Synonyms for damnak or Related words with damnak

angk              trapeang              chrey              krasang              samraong              thmei              chhuk              boeng              lvea              khpos              tbaeng              kouk              kaoh              rumduol              pongro              beung              preaek              thnong              neak              knong              sangkae              thlok              damrei              trabaek              andoung              doung              thnal              kaong              khnar              stueng              chambak              tboung              praek              slaeng              russei              sambour              tnaot              phnum              sralau              ruessei              srey              kaeut              krapeu              tuek              neang              anlong              paoy              chrum              kbal              chrak             



Examples of "damnak"
Conferences occurring during the festival as being held at the CKS Centre for Khmer Study Conference Center at Wat Damnak (Siem reap)
A lane of the No 33 named No 33A detours at the "Kep White Horse Monument" in Damnak Chang'aeur District, running along the coast before rejoining No 33, some to the east.
Other structures include, Hor Samran Phirun, Hor Samrith Phimean, Damnak Chan, Phochani Pavilion (dance hall), Serey Monkol Pavilion (royal conference hall), King Jayavarman VII Pavilion, Vihear Suor (royal chapel), Villa Kantha Bopha, Villa Chumpou, Villa Sahametrei, and some less significant buildings in an area closed to the public.
Damnak Chang'aeur () is a district (Khan) in Kep Province, Cambodia. It is the largest district in the province and a train track from Phnom Penh to Sihanoukville runs through here. The district is subdivided into three sections (Sangkat) and 11 groups (Krom).
In June 1994, Phnom Voar in Damnak Chang'aeur hit the international headlines as the site of the kidnapping of three westerners, Australian David Wilson, 29, Briton Mark Slater, 28, and Frenchman Jean-Michel Braquet, 27 from a train by Khmer Rouge forces led by Commander Chouk Rin.
The Buddhist Institute of Cambodia notes that the original pagoda is over 800 years old and has been in continuous use as a temple. It is regarded as one of the holiest sites in Cambodian Buddhism. Parts of the original pagoda can still be seen around a small mound behind the vihear of the main temple. During the Khmer Rouge years, many stones from the old temple were taken to build an embankment and repair bridges at Damnak Ampil nearby.
Phnom Voar (Vine Mountain) () is a small range of mountains in southern Cambodia. The mountain range is located in Damnak Chang'eaur District of Kep Province, near the border with Kampot Province. This relatively isolated range became notorious as a battleground during the Cambodian Civil War, when it was a base for communist insurgent forces and the target of significant bombing by B-52s and other air strikes.
Wat Bakan or Bakan Pagoda is one of the oldest active pagodas in the country. The Buddhist Institute of Cambodia notes that the original pagoda is over 800 years old and has been in continuous use as a temple. It is regarded as one of the holiest sites in Cambodian Buddhism. Parts of the original pagoda can still be seen around a small mound behind one of the buildings of the main temple. During the Khmer Rouge years many stones from the old temple were taken to build an embankment and repair bridges at Damnak Ampil nearby.
Now abandoned, with the exception of the old post office, most of the buildings are still standing. The strategic importance of the location is underlined by the fact that the Cambodian authorities maintain a ranger station on the site. The only other historic building currently in use on the site is a small temple. There is also a waterfall which tends to be dry in high season and in full flow during rainy season. About 10 km before on the way for Bokor Hill Station there is the "Black Palace" ("Damnak Sla Khmao"). It was a little summer palace of King Sihanouk, abandoned some decades ago.
Pinglak is a lion in the story. Sanjeewak was a bull who, because of his incapability’s and illness was discarded by his master and was left alone in a jungle, where he sat on the bank of Yamuna river and grew stronger. Once, the king of the jungle, the lion named Pinglak came near the bank of river to quench his thirst, but when he listened to the threatening sound of Sanjeewak, he hidden himself under a tree. The lion had two cunning jackal ministers named Karkat and Damnak. When they saw lion threatened, Damnak went to Sanjeewak and somehow managed to bring friendship between Pinglak and Sanjeewak. The lion indulged so deeply in the friendship that he left his entire kingship. When all the animals in the jungle felt unsecured due to this, then the jackals again managed to create differences between Pinglak and Sanjeewak. And finally in a fight between the lion and the bull, the bull gets killed. These characters are in story of * "Mitra-bheda": The Separation of Friends (The Lion and the Bull) is one of the five books. Its original Indian version is as under;-
From December 10–12, 2008, the 2nd International Conférence, took place at the Centre for Khmer study conference hall in Wat Damnak. The conference was organized in collaboration with Khmer Ceramics ex National Center for Khmer Ceramics (NCKCR), and Heritage Watch, and formed part of the 2nd International Khmer Ceramics Festival which took place shortly afterwards from the 14-29th. The conference was dedicated to Dr. Roxanna Maude Brown, Director of the Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum at Bangkok University, who died on 14 May 2008. Dr. Brown was remembered for her involvement in the kiln reconstruction for the NCKCR, and what remains as the definitive work on the subject, her book, Southeast Asian Ceramics: Their Dating and Identification, published in Singapore, by Oxford University Press in 1988.
King Sisowath (1904–1927) made several major contributions to the current Royal Palace, adding the Phochani Hall in 1907 (inaugurated in 1912), and from 1913-1919 demolishing several old buildings, and replacing and expanding the old Chanchhaya Pavilion and the Throne Hall with the current structures. These buildings employ traditional Khmer artistic style and Angkorian inspired design, particularly in the Throne Hall, though some European elements remain. The next major construction came in the 1930s under King Monivong with the addition of the Royal Chapel, Vihear Suor (1930), and the demolition and replacement of the old Royal residence with the Khemarin Palace (1931), which serves as the official Royal residence to this day. To the reign of King Sihanouk other significant additions are the 1956 addition of the Villa Kantha Bopha to accommodate foreign guests and the 1953 construction of the Damnak Chan originally installed to house the High Council of the Throne.