenetic studies are all nested within "Euphorbia"
The list includes the former (and never generally accepted) genus "Chamaesyce", as well as the related genera "Elaeophorbia", "Endadenium", "Monadenium", "Synadenium" and "Pedilanthus" which according to recent DNA sequence-based phylogenetic studies are all nested within "Euphorbia"
Euphorbia celastroides, previously also known as Chamaesyce celastroides, named akoko by the Hawaiians, is a species of spurge closely related to the poinsettia. This species develops into a round-shape shrub. This species is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands.
The list includes the former (and never generally accepted) genus "Chamaesyce", as well as the related genera "Elaeophorbia", "Endadenium", "Monadenium", "Synadenium" and "Pedilanthus" which according to recent DNA sequence-based phylogenetic studies are all nested within "Euphorbia"
The list includes the former (and never generally accepted) genus "Chamaesyce", as well as the related genera "Elaeophorbia", "Endadenium", "Monadenium", "Synadenium" and "Pedilanthus" which according to recent DNA sequence-based phylogenetic studies are all nested within "Euphorbia"
Originally, species in the genus "Chamaesyce" had varied strikingly from each other, differing in superficial appearance and ecology, but the genus had been established on the basis of morphological characteristics of the inflorescences and associated structures. Since then however, genetic analysis has indicated that species that had been assigned to "Chamaesyce" are less closely related to each other than to other species of "Euphorbia"; the morphological aspects that had suggested that they belonged together in their own genus were the consequences of convergent evolution of these superficially similar structures.
Euphorbia kuwaleana (syn. "Chamaesyce kuwaleana") is a rare species of flowering plant in the euphorb family known by the common name kokomalei. It is endemic to Oahu, Hawaii, where it is known only from a four-kilometer stretch of the Waianae Range. Like other Hawaiian euphorbs, this plant is known locally as `akoko. It is a federally listed endangered species of the United States.
This plant occurs on north-facing cliffs above the beaches of the Nā Pali coast on Kauai. It grows low enough to be regularly misted by sea spray. Other plants in the habitat include naio ("Myoporum sandwicense"), kawelu ("Eragrostis variabilis"), ohelo kai ("Lycium sandwicense"), pili ("Heteropogon contortus"), ahinahina ("Artemisia australis"), and akoko ("Chamaesyce celastroides").
Traditional medicine is also used for childbirth and infertility. One study, which conducted interviews with Trinidadians over a four-year period from 1996-2000, found the use of the following plants for childbirth and infertility: "Mimosa pudica", "Ruta graveolens", "Abelmoschus moschatus", "Chamaesyce hirta", "Cola nitida", "Ambrosia cumanenesis", "Pilea microphylla", "Eryngium foetidum", "Aristolochia rugosa", "Aristolochia trilobata", "Coleus aromaticus", "Laportea aestuans" and "Vetiveria zizanioides".
Euphorbia deppeana (syn. "Chamaesyce deppeana") is a rare species of flowering plant in the euphorb family known by the common names Deppe's broomspurge and Oahu sandmat. It is endemic to Oahu, Hawaii, where it is known from only one population in moist shrublands on Nuuanu Pali. Like other native Hawaiian euphorbs it is called akoko locally.
According to a 2002 publication on studies of DNA sequence data, most of the smaller "satellite genera" around the huge genus "Euphorbia" nest deep within the latter. Consequently, these taxa, namely the never generally accepted genus "Chamaesyce", as well as the smaller genera "Cubanthus", "Elaeophorbia", "Endadenium", "Monadenium", "Synadenium",
Euphorbia skottsbergii (syn. "Chamaesyce skottsbergii") is a rare species of flowering plant in the euphorb family known by the common names coastal sandmat and Skottsberg's broomspurge. It is endemic to Hawaii, where it is found in coastal shrublands on Oahu, Molokai, Maui, and Kahoolawe. Like other Hawaiian euphorbs, this plant is known locally as akoko.
Euphorbia rockii (syn. "Chamaesyce rockii") is a rare species of flowering plant in the euphorb family known by the common names Koolau Range sandmat and Rock's broomspurge. It is endemic to Oahu, Hawaii, where it is known only from the Koolau Mountains. There are 200 to 300 plants remaining. Like other Hawaiian euphorbs, this plant is known locally as akoko.
Euphorbia chamaesyce called prostrate spurge(in Persian خاماسوقی، تین الارض، انجیر زمینی), is an annual plant in the family Euphorbiaceae. It is native to southern North America, and has been introduced and established in other areas of North America and other countries worldwide.
Euphorbia albomarginata (formerly Chamaesyce albomarginata), whitemargin sandmat or rattlesnake weed, is a small low-growing annual, in the spurge family (Euphorbia, Euphorbiaceae) native to desert, chaparral, and grassland habitats of southwestern North America, from southern and central California to Northern Mexico and Louisiana.
The former genus name "Chamaesyce" comes from the Greek word "chame", meaning "on the ground", and "syce" meaning "fig". This refers to the growth pattern of being flattened in all aspects, as if a box had been placed on it, so as to be lying very close to the ground. One of the defining chaparral plants, Chamise ("Adenostoma fasciculatum"), derives from the same word.