Synonyms for devoke or Related words with devoke

crummock              badgworthy              breydon              spinoletta              esthwaite              hamford              whiteadder              canworthy              trumans              bougets              glazert              chironectes              copperbelly              draycote              chimarrogale              bowmont              treadin              carsington              meggat              hyemoschus              glaisnock              grafham              luggie              heldale              maich              fluvicola              canitoga              lugton              ochthornis              shinnel              karegnondi              starworts              kielder              hydropotes              arvicola              peakshole              neomys              polynya              nerodia              nuckro              goulburnmurray              wzetin              striders              euchan              coniston              leuraensis              bourton              endrick              dropworts              paraleptomys             



Examples of "devoke"
The fishing rights to Devoke Water are owned by Millom Anglers and it is stocked with brown trout. It also holds perch.
The central and northern areas of Birker Fell are dominated by composite andesite lava flows. Within the andesitic lava flows, the "Great Whinscale Dacite" lava flow and the associated, underlying "Little Stand Tuff" form a marker band that runs northeast-southwest across the fell, but are best seen at "Silver How" () and "Great Whinscale" (). A small area of basaltic material occurs approximately 1 km north of Birkerthwaite, composed of plagioclase- and pyroxene-phyric andesite-basalt lavas (the "Birkby Fell Member"), and tuff and lapilli-tuffs (the "Devoke Water Member"). The main outcrop of the Devoke Water Member occurs to the south-west of Devoke Water itself, on Ulpha Fell. The south and south-eastern portion of the fell is composed of a sequence of tuff beds with highly variable composition: from rhyolitic through to basaltic. These overlie the BFF and form the next section of the BVG sequence.
Devoke Water is a small lake in the mid-west region of the English Lake District, in the county of Cumbria. It is the largest tarn in the Lake District.
It can be reached via a bridle track. There is a two-storey stone boathouse-cum-refuge and a ruined stable. Devoke Water has an outlet in the north west, via Black Beck, which, after a short distance, plunges over rocks down a cascade, towards the River Esk.
One of the chapters of Alfred Wainwright's "The Outlying Fells of Lakeland" is a circular walk anticlockwise around Devoke Water, starting and finishing on the road to the east. He describes the summits Rough Crag at , Water Crag at , White Pike at , Yoadcastle at , Woodend Height at and Seat How at , and notes that White Pike has a "splendid columnar cairn" and a view to Muncaster Castle.
Woodend is the name of several places in Cumbria, England. One of these is situated between the Duddon Valley and the village of Ulpha and the valley of Eskdale, high up on Birker Fell, approximately 950 feet above sea level. It is claimed to have been an early Quaker settlement. With views towards Scafell Pike, England's highest mountain, it is very close to Devoke Water, one of the Lake District tarns.
There is also a significant number of place names which do not support this theory. Devoke Water and Cumdivock (< "Dyfoc", according to Ekwall) and Derwent (< Common Brittonic "Derwentiō") all have initial /d/. The name Calder (< Brit. "*Caletodubro-") in fact appears to show a voiced Cumbric consonant where Welsh has "Calettwr" by provection, which Jackson believes reflects an earlier stage of pronunciation. Jackson also notes that Old English had no internal or final /g/, so would be borrowed with /k/ by sound substitution. This can be seen in names with "c, k, ck" (e.g. Cocker < Brittonic "*kukro-", Eccles < Brittonic "eglēsia").
Water plays an important role in defining the character of Birker Fell. Between the crags flow many small streams, known as "becks" or "gills" in the local terminology. Many of the becks rise in one of the numerous bogs which occur in the area, the largest of which are "White Moss", "Sike Moss", "Tewitt Moss" and "Foxbield Moss". At the western edge of the fell lies Devoke Water, which claims the title of largest tarn in the Lake District. It lies at an altitude of 235 m (770 ft) and is approximately 1 km long (east-west) and 0.4 km wide. The southern border between Birker Fell and Ulpha Fell traces a line between Devoke Water and the valley of Crosby Gill, a large stream that drops down the southern flanks of the fell to the village of Ulpha in the Duddon Valley. The northern edge of the fell is marked by a steep range of crags which drop sharply to the floor of Eskdale. These crags are cut by the cascades of Stanley Force and Birker Force, two of the most spectacular waterfalls in the Lake District.
The headwaters of Eskdale and the Duddon are separated by a ridge falling south west from the summit of Crinkle Crags. This line of high ground continues over many twists and turns for 15 miles, finally meeting the sea on the slopes of Black Combe. From Crinkle Crags the first fells on this ridge are Hard Knott, Harter Fell and Green Crag. Alfred Wainwright considered the remainder of the range unworthy of inclusion in his influential "Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells", stating that ""south and west from Green Crag the scenery quickly deteriorates. This summit has therefore been taken as the boundary of fellwalking country."" Later guidebook writers have disagreed, adding Great Worm Crag, Yoadcastle, Whitfell, Buck Barrow, Black Combe and the low hills around Devoke Water to their hill lists. Wainwright himself later relented and included these lesser hills in a supplementary volume, "The Outlying Fells of Lakeland".
The headwaters of the River Esk and the Duddon are separated by a ridge falling south west from the summit of Crinkle Crags. This line of high ground continues over many twists and turns for , finally meeting the sea on the slopes of Black Combe. From Crinkle Crags the first fell on this ridge is Hard Knott, followed by Harter Fell and Green Crag. Alfred Wainwright did not include the remainder of the ridge in his influential ‘’Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells’’, but later guidebook writers have disagreed, adding Great Worm Crag, Yoadcastle, Whitfell, Buck Barrow, Black Combe and the low hills around Devoke Water to their main volumes. Wainwright himself later relented and included these lesser hills in a supplementary volume, "The Outlying Fells of Lakeland".