Synonyms for doiceau or Related words with doiceau

yvoir              olne              berloz              tilloy              gesves              louvignies              hollogne              nethen              doische              lontzen              dommartin              anthisnes              fernelmont              montgaillard              messancy              lezons              fauvillers              bazoches              rendeux              paliseul              viller              conteville              montaut              herbeumont              romagny              franqueville              montagnac              jodoigne              bertogne              sivry              hunawihr              nielles              obaix              poligny              cerfontaine              rognon              nouzonville              faimes              hamois              tournay              ciney              daours              momalle              aubange              moyenneville              soulaines              kemexhe              becquincourt              bertrix              dieuze             



Examples of "doiceau"
Zeebroeck Castle is a castle in Nethen, in the municipality of Grez-Doiceau, in the province of Walloon Brabant, Belgium.
The municipality consists of the following sub-municipalities: Archennes (Eerken), Biez, Bossut-Gottechain, Grez-Doiceau proper, and Nethen.
Grez-Doiceau is a Belgian municipality located in the province of Walloon Brabant. On January 1, 2006, Grez-Doiceau had a total population of 12,403. The total area is 55.44 km² which gives a population density of 224 inhabitants per km². Grez-Doiceay is watered by the Train, a tributary of the Dyle.
This table shows an overview of the protected heritage sites in the Walloon town Graven, or Grez-Doiceau. This list is part of Belgium's national heritage.
The Pécrot rail crash was a rail accident in the village of Pécrot (part of the municipality of Grez-Doiceau), Belgium, that occurred on 27 March 2001 when two passenger trains collided head-on. The crash left 8 dead and 12 injured and was Belgium's worst rail disaster in a quarter of a century.
Sophie Wilmès was born in the Ixelles municipality of the Brussels Capital Region. She grew up in the town of Grez-Doiceau in Wallonia and studied in university in Brussels. She has a degree in applied communication and a degree in financial management (Saint-Louis University, Brussels). She worked as an economic and financial adviser in a law firm.
The surname of Lecapitaine or LeCaptain is derived from the Belgian municipality of Grez-Doiceau in the province of Walloon Brabant, the birthplace of many Capetian Royalty and from multiple places around France, especially Paris, pertaining to the Capetian Dynasty. The name later reached North America and can be found with particular density in Wisconsin, as well as Africa.
Warner of Grez (also Werner or Garnier of Grey or Gray) (died July 23, 1100) Count of Grez, was a French nobleman from Grez-Doiceau, currently in Walloon Brabant in Belgium. He was one of the participants in the army of Godfrey of Bouillon of the First Crusade, and died in Jerusalem a year after the crusade ended. His brother Henry is also listed as a Count of Grez and accompanied Warner on the First Crusade.
The organization remains active, with a congress held in Naples in Sept 2009. The location of the institute's headquarters rotates according to the origin of the Secretary General. Since the election of Professor Joe Verhoeven as Secretary General in September 2003, the institute is headquartered in Grez-Doiceau, Belgium, with offices also at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. Its current members include, amongst other prominent lawyers and legal academics, judges of the International Criminal Court. Recent resolutions from the organization include, for example, a recommendation on immunity from prosecution for Heads of State, and the responsibility of national governments for environmental damage.
On 1 June 1942, Rumpelhardt was promoted to "Unteroffizier" (corporal). That night, he and Schnaufer claimed their first aerial victory on their thirteenth combat mission flown. Nominally this was the RAF's second 1,000 bomber raid against Germany, although the attacking force actually numbered 956 aircraft. They shot down a Handley Page Halifax south of Louvain in Belgium. The aircraft probably was a Halifax from No. 76 Squadron piloted by Sergeant Thomas Robert Augustus West, which was shot down at 01:55 on 2 June 1942 and crashed at Grez-Doiceau, south of Louvain. West and another member of the crew were killed. This victory was achieved by ground-controlled interception through the Kammhuber Line. Once near to the target, Rumpelhardt had visually found the bomber and directed Schnaufer into attack position from below and astern. Following two firing passes, the Halifax caught on fire. Both Rumpelhardt and Schnaufer were awarded the Iron Cross 2nd Class () for their first aerial victory.
Schnaufer claimed his first aerial victory on their thirteenth combat mission flown one day after the attack on Cologne on the night 1/2 June 1942. Nominally this was the RAF's second 1,000 bomber raid against Germany, although the attacking force actually numbered 956 aircraft. Schnaufer shot down a Handley Page Halifax south of Louvain in Belgium. The aircraft probably was a Halifax from No. 76 Squadron piloted by Sergeant Thomas Robert Augustus West, which was shot down at 01:55 on 2 June 1942 and crashed at Grez-Doiceau, south of Louvain. West and another member of the crew were killed. This victory was achieved by ground-controlled interception through the Kammhuber Line. Once near to the target, Rumpelhardt had visually found the bomber and directed Schnaufer into attack position from below and astern. The Halifax caught on fire after two firing passes. During this mission the "Himmelbett" flight officer vectored them to a second bomber, a Bristol Blenheim. The attack had to be aborted after "Hauptmann" (Captain) Walter Ehle shot down the bomber from a more favourable attack position. Shortly before 03:00, they were then flying in the vicinity of Ghent, they spotted another target. Schnaufer made two unsuccessful attacks. During their third attack, which closed the distance to , they were hit by the defensive gunfire. Schnaufer was hit in his left calf, the port engine was burning, the rudder control cables were severed, and an electrical short circuit caused the landing lights to be permanently on. Rumpelhardt and Schnaufer considered bailing out but decided to make an attempt for their home airfield after they managed to put out the flames and restart the engine. While Rumpelhardt made radio contact with the Sint-Truiden airbase, Schnaufer landed the aircraft without rudder control and on ailerons and engine-power alone. This was the only time that their aircraft sustained damage in combat or any member of the crew was wounded. Both Rumpelhardt and Schnaufer were awarded the Iron Cross 2nd Class () for their first aerial victory. Schnaufer had hoped that he could stay on active duty and that the bullet lodged in his calf would isolate itself. However, he had to be admitted to a hospital in Brussels from 8–25 June for surgery. Rumpelhardt was given home leave until 26 June while Schnaufer was in the hospital.
The Belgian revolution was recently described as firstly a conflict between the Brussels municipality which was secondly disseminated in the rest of the country, "particularly in the Walloon provinces". We read the nearly same opinion in Edmundson's book: The royal forces, on the morning of September 23, entered the city at three gates and advanced as far as the Park. But beyond that point they were unable to proceed, so desperate was the resistance, and such the hail of bullets that met them from barricades and from the windows and roofs of the houses. For three days almost without cessation the fierce contest went on, the troops losing ground rather than gaining it. On the evening of the 26th the prince gave orders to retreat, his troops having suffered severely. The effect of this withdrawal was to convert a street insurrection into a national revolt. The moderates now united with the liberals, and a Provisional Government was formed, having amongst its members Rogier, Van de Weyer, Gendebien, , Félix de Mérode and Louis de Potter, who a few days later returned triumphantly from banishment. The Provisional Government issued a series of decrees declaring Belgium independent, releasing the Belgian soldiers from their allegiance, and calling upon them to abandon the Dutch standard. They were obeyed. The revolt, which had been confined mainly to the Walloon districts, now spread rapidly over Flanders. Jacques Logie wrote: "On the 6th October, the whole Wallonia was under the Provisional Government's control. In the Flemish part of the country the collapse of the Royal Government was as total and quick as in Wallonia, except Ghent and Antwerp." Robert Demoulin who was Professor at the Université de Liège wrote: "Liège is in the forefront of the battle for liberty", more than Brussels but with Brussels. He wrote the same thing for Leuven. According to Demoulin, these three cities are the "républiques municipales" at the head of the Belgian revolution. In this chapter VI of his book, "Le soulèvement national" (pp. 93–117), before writing "On the 6th October, the whole Wallonia is free", he quotes the following municipalities from which volunteers were going to Brussels, the "centre of the commotion", in order to take part in the battle against the Dutch troops : Tournai, Namur, Wavre (p. 105) Braine-l'Alleud, Genappe, Jodoigne, Perwez, Rebecq, Grez-Doiceau, , Nivelles (p. 106), Charleroi (and its region), Gosselies, Lodelinsart (p. 107), Soignies, Leuze, Thuin, Jemappes (p. 108), Dour, Saint-Ghislain, (p. 109) and he concluded: "So, from the Walloon little towns and countryside, people came to the capital.." The Dutch fortresses were liberated in Ath ( 27 September), Mons (29 September), Tournai (2 October), Namur (4 October) (with the help of people coming from Andenne, Fosses, Gembloux), Charleroi (5 October) (with people who came in their thousands).The same day that was also the case for Philippeville, , Dinant, Bouillon. In Flanders, the Dutch troops capitulated at the same time in Brugge, Ieper, Oostende, Menen, Oudenaarde, Geeraardsbergen (pp. 113–114), but nor in Ghent nor in Antwerp (only liberated on 17 October and 27 October).