Synonyms for fzd or Related words with fzd

plexin              baffr              nectin              neuropilin              frizzled              ceacam              prlr              bcma              taci              trii              tweakr              ngr              glypican              bmprii              ectodomains              ldcam              pilr              rgmb              crig              tgfrii              sirp              tnfrsf              pellino              pirb              tnfr              neokine              netrin              draxin              misrii              sclerostin              kremen              lilrb              madcam              mesothelin              trkc              epha              tnfsf              frizzleds              flrg              neuropilins              ectodysplasin              norrin              neogenin              endosialin              ephrin              paqr              sorla              secad              tigit              siglec             



Examples of "fzd"
"In vivo" data supports a critical role for SFRP1 in ischemia-induced angiogenesis in adults. Using adenovirus-expressing SFRP1, impaired the canonical Wnt/Fzd pathway in the early phase of ischemia and as a result reduced vascular cell proliferation and delayed vessel formation. When SFRP1 was induced specifically in ECs along the kinetics of ischemia repair, a biphasic response was seen: a delay in capillary formation until day 15 and then an increase in vascular formation at day 25. This indicates that SFRP1 can fine tune the outcome of Wnt/Fzd signaling at different steps in the course of neovessel formation.
Members of the 'frizzled' gene family encode 7-transmembrane domain proteins that are receptors for WNT signaling proteins. The FZD6 protein contains a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich domain in the N-terminal extracellular region, and 7 transmembrane domains. However, unlike many other FZD family members, FDZ6 does not contain a C-terminal PDZ domain-binding motif. The FZD6 protein is believed to be the receptor for the WNT4 ligand.
Lévi-Strauss also discovered that a wide range of historically unrelated cultures had the rule that individuals should marry their cross-cousin, meaning children of siblings of the opposite sex - from a male perspective that is either the FZD (father's sister's daughter) or the MBD (mother's brother's daughter). Accordingly, he grouped all possible kinship systems into a scheme containing three basic kinship structures constructed out of two types of exchange. He called the three kinship structures elementary, semi-complex and complex.
Levi-Strauss also discovered that a wide range of historically unrelated cultures had the rule that individuals should marry their cross-cousin, meaning children of siblings of the opposite sex - from a male perspective that is either the FZD (father's sister's daughter in kinship abbreviation) or the MBD (mother's brother's daughter in kinship abbreviation). Accordingly, he grouped all possible kinship systems into a scheme containing three basic kinship structures, constructed out of two types of exchange. He called the three kinship structures elementary, semi-complex and complex.
Elementary structures are based on positive marriage rules that specify whom a person must marry, while complex systems specify negative marriage rules (whom one must not marry), thus leaving a certain amount of room for choice based on preference. Elementary structures can operate based on two forms of exchange: restricted (or direct) exchange, a symmetric form of exchange between two groups (also called moieties) of wife-givers and wife-takers; in an initial restricted exchange FZ marries MB, with all children then being bilateral cross-cousins (the daughter is both MBD and FZD). Continued restricted exchange means that the two lineages marry together. Restricted exchange structures are generally quite uncommon.
Elementary structures are based on positive marriage rules that specify whom a person must marry, while complex systems specify negative marriage rules (whom one must not marry), thus leaving room for choice based on preference. Elementary structures can operate based on two forms of exchange: restricted (or direct) exchange, a symmetric form of exchange between two groups (also called moieties) of wife-givers and wife-takers; in an initial restricted exchange FZ marries MB, with all children then being bilateral cross-cousins (the daughter is both MBD and FZD). Continued restricted exchange means that the two lineages marry together. Restricted exchange structures are generally quite uncommon.
It has been found that the overexpression of B-catenin may lead to enhanced proliferation in myeloma plasma cells; thus, soluble Wnt inhibitors are potential tumor suppressor genes and, if inactivated, may contribute to myeloma pathogenesis. This led Chim et al. to investigate the role of aberrant gene methylation of a panel of soluble Wnt antagonists, including SFRP1. Complete methylation led to silencing of respective genes (no transcripts), whereas absence of gene methylation was associated with constitutive gene expression. Methylation of soluble Wnt antagonists would be important in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma if Wnt signaling was regulated by an autocrine loop by Wnt and Fz. If an autocrine loops exists, then both the ligand (Wz) and receptor (Fzd) should be simultaneously expressed in myeloma cells and growth of tumour cells should be inhibited upon addition of SFRP1. Chim et al. demonstrated simultaneous expression of Wz and Fzd in myeloma plasma cells. Moreover, treatment with recombinant SFRP1 inhibited the growth of myeloma cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings implicate soluble Wnt inhibitors as tumor suppressors that could be inactivated by methylation.
The setting up of trusts and offshore companies is quite common in Malta especially when one considers that the economy depends on financial services. 714 Maltese companies were listed on the Panama papers and included names such as Louis Farrugia of Farsons, who is also Chairman of the Strickland Foundation, which owns Allies Newspapers, the publisher of the Times, former PN Minister Ninu Zammit among many others. Maltese financial services companies were also included in Panama papers, as they provide financial services to non-Maltese nationals in particular FZD Trustee and Fiduciary Services, whose CEO was a former PN Minister Francis Zammit Dimech and EMD, which is linked to Richard Cachia Caruana, Malta's former Permanent Representative to the European Union under the previous administration.
The second form of exchange within elementary structures is called generalised exchange, meaning that a man can only marry either his MBD (matrilateral cross-cousin marriage) or his FZD (patrilateral cross-cousin marriage). This involves an asymmetric exchange between at least three groups. Matrilateral cross-cousin marriage arrangements where the marriage of the parents is repeated by successive generations are very common in parts of Asia (e.g. amongst the Kachin). Levi-Strauss considered generalised exchange to be superior to restricted exchange because it allows the integration of indefinite numbers of groups. Examples of restricted exchange are found in some tribes residing in the Amazon basin. These tribal societies are made up of multiple moieties which often split up, thus rendering them comparatively unstable. Generalised exchange is more integrative but contains an implicit hierarchy, for instance amongst the Kachin where wife-givers are superior to wife-takers. Consequently, the last wife-taking group in the chain is significantly inferior to the first wife-giving group to which it is supposed to give its wives. These status inequalities can destabilise the entire system or can at least lead to an accumulation of wives (and in the case of the Kachin also of bridewealth) at one end of the chain.
The second form of exchange within elementary structures is called generalised exchange, meaning that a man can only marry either his MBD (matrilateral cross-cousin marriage) or his FZD (patrilateral cross-cousin marriage). This involves an asymmetric exchange between at least three groups. Matrilateral cross-cousin marriage arrangements where the marriage of the parents is repeated by successive generations are very common in parts of Asia (e.g. amongst the Kachin). Lévi-Strauss considered generalised exchange to be superior to restricted exchange because it allows the integration of indefinite numbers of groups. Examples of restricted exchange are found, for instance, in the Amazon basin. These tribal societies are made up of multiple moieties that often split up, rendering them comparatively unstable. Generalised exchange is more integrative but contains an implicit hierarchy, as e.g. amongst the Kachin where wife-givers are superior to wife-takers. Consequently, the last wife-taking group in the chain is significantly inferior to the first wife-giving group to which it is supposed to give its wives. These status inequalities can destabilise the entire system or can at least lead to an accumulation of wives (and in the case of the Kachin, also of bridewealth) at one end of the chain.