Synonyms for elephant_seal_mirounga or Related words with elephant_seal_mirounga

helmeted_curassow              grasshopper_mouse_onychomys              angustirostris              bottlenose_whale_hyperoodon_ampullatus              screamer_chauna              rockhopper_penguin_eudyptes_chrysocome              weddell_seal_leptonychotes_weddellii              freetail_bat              white_cheeked_gibbon              crabeater_seal_lobodon              royal_albatross_diomedea              brown_bandicoot_isoodon              leonina              pig_tailed_macaque              lapwing_vanellus              loggerhead_shrike_lanius_ludovicianus              crested_caracara              white_rhinoceros_ceratotherium              carcinophagus              rockhopper_penguin              bettong_bettongia              epomophora              cheriway              naked_tailed_armadillo              obesulus              sumatran_rhinoceros_dicerorhinus_sumatrensis              bottlenose_whale_hyperoodon_planifrons              fiscal_lanius_humeralis              goshawk_accipiter_gentilis              eurasian_sparrowhawk_accipiter_nisus              bassaricyon              bettongia_penicillata              minke_whale_balaenoptera_acutorostrata              greater_galago              euoticus              blarina_brevicauda              leadbeateri              pauxi_pauxi              giant_petrel              fiscal_lanius_collaris              hawk_owl_surnia_ulula              beardless_tyrannulet_camptostoma_imberbe              andean_lapwing              hairy_nosed_wombat_lasiorhinus              bog_lemming_synaptomys              ningaui              short_tailed_shrew              grey_shrike_lanius_meridionalis              lesser_bamboo_lemur              spotted_owl_strix             



Examples of "elephant_seal_mirounga"
Seals include the Antarctic fur seal "(Arctocephalus gazella)" and sub-Antarctic fur seal "(Arctocephalus tropicalis)" in large numbers, leopard seal "(Hydrurga leptonyx)", Weddell seal "(Leptonychotes weddellii)", the huge southern elephant seal "(Mirounga leonina)", and crabeater seal "(Lobodon carcinophagus)".
The seals of the Antarctic Ocean include leopard seal "(Hydrurga leptonyx)", Weddell seal "(Leptonychotes weddellii)", the huge southern elephant seal "(Mirounga leonina)", crabeater seal "(Lobodon carcinophagus)" and Ross seal ("Ommatophoca rossii").
Around the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia, the Antarctic fur seal ("Arctocephalus gazella") is the main prey. Other prey include penguins and fish. Antarctic krill ("Euphausia superba"), southern elephant seal ("Mirounga leonina") pups and seabirds other than penguins have also been found in leopard seal scats in small quantities.
The animals of Antarctica live on food they find in the sea—not on land—and include seabirds, seals and penguins. The seals include: leopard seal ("Hydrurga leptonyx"), Weddell seal ("Leptonychotes weddellii"), the huge southern elephant seal ("Mirounga leonina"), and crabeater seal ("Lobodon carcinophagus").
The southern elephant seal ("Mirounga leonina") is one of the two extant species of elephant seals. It is both the largest pinniped and member of the order Carnivora living today, as well as the largest Antarctic seal. The seal gets its name from its great size and the large proboscis of the adult males, which is used to make extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating season. Rather larger at average than the male northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris") (which is 40% lighter) and male walrus ("Odobenus rosmarus") (the average North Pacific bull, of the larger race, is 2.5 times lighter), the adult bull southern elephant seal is without rival the largest carnivoran alive. An average adult male southern elephant seal weighs six to seven times more than the largest terrestrial carnivorans, the polar bear ("Ursus maritimus") and Kodiak bear ("Ursus arctos middendorffi").
Many island or marine species that reside on or near Guadalupe also frequent the Channel Islands, and vice versa. In stark contrast to the rampant extinction of terrestrial life that happened at the same time, Guadalupe was the last refuge for the northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris") and the Guadalupe fur seal ("Arctocephalus townsendi") in the 1890s. The island has been a pinniped sanctuary since 1975.
Seven pinniped species inhabit Antarctica. The largest, the elephant seal ("Mirounga leonina"), can reach up to , while females of the smallest, the Antarctic fur seal ("Arctocephalus gazella"), reach only . These two species live north of the sea ice, and breed in harems on beaches. The other four species can live on the sea ice. Crabeater seals ("Lobodon carcinophagus") and Weddell seals ("Leptonychotes weddellii") form breeding colonies, whereas leopard seals ("Hydrurga leptonyx") and Ross seals ("Ommatophoca rossii") live solitary lives. Although these species hunt underwater, they breed on land or ice and spend a great deal of time there, as they have no terrestrial predators.
Mirounga Point () is the east entrance point to Potter Cove, King George Island, in the South Shetland Islands off Antarctica. The feature was called "Punta Baliza" (beacon point) by R. Araya and F. Herve in 1966. It was later called "Punta Elefante" by the Argentine Antarctic Expedition after the elephant seal ("Mirounga leonina"), in connection with the establishment of Site of Special Scientific Interest number 13 (now Antarctic Specially Protected Area 132) in this vicinity under the Antarctic Treaty. The approved name avoids the duplication of Elephant Point on Livingston Island.
Carnivora (; from Latin "carō" (stem "carn-") "flesh" and "vorāre" "to devour") is a diverse scrotiferan order that includes over 280 species of placental mammals. Its members are formally referred to as carnivorans, whereas the word "carnivore" (often popularly applied to members of this group) can refer to any meat-eating organism. Carnivorans are the most diverse in size of any mammalian order, ranging from the least weasel ("Mustela nivalis"), at as little as and , to the polar bear ("Ursus maritimus"), which can weigh up to , to the southern elephant seal ("Mirounga leonina"), whose adult males weigh up to and measure up to in length.
Guadalupe Island is a volcano with a height of 5800 m. Its surface area is approximately 250 km². It is a center of endemism with 34 species of plants, including two classes (Redman and Moran, 1997); eight land birds; one sea bird; eleven land snails; and at least 18 species of insects (Gonzales, 1981). The island is an important breeding site for marine mammals such as the Guadalupe fur seal ("Arctocephalus townsendi"), elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris"), and numerous species of birds, including the Laysan albatross ("Phoebastria immutabilis").
Seven pinniped species inhabit Antarctica. The largest, the elephant seal ("Mirounga leonina"), can reach up to , while females of the smallest, the Antarctic fur seal ("Arctocephalus gazella"), reach only . These two species live north of the sea ice, and breed in harems on beaches. The other four species can live on the sea ice. Crabeater seals ("Lobodon carcinophagus") and Weddell seals ("Leptonychotes weddellii") form breeding colonies, whereas leopard seals ("Hydrurga leptonyx") and Ross seals ("Ommatophoca rossii") live solitary lives. Although these species hunt underwater, they breed on land or ice and spend a great deal of time there, as they have no terrestrial predators.
The northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris") is one of two species of elephant seal (the other is the southern elephant seal). It is a member of the family" Phocidae" ("true seals"). Elephant seals derive their name from their great size and from the male's large proboscis, which is used in making extraordinarily loud roaring noises, especially during the mating competition. Sexual dimorphism in size is great: The males can grow to and , while the females grow to and . Correspondingly, the mating system is highly polygynous; a successful male is able to impregnate up to 50 females in one season.
Because of the location in a high tidal current area, there is an exceptional variety of marine life to be found, including marine mammals, sea birds, fish, marine invertebrates, and marine algae and sea grass. It is a haulout area for California and Northern sealions and a birthing rookery for Harbour seals and it is also the most northerly birthing colony on the Pacific Coast of North America for the elephant seal,"Mirounga-angustirostris". A detailed taxonomy and species database is maintained on the site.
All six Antarctic seals can be found here, the two fur seals, leopard seal ("Hydrurga leptonyx"), Weddell seal ("Leptonychotes weddellii"), southern elephant seal ("Mirounga leonina"), and crabeater seal ("Lobodon carcinophagus")). The fur seals and southern elephant seal breed in the region, and are increasing in numbers now that seal-hunting has stopped, while large numbers of leopard seals winter on the rocks of Heard Island. The colony of southern elephant seals on Heard Island and the Kerguelens is one of the three largest in the world.
In 1963 the Russian magazine "Priroda" (Nature), official journal of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, published an article reporting a possible sighting. In 1962 the whaling ship "Buran" had reported a group of large marine mammals in shallow water in Cape Navarin off Kamchatka in the Gulf of Anadyr, grazing on seaweed. The crew reported seeing a small group of six large animals ranging from , with trunks and split lips. There have also been reports from local fishermen in the northern Kuril Islands, and around the Kamchatka and Chukchi peninsulas. These possible sightings may be attributed to large arctic marine mammals, such as the narwhal ("Monodon monoceros") and the Northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris").
During the day, Pacific angelsharks are almost never seen in the open, instead resting motionless on the sea floor buried under a thin layer of sediment that disguises their outlines. At night some individuals remain motionless, waiting for prey, while others may be encountered on the bottom unburied or actively swimming. Large sharks, including the great white shark ("Carcharodon carcharias") and the broadnose sevengill shark ("Notorynchus cepedianus"), and the northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris") are known to consume Pacific angelsharks. Known parasites of this species include the copepod "Trebius latifurcatus", which infests the skin, the myxosporidian "Chloromyxum levigatum", which infests the gall bladder, and the tapeworm "Paraberrapex manifestus", which infests the spiral valve intestine. The leech "Branchellion lobata" may be attached around this shark's cloaca, inside the intestine, and even inside the uterus and on developing embryos.
Guadalupe Island was a major destination for Russian and American fur hunters seeking the Guadalupe fur seal ("Arctocephalus townsendi") in the 18th and 19th centuries, until they were nearly extinct by 1844. Captain Auguste Duhaut-Cilly reported in 1827 that a Sandwich Islands (Hawaiian Islands) brig "had spent several months there and collected three thousand sealskins". The northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris") was also ruthlessly hunted for the oil in its blubber. They were thought to be extinct in 1884 until a remnant population of eight individuals was discovered on Guadalupe Island in 1892 by a Smithsonian expedition, who promptly killed seven of them for their collections. The elephant seals managed to survive, and were finally protected by the Mexican government in 1922. All surviving northern elephant seals share the same male ancestor.
During the day, the thornback guitarfish spends much time partially buried in sediment. It may be encountered singly, in small groups, or in large aggregations that form seasonally in particular bays and sloughs. The diet of this ray consists of polychaete worms, crustaceans (including crabs, shrimps, and isopods), squids, and small bony fishes (including anchovies, sardines, gobies, sculpins, and surfperches). It can detect prey with its electroreceptive ampullae of Lorenzini, which are most sensitive to electric fields with a frequency of 5–15 Hz. In turn, the thornback guitarfish is preyed upon by sharks and the northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris"). Known parasites of this species include the tapeworm "Echinobothrium californiense" and the nematode "Proleptus acutus". Thornback guitarfish mate in late summer, and females give birth the following year at around the same time, peaking in August. It is aplacental viviparous, with developing embryos sustained until birth by yolk.
The horn shark is preyed upon by larger fishes and the northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris"), which consumes adults, juveniles, and egg cases. In addition, they are captured and eaten by bald eagles ("Haliaeetus leucocephalus") at Catalina Island, and large marine snails are able to drill into their egg cases to extract the yolk. The tough skin and spines of this species confer some protection; a Pacific angelshark ("Squatina californica") has been filmed engulfing a juvenile horn shark, only to spit it out due to its spines. Known parasites of this species include the tapeworms "Acanthobothrium bajaensis" and "Acanthobothrium puertecitense", the copepod "Trebius heterodonti", and the nematode "Echinocephalus pseudouncinatus", which spends its larval stage inside potential prey such as scallops and sea urchins.
The sei whale ("Balaenoptera borealis") and the minke whale ("Balaenoptera acutorostrata") are the main hosts of "P. balaenopterae". Most species of "Pennella" have intermediate hosts which are important for the life cycle of the species, but the intermediate host of "Pennella balaenopterae" is not known. There have been recent records of this species parasitising pinnipeds, namely a northern elephant seal ("Mirounga angustirostris") in the north Pacific and from fin whale, ("Balaenoptera physalus") Cuvier's beaked whale ("Ziphius cavirostris"), Risso's dolphin ("Grampus griseus"), the bottlenose dolphin ("Tursiops truncatus") in the Adriatic Sea and harbour porpoise "Phocoena phocoena relicta" in the Aegean Sea. The early development of the larvae takes place in the egg sac while it is still attached to the female until it is released into the water column possessing a full set of cephalic appendages and three pairs of thoracic legs. The larval form then finds an intermediate host where it remains and develops into the copepodid stages. After development of the attachment mouthparts, the female copepod finds its definitive host where it then permanently attaches. Females can produce from 300 to 700 eggs in each of her paired egg sacs while engorged and attached to her definitive host. Males remain as free swimming copepodids but the females have a distinctive anchoring processes that extend from its anterior end. After both sexes have reached full sexual maturity copulation occurs, after which the male dies. The female then loses all external segmentation and grows drastically in size. Both temperature and salinity are important factors to ensure successful reproduction.