Synonyms for chryssa or Related words with chryssa

caniaris              hadjikyriakos              chalepas              engonopoulos              ghikas              tsarouchis              aimilios              stavrakakis              fassianos              vrettakos              sinopoulos              vogiatzis              makridis              spiropoulos              karamitsos              nassos              myrat              andreou              diakoulas              loizos              alkis              economopoulos              chiparus              vlavianos              axiotis              leonardos              yannoulis              fokas              gounaropoulos              michalakis              arvanitis              protopappas              triantafyllidis              doxaras              triantafillidis              panagopoulos              koulis              fotiades              stamatios              nikitas              kalogeropoulos              brougos              mytaras              stavrou              benakis              anastassopoulos              papadopulos              lavrentis              georgalis              mavrogenis             



Examples of "chryssa"
Although Chryssa has always used the mononym professionally, some fine arts and art auction references nevertheless cite her as Chryssa Vardea, Vardea Chryssa, Chryssa Varda, or Varda Chryssa.
Chryssa presents her paintings at the Mihalarias Art Center.
Partial listings of exhibitions and institutions with works by Chryssa in permanent collections:
Chryssa Kouveliotou is a Greek astrophysicist who studied in the United Kingdom and Germany.
The Whitney Museum of American Art mounted a solo exhibition of works by Chryssa.
"Chryssa 60/90" retrospective exhibition in Athens in the Mihalarias Art Center.
Then at the age of 79, Chryssa died of heart-related problems, in Athens, Greece, on December 23, 2013.
Other works by Chryssa in composite honeycomb aluminum and neon in the 1980s and 1990s include "Chinatown", "Siren", "Urban Traffic", and "Flapping Birds".
Chryssa Vardea-Mavromichali (; December 31, 1933 – December 23, 2013) was a Greek American artist who worked in a wide variety of media. An American art pioneer in light art and luminist sculpture widely known for her neon, steel, aluminum and acrylic glass installations, she has always used the mononym Chryssa professionally. She worked from the mid-1950s in New York City studios and worked since 1992 in the studio she established in Neos Kosmos, Athens, Greece.
Varda was married three times: to Dorothy Varda during the 1920s; to Virginia Barclay Varda from 1940 until approximately 1947; and to Chryssa Vardea Mavromichali, from 1955 until 1958. He is survived by a granddaughter, Joui Turandot.
The museum houses more than 300 paintings by Greek artists such as Takis, Chryssa, Fassianos, Kounellis, Psychopedis and Tetsis, and international artists such as Auguste Rodin, Paul Delvaux and others.
Chryssa was born in Athens into the famous Mavromichalis family from the Deep Mani. Her family, while not rich, was educated and cultured; one of her sisters, who studied medicine, was a friend of the poet and novelist Nikos Kazantzakis.
Chryssa, a Greek artist, is largely credited with establishing neon as a visual art form. She was very active in the 1960s and 70s and created large-scale works with a focus on and constant incorporation of neon. Other artists began exploring the neon technology in 1970s, and have continued to do so in contemporary art making.
Also during the 1960s and 1970s artists as diverse as Eduardo Paolozzi, Chryssa, Claes Oldenburg, George Segal, Edward Kienholz, Nam June Paik, Wolf Vostell, Duane Hanson, and John DeAndrea explored abstraction, imagery and figuration through video art, environment, light sculpture, and installation art in new ways.
Chryssa began painting during her teenage years and also studied to be a social worker. In 1953, on the advice of "a leading art critic in Greece," her family sent her to Paris to study at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière where André Breton, Edgard Varèse, and Max Ernst were among her associates and Alberto Giacometti was a visiting professor.
In 1954, at age twenty-one, Chryssa sailed for the United States, arrived in New York, and went to San Francisco, California to study at the California School of Fine Arts. Returning to New York in 1955, she became a United States citizen and established a studio in the city.
Also during the 1960s and 1970s artists as diverse as Eduardo Paolozzi, Chryssa, Walter De Maria, Claes Oldenburg, George Segal, Edward Kienholz, Nam June Paik, Wolf Vostell, Duane Hanson, and John DeAndrea explored abstraction, imagery, and figuration through video art, environment, light sculpture, and installation art in new ways.
"Arrow: Homage to Times Square" is a large 8 ft by work in painted cast aluminum. In a 2005 interview in Vouliagmeni, Chryssa said of this work: "I only ever kept one work for more than 15 years in my studio, "The Arrow" – it is now in Albany, in the Rockefeller Collection."
Also during the 1960s and 1970s artists as diverse as Stephen Antonakis, Chryssa, Walter De Maria, Dan Flavin, Robert Smithson, Robert Irwin, Claes Oldenburg, George Segal, Edward Kienholz, Duane Hanson, and John DeAndrea explored abstraction, imagery and figuration through Light sculpture, Land art, and installation art in new ways.
Among the most important acquisitions are works by Ilya Kabakov, Stephen Antonakos, Gary Hill, Nan Goldin, Vadim Zakharov, Gillian Wearing, Ann Sofi Siden, Vlassis Caniaris, Nikos Kessanlis, Dimitris Alithinos, Nikos Navridis, Joel Sanders, Allan Sekula, Costas Tsoclis, George Hadjimichalis, Chryssa, Yiannis Psychopedis, Andreas Angelidakis, Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis and Tessera.