Synonyms for fournoi or Related words with fournoi

korseon              elafonisos              oinousses              irakleia              thymaina              megisti              kastos              gialos              kythnos              leipsoi              kasos              agathonisi              donousa              arkoi              polichnitos              loutro              vasilika              kampos              alonissos              folegandros              agkistri              mathraki              kirykos              kryoneri              strongyli              livadi              gyaros              kalyvia              meganisi              vathy              mantamados              kimolos              potamia              krya              nisyros              ermioni              makronisos              astypalaia              sostis              kalolimnos              vrysi              schoinoussa              perivoli              panormos              myloi              palaiochori              antiparos              agistri              perivolia              dytiki             



Examples of "fournoi"
Fournoi Korseon ( or - Fournoi Ikarias), more commonly simply Fournoi, is a complex or archipelago of small Greek islands that lie between Ikaria, Samos and Patmos in Ikaria regional unit, North Aegean region. The two largest islands of the complex, the main isle of Fournoi and the isle of Thymaina , are inhabited, as is Agios Minas Island to the east. The municipality has an area of 45.247 km. On the main isle Fournoi (town) is the largest settlement and then Chrysomilia in the north the second largest (and third largest overall, after Thymaina). Fournoi (town) proper is the main ferry harbour, with ferries also landing on Thymaina.
Agios Minas () is a Greek island in Fournoi Korseon cluster. It is located east of Fournoi. Agios Minas is the third largest island of the cluster with an area of 2.5 km. On the island, only few shepherds live occasionally. The population of the island is 3 inhabitants according to 2011 census. Administratively, Agios Minas belongs to Ikaria (regional unit) and Fournoi Korseon municipality.
Icarian Greeks are closely related to other Aegean island Greeks, such as Greeks from Samos, Chios, Fournoi Korseon and Patmos, as well as Greeks from Anatolia.
The main island of Fournoi has a population of 1,320 (), or over 90 percent of the municipality's population. The only other inhabited islands are Agios Minas, and Thymaina.
Ikaria () is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the region of North Aegean. The regional unit covers the island of Ikaria and the small archipelago Fournoi Korseon, in the Aegean Sea.
Thymaina () is a small Greek island in the Ikaria regional unit, in the eastern Aegean Sea. Thymaina is located just west of Fournoi Korseon and is administratively a part of its municipality. Its name is said to be derived from the thyme that grows throughout the island. Thymaina has two settlements, Thymaina settlement and Keramidou. The population of the island is 143 inhabitants according to 2011 census, 136 in Thymaina settlement and 7 in Keramidou and the area is . Thymaina is a protected area along with all Fournoi cluster and belongs to the network Natura 2000.
Samos Prefecture () was a prefecture in Greece, consisting of the islands of Samos, Ikaria and the smaller islands of Fournoi Korseon. In 2011 the prefecture was abolished and the territory is now covered by the regional units of Samos and Ikaria. Its capital was the town of Vathy, on Samos.
On July 18, 1912, the Free State of Icaria (Ελευθέρα Πολιτεία Ικαρίας, "Elefthéra Politía Ikarías") was declared. The neighboring islands of Fournoi Korseon were also liberated and became part of the Free State. Ioannis Malahias (Ιωάννης Μαλαχίας) was the first and only president of the Free State of Icaria.
Until the Kallikratis reform, the region consisted of the three prefectures of Samos, Chios and Lesbos. Since 1 January 2011 it is divided into five regional units, formed around: Chios, Ikaria, Lemnos, Lesbos and Samos. The total number of islands in the North Aegean region are nine: Lesbos, Chios, Psara, Oinousses, Ikaria, Fournoi Korseon, Lemnos, Agios Efstratios and Samos.
An Icarian diaspora is found throughout Greece, specifically on Thimena and Fournoi Korseon, as well as in Athens, where a large community is found. The Icarian diaspora can be found throughout the world, mainly in Australia, United States, Canada and United Kingdom.
The Icarian Sea (, "Ikario Pelagos") is a subdivision of the Mediterranean Sea that lies between the Cyclades and Asia Minor. It is described as the part of the Aegean Sea to the south of Chios, to the east of the Eastern Cyclades and west of Anatolia. It contains the islands of Samos, Cos, Patmos, Leros, Fournoi Korseon and Icaria.
With the Treaty of London, on 3 February 1830, however, which determined the borders of the newly established Greek state, the freed islands of the Eastern Sporades were given over to the Ottoman Empire again. In the "Diary of the Prefecture of the Archipelago" of 1886, Leros, along with the islands of Patmos, Lipsos and Fournoi, belonged to the Ottomans. The island's administrative council was made up of both Greeks and Turks.
Within this group, the main islands in the northeastern Aegean Sea and along the Turkish coast are the Greek islands of Samos, Ikaria, Chios, Lesbos, Lemnos, Agios Efstratios, Psara, Fournoi Korseon, Oinousses and the Turkish islands of Imbros (Gökçeada), Tenedos (Bozcaada) and the Rabbit or "Tavşan" Islands. The main islands in the Thracian Sea in the far north are the Greek islands of Samothrace and Thasos.
Lesbos is a separate regional unit of the North Aegean region, and is one of five governing islands within it. The others are Chios, Ikaria, Lemnos, and Samos. The total number of islands governed by the North Aegean are nine: Lesbos, Chios, Psara, Oinousses, Ikaria, Fournoi Korseon, Lemnos, Agios Efstratios and Samos. The capital of the North Aegean Region is Mytilene. The population of Lesbos is approximately 86,000, a third of whom live in its capital, Mytilene, in the southeastern part of the island. The remaining population is distributed in small towns and villages. The largest are Plomari, Kalloni, the Gera Villages, Agiassos, Eresos, and Molyvos (the ancient Mythimna).
The Turkish government has avoided stating exactly which islets it wishes to include in this category. On various occasions, Turkish government sources have indicated that islands such as Pserimos, Agathonisi, Fournoi and Gavdos (situated south of Crete) might be included. Most of them, unlike Imia/Kardak, had undeniably been in factual Greek possession, which had never previously been challenged by Turkey, and all but the final two listed below have Greek residents and infrastructure. In a 2004 publication by Turkish authors close to the Turkish military leadership the following (among other, even smaller ones) were listed as potentially "grey" areas:
Evripidis Bakirtzis (; 16 January 1895 – 9 March 1947), born in Kozani (or according to other sources in Serres), Ottoman Empire, was a Hellenic Army officer and politician. Dismissed from the army twice due to his participation in pro-republican coup attempts, during the Axis Occupation of Greece in World War II he co-founded the EKKA resistance group and later joined the Greek People's Liberation Army. He served as head of the Political Committee of National Liberation, a government of Greek Resistance-held territories, from 10 March to 18 April 1944. He died in Fournoi Korseon.
After the fall of Leros, which was received with shock by the British public, Samos and the other smaller islands were evacuated. The Germans bombed Samos with Stukas, prompting the 2,500-strong Italian garrison to surrender on 22 November. Along with the occupation of the smaller islands of Patmos, Fournoi and Ikaria on 18 November, the Germans thus completed their conquest of the Dodecanese, which they were to continue to hold until the end of the war. The Battle of Leros was considered by some to be the last great defeat of the British Army in the Second World War and one of the last German victories. The German victory was predominantly due to their possession of complete air superiority, which caused great losses to the Allies, especially in ships, and enabled the Germans to supply and support their own forces effectively. Brigadier Tilney's scrapping of the original defensive plan, the work of Lt Col Maurice French, aided the Germans whose tactics, including scramble landings and an audacious air assault, further confused Tilney. The whole operation was criticised by many at the time as another useless "Gallipoli"-like disaster, and the blame was laid at Churchill's door.
After the fall of Leros, Samos and the other smaller islands were evacuated. The Germans bombed Samos with Ju 87 ("Stukas") of I "Gruppe, Stukageschwader" 3 in Megara, prompting the 2,500-strong Italian garrison to surrender on 22 November. Along with the occupation of the smaller islands of Patmos, Fournoi and Ikaria on 18 November, the Germans completed their conquest of the Dodecanese, which they held until the end of the war. The Dodecanese campaign was one of the last great defeats of the British Army in World War II, and one of the last German victories, while others have labelled it a hapless fiasco which was badly conceived, planned and executed as a "shoestring strategy". The German victory was predominantly due to their possession of air superiority, which caused great losses to the Allies, especially in ships and enabled the Germans to supply their forces. The operation was criticized by many at the time as another useless Gallipoli-like disaster and laid the blame at Churchill's door; perhaps unfairly so, since he had pushed for these efforts to be made far sooner, before the Germans were prepared.