Synonyms for exochi or Related words with exochi

palaiochori              perivoli              kerasea              kranea              eleftherio              livadero              parapotamos              zitsa              kalyvia              drymos              karitsa              vrysi              ypatis              fourka              chrysavgi              kechros              petrochori              lefki              neochori              kerasia              eleftherochori              kryoneri              sidironero              mesorrachi              paliampela              oreino              krini              polydendri              lagkada              kefalochori              kastania              kalyvakia              potamia              mesochori              koilada              kainourgio              koryfi              stavroupoli              palaiopyrgos              makrychori              kotyli              leptokarya              rodopoli              oropou              dotsiko              kleidonia              pentalofos              lefkonas              loutra              dafnoula             



Examples of "exochi"
The community of Exochi consists of two settlements: Exochi and Toxo. The community of Lagorrachi consists of the settlements of Lagorrachi and Meliadi.
Exochi () is a community in the municipality Topeiros in the Xanthi regional unit of Greece. It consists of the settlements Exochi, Vaniano, Gkizela, Dafni, Kossos, Kypseli, Melissa and Nea Amisos.
Exochi (Greek: Εξοχή meaning "countryside") may refer to several villages in Greece:
The village of Toxo (137 residents as of 2011) is part of the community of Exochi.
Exochi () is a village and a community of the Kozani municipality. Before the 2011 local government reform it was part of the municipality of Kozani, of which it was a municipal district. The 2011 census recorded 114 inhabitants in the community. The community of Exochi covers an area of 16.92 km.
Exochi () is a village and a community of the Pylaia-Chortiatis municipality. Before the 2011 local government reform it was part of the municipality of Chortiatis, of which it was a municipal district. The 2011 census recorded 1,280 inhabitants in the community. The community of Exochi covers an area of 2.575 km.
Kossos () is a settlement in the community Exochi, Xanthi regional unit, Greece. It is located northwest of Exochi and 13 kilometers southwest of Xanthi. In 1981, the population of Kossos was around 68 inhabitants. In 1991, the population slightly rose to around 76 inhabitants.
Makaza–Nymfaia is the sixth functioning border checkpoint between Bulgaria and Greece, along with Kulata–Promachonas, Ilinden–Exochi, Zlatograd–Thermes, Ivaylovgrad–Kyprinos, and Svilengrad–Ormenio.
Greek National Road 57 is a national highway of Greece. It connects Drama with the Bulgarian border near Exochi, via Prosotsani and Kato Nevrokopi. At the border it is connected with the Bulgarian national road 19 to Gotse Delchev.
Exochi () is a village and a community of the Katerini municipality. Before the 2011 local government reform it was part of the municipality of Elafina, of which it was a municipal district. The 2011 census recorded 446 residents in the village and 583 in the community.
Before the Greco-Turkish population exchange the village, called Bairakli, was inhabited exclusively by Turks. After the population exchange the village was resettled by Greek refugees. The original settlement was evacuated in 1980, as the Public Power Corporation of Greece expanded its lignite mines towards the village. The contemporary settlement of Exochi is adjacent to the community of Koila.
Giona () is a settlement in the Xanthi regional unit of Greece, part of the community of Avdira. It is located 9 kilometers northwest of Avdira, 9 kilometers northwest of Magiko, 11 kilometers northeast of Genisea, 7 kilometers west of Exochi, 4 kilometers east southeast of Pezoula, and 18.2 kilometers from Xanthi. In 1991, the population of Giona was around 154 inhabitants.
Dositheus was born in Arachova (today the village of Exochi, Achaea) on May 31, 1641. Little of his early life is known. He was ordained a deacon in 1652 and elevated to archdeacon of Jerusalem in 1661. In 1666, he was consecrated archbishop of Caesarea Palestinae (now Ḥorbat Qesari, Israel). In 1669, he was elected patriarch of Jerusalem.
Neilson served in the Lovat Scouts and the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders during the First World War and was holding the rank of sergeant when he was killed in Greece during the Salonika Campaign on 28 October 1917. He was buried in Kirechkoi-Hortakoi Military Cemetery, near Exochi. His brothers Rolland and Charles were also killed during the war.
Koila () is a community of the city of Kozani in northern Greece. It is located 4 km north of the center of the city, between Kozani and Via Egnatia. It consists of Koila and three other settlements: Kardia, Exochi and Melissia. The population is 1,643 (2011).
Toxo () is a village of the Katerini municipality. Before the 2011 local government reform it was part of the municipality of Elafina, of which it was a municipal district. The 2011 census recorded 137 inhabitants in the village. Toxo is a part of the community of Exochi.
Mesochora (Greek: Μεσοχώρα, before 1928: Βιτσίστα - "Vitsista") is a mountain village in the municipal unit of Pindos in the southwestern part of the Trikala regional unit, Greece. It is located in the Athamanika mountains (southern Pindus), on the upper course of the river Acheloos, about 800 m above sea level. It is situated 40 km west of the city of Trikala. It is located by the Greek National Road 30 (Trikala - Arta). In 2011 Mesochora had a population of 141 for the settlement, and 143 for the community, including the small villages Exochi and Spitia. It became a part of the municipality of Pindos in 1997 under the Capodistrian Plan.
The municipality has been isolated from the big industrial centers in Bulgaria due to its geographic location near the closed border with Greece for about sixty years and the lack of natural resources, the long distances between Gotse Delchev and other bigger towns, and the narrow and poorly maintained roads. After the opening of the Ilinden–Exochi border-crossing and improving the road system in the area, the economy of the municipality changed. The light industry is well presented in the town of Gotse Delchev. The textile and shoe industry, zipper production, plastics processing, paper industry, wood industry and wood processing, tobacco growing and processing are the major sources of the income of the municipality. There are no big department stores, but a wide variety of smaller shops are present in the town.
The municipality has been isolated from the big industrial centers in Bulgaria due to its geographic location near the closed border with Greece for about sixty years and the lack of natural resources, the long distances between Gotse Delchev and other bigger towns and the narrow and poorly maintained roads. After the opening of the Ilinden-Exochi border-crossing and improving the road system in the area the economy of the municipality changed. The light industry is well presented, especially in the town of Gotse Delchev. The textile and shoe industry, zippers producing, plastics processing, paper industry, wood industry and wood processing, tobacco growing and processing are the major sources of the income of the municipality. There aren't industrial subjects in the mountainous villages.
Lyalevo lay in the southeastern part of the Pirin mountains, in the southern part of the region of Pirin Macedonia. It was located at the foot of the Lalevski Vrah or Sveta Elena (Saint Helena) summit, from the town of Gotse Delchev (Nevrokop). Today, its ruins fall administratively within Bulgarian Blagoevgrad Province's Hadzhidimovo Municipality, close to the border with Greece and the Ilinden–Exochi border crossing. Lyalevo was mentioned as "Lyaleva" in Ottoman tax registers of 1623–1625 and 1635–1637 as a place populated by two Christian households. After 1821, though, the population mostly consisted of Greek-speaking Muslims. According to traditional stories recorded by Bulgarian ethnographer Vasil Kanchov, those Greeks came from the Chalkidiki peninsula on the Aegean Sea in the first quarter of the 19th century. They fled their home places and converted to Islam following the massacres in the wake of an unsuccessful anti-Ottoman uprising in 1821, as part of the Greek War of Independence. In 1845, Russian slavist Viktor Grigorovich mentions the village as "Lyaluhu" and calls its residents "Greek Pomaks". Serbian scholar Stefan Verković notes that "Lyalyuvo" had 90 households or a population 300 Greek Muslims in 1889. Vasil Kanchov's study of 1900 records the population of "Lalyovo" as 620 Greek Muslims.