Synonyms for fower or Related words with fower

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Examples of "fower"
She smashed fower chairs, and the landlord com in,
Fower sovereygnes reygnes (a thing not often seen);
"Thor was fower-an-twenty on the 'bus, man, hoo they danced an' sung;"
Nouns of measure and quantity unchanged in the plural: "fower fit" (four feet), "twa mile" (two miles), "five pund" (five pounds), "three hunderwecht" (three hundredweight).
In 1576 George Baker published a translation of the "Evonymus" of Conrad Gessner under the title of "The Newe Jewell of Health, wherein is contained the most excellent Secretes of Physicke and Philosophie divided into fower bookes".
"It was ordered that there shall be 2 divisions of Meadow, the one nerrer, the other farther, the nerrest shall haue fower Acres to Each 100h(£), the other left to farther Consideration.
In 2006 an Aberdeen hotel decided to use a Doric voice for their lift. Phrases said by the lift include "Gyaun Up" (Going up), "Gyaun Doun" (Going down), "atween fleers een an fower" (between floors one and four).
"Mary Hamilton," or "The Fower Maries" ("The Four Marys"), is a common name for a well-known sixteenth-century ballad from Scotland based on an apparently fictional incident about a lady-in-waiting to a Queen of Scotland. It is Child Ballad 173 and Roud 79.
It is one of the "Fower stately Wood Nymphs" (Michael Drayton, 1611, Poly-Olbion, Song 17) of the Forest Ridge (the other three being Worth, Ashdown and Waterdown forests) which were part of the ancient Andreaswald or Andreadswald, now the Weald.
To the memorie of the truly vertuous and religious the Lady Ursula Chichester daughter to Sr. William Strode of Newingeam, Knight, and wife to Sr. John Chichester of Hall, Knight, by whome she had issue seven sonnes and two daughters whereof survive fower sonnes, two sonnes & one daught. heere buried. She departed this life in the true faith of Christ Jesus and was heere enterred the 6th (5th?) day of July Anno D(omi)ni 1635 aetat(is) suae (47?).
""To the memorie of the truly vertuous and religious the Lady Ursula Chichester daughter to Sr. William Strode of Newingeam, Knight, and wife to Sr. John Chichester of Hall, Knight, by whome she had issue seven sonnes and two daughters whereof survive fower sonnes, two sonnes & one daught. heere buried. She departed this life in the true faith of Christ Jesus and was heere enterred the 6th (5th?) day of July Anno D(omi)ni 1635 aetat(is) suae (47?).
To the memorie of the truly vertuous and religious the Lady Ursula Chichester daughter to Sr. William Strode of Newingeam, Knight, and wife to Sr. John Chichester of Hall, Knight, by whome she had issue seven sonnes and two daughters whereof survive fower sonnes, two sonnes & one daught. heere buried. She departed this life in the true faith of Christ Jesus and was heere enterred the 6th (5th?) day of July Anno D(omi)ni 1635 aetat(is) suae (47?).
Upon his return to England, Whythorne served as a music tutor in Cambridge and London, where he survived a Bubonic plague outbreak in 1563 that killed members of his household. In 1571, he was appointed master of music at the Chapel of Archbishop Parker and published seventy-six "Songes for Three, Fower, and Five voyces", the only English secular music known to have been published between 1530 and 1588. Another mentionable work, composed in 1590, is Whythorne's "Duos or Songs for Two Voices."
The pronunciation of the digits 3, 4, 5, and 9 differs from standard English – being pronounced "tree", "fower", "fife", and "niner". The digit 3 is specified as "tree" so that it is not pronounced "sri"; the long pronunciation of 4 (still found in some English dialects) keeps it somewhat distinct from "for"; 5 is pronounced with a second "f" because the normal pronunciation with a "v" is easily confused with "fire" (a command to shoot); and 9 has an extra syllable to keep it distinct from German "nein" 'no'.
The site of the old church is almost in the centre of the pre-Norman Ballybetagh, old town land of Boyounagh. In the 16th/17th century inquisitions it was returned to grand juries as "Ye Fower quarters" of Boyounagh belonging to the Protestant Archbishop of Tuam. The old church of Boyounagh was sited in and surrounded by church lands. In modern times these four quarters consist of eight ordnance survey town lands including Cloonkeen, Meelick, Boyounagh Beg, alias Cunningham village, Boyounagh More alias Middletown and Cashel. In the latter days of landlordism it was called the Boyounagh Estate
His book on horsemanship, "The arte of ryding and breakinge greate horses", was published about 1560 and is the first work on equitation published in English. It is an abridged and adapted translation, made at the suggestion of John Astley, of "Gli ordini di cavalcare" by Federico Grisone, and is directed towards the use of horses in war. He followed it with "The fower chiefyst offices belonging to Horsemanshippe" (1565–6), which included a revised translation of Grisone together with other treatises. It was praised as "Xenophontean" by Gabriel Harvey.
The land for the settlement was square of Native American land in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and was purchased from the Nipmuc Indians, “for divers good and vallewable considerations them there unto Moovinge and especiall for an in consideration of the summe of twenty fower pound Ster.” In 1662, "Squinshepauke Plantation was started at the Netmocke settlement and plantation", and was incorporated as the town of Mendon in 1667. The settlers were ambitious and set about clearing the roads that would mark settlement patterns throughout the town’s history.
In 1606, King James I of England created the Colony of Virginia. He gave the London Company the right to "begin theire plantacions and habitacions in some fitt and conveniente place between fower and thirtie and one and fortie degrees of the said latitude all alongest the coaste of Virginia and coastes of America." The Jamestown Settlement was established roughly at the midpoint of that territory. The later Pilgrim (Plymouth Colony) settlers originally bound for the northern portion of the Virginia territory. Instead, they landed north of the 41st parallel on Cape Cod, where they had exclusive rights to the land under the charter for the Plymouth Colony.
There, however, he published Ashwell's letter, together with an elaborate reply to all the charges preferred against him. The pamphlet, of which very few copies are now extant, bears the title 'The Letter whyche Johan Ashwell, Priour of Newnham Abbey besydes Bedforde, sente secretly to the Byshope of Lyncolne in the yeare of our Lord MDXXVII. Where in the sayde Priour accuseth George Joye, that tyme beyng fellow of Peter College in Cambridge of fower opinions; with the Answere of the sayde George unto the same opinions.' The colophon runs: 'At Strazburge 10 daye of June. Thys lytell boke be delyvered to Johan Ashwell at Newnham Abbey besyde Bedforde with spede.'
Gong farmer (also gongfermor, gongfermour, gong-fayer, gong-fower or gong scourer) was a term that entered use in Tudor England to describe someone who dug out and removed human excrement from privies and cesspits; the word "gong" was used for both a privy and its contents. Gong farmers were only allowed to work at night, hence they were sometimes known as nightmen. The waste they collected, known as night soil, had to be taken outside the city or town boundary or to official dumps for disposal.