Synonyms for chukim or Related words with chukim

mishpatim              neminem              chukotai              hilkhot              yishmael              makkot              keritot              bekhorot              sheviit              meilah              beitzah              hilchoth              hilkot              nomism              maasrot              arakhin              massekhet              sociis              middoth              salicae              sponsio              excusat              bashyazi              shevuot              benignitas              hamusar              textualism              horayot              temurah              eripuit              herem              tovarystva              menachot              chullin              praedae              pactus              ignorantia              demai              judicia              bezah              fluvii              halachot              hamashiach              halachah              negaim              hatzibur              amafinius              reddendo              logou              eruvin             



Examples of "chukim"
The 613 mitzvot have been divided also into three general categories: mishpatim; edot; and chukim. Mishpatim ("laws") include commandments that are deemed to be self-evident, such as not to murder and not to steal. Edot ("testimonies") commemorate important events in Jewish history. For example, the Shabbat is said to testify to the story that Hashem created the world in six days and rested on the seventh day and declared it holy. Chukim ("decrees") are commandments with no known rationale, and are perceived as pure manifestations of the Divine will.
Reading "My ordinances (, "mishpatai") shall you do, and My statutes (, "chukotai") shall you keep," the Sifra distinguished "ordinances" (, "mishpatim") from "statutes" (, "chukim"). The term "ordinances" (, "mishpatim"), taught the Sifra, refers to rules that even had they not been written in the Torah, it would have been entirely logical to write them, like laws pertaining to theft, sexual immorality, idolatry, blasphemy and murder. The term "statutes" (, "chukim"), taught the Sifra, refers to those rules that the impulse to do evil (, "yetzer hara") and the nations of the world try to undermine, like eating pork (prohibited by and ), wearing wool-linen mixtures (, "shatnez", prohibited by and ), release from levirate marriage (, "chalitzah", mandated by ), purification of a person affected by skin disease (, "metzora", regulated in ), and the goat sent off into the wilderness (the "scapegoat," regulated in ). In regard to these, taught the Sifra, the Torah says simply that God legislated them and we have no right to raise doubts about them.
A further division is made between "chukim" ("decrees" – laws without obvious explanation, such as "shatnez", the law prohibiting wearing clothing made of mixtures of linen and wool), "mishpatim" ("judgments" – laws with obvious social implications) and "eduyot" ("testimonies" or "commemorations", such as the Shabbat and holidays). Through the ages, various rabbinical authorities have classified some of the 613 commandments in various other ways.
Similarly, reading "My ordinances (, "mishpatai") shall you do, and My statutes (, "chukotai") shall you keep," the Sifra distinguished "ordinances" (, "mishpatim") from "statutes" (, "chukim"). The term "ordinances" (, "mishpatim"), taught the Sifra, refers to rules that even had they not been written in the Torah, it would have been entirely logical to write them, like laws pertaining to theft, sexual immorality, idolatry, blasphemy and murder. The term "statutes" (, "chukim"), taught the Sifra, refers to those rules that the impulse to do evil (, "yetzer hara") and the nations of the world try to undermine, like eating pork (prohibited by and ), wearing wool-linen mixtures (, "shatnez", prohibited by and ), release from levirate marriage (, "chalitzah", mandated by ), purification of a person affected by skin disease (, "metzora", regulated in ), and the goat sent off into the wilderness (the scapegoat, regulated in ). In regard to these, taught the Sifra, the Torah says simply that God legislated them and we have no right to raise doubts about them.
Reading "My ordinances (, "mishpatai") shall you do, and My statutes (, "chukotai") shall you keep", the Sifra distinguished "ordinances" (, "mishpatim") from "statutes" (, "chukim"). The term "ordinances" (, "mishpatim"), taught the Sifra, refers to rules that even had they not been written in the Torah, it would have been entirely logical to write them, like laws pertaining to theft, sexual immorality, idolatry, blasphemy and murder. The term "statutes" (, "chukim"), taught the Sifra, refers to those rules that the impulse to do evil (, "yetzer hara") and the nations of the world try to undermine, like eating pork (prohibited by and ), wearing wool-linen mixtures (, "shatnez", prohibited by and ), release from levirate marriage (, "chalitzah", mandated by ), purification of a person affected by skin disease (, "metzora", regulated in ), and the goat sent off into the wilderness (the "scapegoat," regulated in ). In regard to these, taught the Sifra, the Torah says simply that God legislated them and we have no right to raise doubts about them.
Reading "My ordinances (, "mishpatai") shall you do, and My statutes (, "chukotai") shall you keep," the Sifra distinguished "ordinances" (, "mishpatim") from "statutes" (, "chukim"). The term "ordinances" (, "mishpatim"), taught the Sifra, refers to rules that even had they not been written in the Torah, it would have been entirely logical to write them, like laws pertaining to theft, sexual immorality, idolatry, blasphemy and murder. The term "statutes" (, "chukim"), taught the Sifra, refers to those rules that the impulse to do evil (, "yetzer hara") and the nations of the world try to undermine, like eating pork (prohibited by and ), wearing wool-linen mixtures (, "shatnez", prohibited by and ), release from levirate marriage (, "chalitzah", mandated by ), purification of a person affected by skin disease (, "metzora", regulated in ), and the goat sent off into the wilderness (the "scapegoat," regulated in ). In regard to these, taught the Sifra, the Torah says simply that God legislated them and we have no right to raise doubts about them.
Reading "My ordinances (, "mishpatai") shall you do, and My statutes (, "chukotai") shall you keep," the Sifra distinguished "ordinances" (, "mishpatim") from "statutes" (, "chukim"). The term "ordinances" (, "mishpatim"), taught the Sifra, refers to rules that even had they not been written in the Torah, it would have been entirely logical to write them, like laws pertaining to theft, sexual immorality, idolatry, blasphemy and murder. The term "statutes" (, "chukim"), taught the Sifra, refers to those rules that the impulse to do evil (, "yetzer hara") and the nations of the world try to undermine, like eating pork (prohibited by and ), wearing wool-linen mixtures (, "shatnez", prohibited by and ), release from levirate marriage (, "chalitzah", mandated by ), purification of a person affected by skin disease (, "metzora", regulated in ), and the goat sent off into the wilderness (the scapegoat regulated in ). In regard to these, taught the Sifra, the Torah says simply that God legislated them and we have no right to raise doubts about them.
Jewish philosophy divides the 613 "mitzvot" into three groups—laws that have a rational explanation and would probably be enacted by most orderly societies ("mishpatim"), laws that are understood after being explained but would not be legislated without the Torah's command ("edot"), and laws that do not have a rational explanation ("chukim"). Some Jewish scholars say that "kashrut" should be categorized as laws for which there is no particular explanation, since the human mind is not always capable of understanding divine intentions. In this line of thinking, the dietary laws were given as a demonstration of God's authority, and man must obey without asking why. However, Maimonides believed that Jews were permitted to seek out reasons for the laws of the Torah.
Reading "My ordinances (, "mishpatai") shall you do, and My statutes (, "chukotai") shall you keep," the Rabbis in a Baraita taught that the "ordinances" (, "mishpatim") were commandments that logic would have dictated that we follow even had Scripture not commanded them, like the laws concerning idolatry, adultery, bloodshed, robbery, and blasphemy. And "statutes" (, "chukim") were commandments that the Adversary challenges us to violate as beyond reason, like those relating to wool-linen mixtures (, "shatnez", prohibited by and ), release from levirate marriage (, "chalitzah", mandated by ), purification of the person with "tzaraat" (in ), and the scapegoat (in ). So that people do not think these "ordinances" (, "mishpatim") to be empty acts, in God says, "I am the Lord," indicating that the Lord made these statutes, and we have no right to question them. The Sifra reported the same discussion, and added eating pork (prohibited by and ) and purification of a person affected by skin disease (, "metzora", regulated in ). Similarly, Rabbi Joshua of Siknin taught in the name of Rabbi Levi that the Evil Inclination criticizes four laws as without logical basis, and Scripture uses the expression "statute" ("chuk") in connection with each: the laws of (1) a brother's wife (in ), (2) mingled kinds (in and ), (3) the scapegoat (in ), and (4) the red cow (in ).
In Judaism, the only law concerning which fabrics may be interwoven together in clothing concerns the mixture of linen and wool, called "shaatnez"; it is restricted in "Thou shalt not wear a mingled stuff, wool and linen together" and , "'...neither shall there come upon thee a garment of two kinds of stuff mingled together.'" There is no explanation for this in the Torah itself and is categorized as a type of law known as "chukim", a statute beyond man's ability to comprehend. Josephus suggested that the reason for the prohibition was to keep the laity from wearing the official garb of the priests, while Maimonides thought that the reason was because heathen priests wore such mixed garments. Others explain that it is because God often forbids mixtures of disparate kinds, not designed by God to be compatible in a certain way, with mixing animal and vegetable fibers being similar to having two different types of plowing animals yoked together. And that such commands serve both a practical as well as allegorical purpose, perhaps here preventing a priestly garment that would cause discomfort (or excessive sweat) in a hot climate. Linen is also mentioned in the Bible in Proverbs 31, a passage describing a noble wife. says, "She makes coverings for her bed; she is clothed in fine linen and purple." Fine white linen is also worn by angels in the Bible.