Synonyms for cleroidea or Related words with cleroidea

cantharoidea              elateroidea              staphylinoidea              cucujoidea              chrysomeloidea              tenebrionoidea              meloidea              dascilloidea              scarabaeoidea              byrrhoidea              bostrichoidea              dryopoidea              hydrophiloidea              mordelloidea              staphylimidae              cerambycoidea              curculionoidea              cleridae              silphidae              cantharidae              hydrophilidae              oestridae              cixiidae              cicindelidae              tachimidae              caraboidea              lssidae              asterolecamidae              issidae              membracidae              coccinellidae              fulgoroidea              gyrinidae              filarioidea              phylloxeridae              blattidae              meloidae              adelgidae              flatidae              fulgoroidae              aphididae              trichostrongylidae              anguinidae              stratiomyidae              cicadellidae              trichogrammatidae              drosophilidae              faboideae              heteroderidae              asterolecaniidae             



Examples of "cleroidea"
Melyridae (common name: soft-wing flower beetles) are a family of beetles of the superfamily Cleroidea.
Cleroidea is a small superfamily of beetles. Most of the members of the group are somewhat slender, often with fairly soft, flexible elytra, and typically hairy or scaly.
Cleridae are a family of beetles of the superfamily Cleroidea. They are commonly known as checkered beetles. The family Cleridae has a worldwide distribution, and a variety of habitats and feeding preferences.
The infraorder Cucujiformia includes the vast majority of phytophagous (plant-eating) beetles, united by cryptonephric Malpighian tubules of the normal type, a cone ommatidium with open rhabdom, and lack of functional spiracles on the eighth abdominal segment. Constituent superfamilies of Cucujiformia are Cleroidea, Cucujoidea, Tenebrionoidea, Chrysomeloidea, and Curculionoidea. Evidently adoption of a phytophagous lifestyle correlates with taxon diversity in beetles, with Cucujiformia, especially weevils (Curculionoidea), forming a major radiation.
During the Cretaceous the diversity of Cupedidae and Archostemata decreased considerably. Predatory ground beetles (Carabidae) and rove beetles (Staphylinidae) began to distribute into different patterns: whereas the Carabidae predominantly occurred in the warm regions, the Staphylinidae and click beetles (Elateridae) preferred many areas with temperate climate. Likewise, predatory species of Cleroidea and Cucujoidea, hunted their prey under the bark of trees together with the jewel beetles (Buprestidae). The jewel beetles diversity increased rapidly during the Cretaceous, as they were the primary consumers of wood, while longhorn beetles (Cerambycidae) were rather rare and their diversity increased only towards the end of the Upper Cretaceous. The first coprophagous beetles have been recorded from the Upper Cretaceous, and are believed to have lived on the excrement of herbivorous dinosaurs, however there is still a discussion, whether the beetles were always tied to mammals during its development. Also, the first species with an adaption of both larvae and adults to the aquatic lifestyle are found. Whirligig beetles (Gyrinidae) were moderately diverse, although other early beetles (i.e., Dytiscidae) were less, with the most widespread being the species of Coptoclavidae, which preyed on aquatic fly larvae.
The Cretaceous saw the fragmenting of the southern landmass, with the opening of the southern Atlantic Ocean and the isolation of New Zealand, while South America, Antarctica, and Australia grew more distant. The diversity of Cupedidae and Archostemata decreased considerably. Predatory ground beetles (Carabidae) and rove beetles (Staphylinidae) began to distribute into different patterns; the Carabidae predominantly occurred in the warm regions, while the Staphylinidae and click beetles (Elateridae) preferred temperate climates. Likewise, predatory species of Cleroidea and Cucujoidea hunted their prey under the bark of trees together with the jewel beetles (Buprestidae). The diversity of jewel beetles increased rapidly, as they were the primary consumers of wood, while longhorn beetles (Cerambycidae) were rather rare: their diversity increased only towards the end of the Upper Cretaceous. The first coprophagous beetles are from the Upper Cretaceous and may have lived on the excrement of herbivorous dinosaurs. The first species where both larvae and adults are adapted to an aquatic lifestyle are found. Whirligig beetles (Gyrinidae) were moderately diverse, although other early beetles (e.g. Dytiscidae) were less, with the most widespread being the species of Coptoclavidae, which preyed on aquatic fly larvae.
Jules Bourgeois was initially associated with his father and brother in Rouen, as the Paris representative of the family weaving business(1881-1889) and he finally representing the spinning mills of H. Schwartz in Sainte Marie-aux-Mines from 1893. He used his leisure time to follow his true vocation, that of naturalist. An entomologist of international fame, J.B. studied especially the exotic coleoptera in the then group Malacodermata, now unranked (Elateroidea (in part), Lymexyloidea, Cleroidea, Tenebrionoidea). He described several hundreds of new species in many scientific publications and especially in the Bulletin and Annales of the Société entomologique de France of which he was a very active member. Jules Bourgeois is especially known to Alsatian entomologists by his catalogue of the beetles of "la chaîne des Vosges" and surrounding regions published in part in 1898 in the "Bulletin de la Société d’histoire naturelle de Colmar". One finds there more than 3000 species indexed with very many localities. The author thus showed the great richness of the entomological fauna of the Alsace,the richest of France, after the Provence and Côte d'Azur. With the death of Jules, the work, of 800 pages, was completed by Paul Scherdlin, conservator of the Musée zoologique de l'ULP et de la ville de Strasbourg, Strasbourg. In 1885, Jules Bourgeois had a rich collection of more than 15,000 species of Palearctic Coleoptera without counting all the exotic species. Because of the annexation of Alsace in 1870, this collection, like many others, was transferred to Paris. It is currently in the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle. Jules Bourgeois was a member of the Société naturelle de Colmar, chair of the Société entomologique de France in 1883,and prize winner of the Dollfus price in 1894 allotted by the same society.His ore and mineral collection of the Rouen valley is one of the treasures of the museum of natural history of his native area. In parallel, he was devoted to local history and collaborated actively in the Revue d’Alsace, Review of Alsace. Président de la Société industrielle de Sainte Marie-aux-Mines. Officier d’académie.