Synonyms for gebrüder_bethmann or Related words with gebrüder_bethmann

bayerische_vereinsbank              meespierson              landesbank_hessen_thüringen              finansbanken              consorsbank              guyerzeller              österreich_ag              deutsche_börse_ag              saarlb              landmandsbanken              deltacredit              jacob_safra              nibc              helaba              asphales              bayerische_hypo_und_vereinsbank              commerzbank_ag              investment_banking_brokerage              adequately_capitalized              almanij              bakkavor              fxdirekt              reggenmbh              bayerische_landesbank              sasfin              landesbank_baden_württemberg              financials_diversified              wisselbank              vontobel              bayerische_hypotheken              accessholding              westlb              deutsche_postbank              und_wechselbank              rentenbank              varengold              rotterdamsche_bank              cashpool              expobank              hottinger_cie              ing_barings              numbrs              mats_qviberg              kentbank              schoellerbank              la_banque_postale              deustche              stavebná              cofra              aachenmünchener             



Examples of "gebrüder_bethmann"
The establishment of the Bethmann bank in Frankfurt am Main is dated to 1748, the year when Johann Philipp Bethmann (1715-1793), who had inherited the trading enterprise of his uncle "Jakob Adami" in 1746, officially took his brother Simon Moritz as a partner. From that point the enterprise was called Gebrüder Bethmann.
Following the death of their uncle in 1745 the brothers inherited half of his fortune. In 1746 they assumed control of the trading enterprise "Jacob Adami", which became the "Gebrüder Bethmann" bank in 1748. In 1762 they purchased the "Basler Hof" mansion and premises from the Patrizier "Johann Friedrich Maximilian von Stalburg", which Johann Philipp expanded with further acquisitions in 1787/88.
Like snapshots, two quotes from Egon Caesar Conte Corti highlight the great strides made by the Rothschilds in a very short timespan. The first is a glimpse at the beginnings of the Rothschilds' rise. The year is 1794, but as yet "Gebrüder Bethmann" are too powerful for the upstart to break into the game.
"Simon Moritz" Henning August Freiherr von Bethmann (1887–1966): Following studies of the law in Lausanne and Leipzig, he joined Gebrüder Bethmann as partner in 1913. In 1914 he married Maximiliane Countess Schimmelpenninck, a granddaughter of Dr. Eugen Lucius, a founder of Hoechst AG, thus adding the landed estate of Gut Schönstadt near Marburg to the Bethmann holdings. He joined the board of the stock exchange and became its president in 1933.
Johann Jakob was born in Bergnassau, one of three sons of the administrator "Simon Moritz Bethmann" (1687–1725). After the premature death of their father, the brothers were raised by their maternal uncle "Jakob Adami" in Frankfurt am Main. While the brothers Johann Philipp and Simon Moritz established the "Gebrüder Bethmann" bank based on their uncle's inheritance, Johann Jakob moved to Bordeaux in 1740, where he established "Bethmann & Imbert" (since 1779 "Bethmann & fils") as a trading enterprise and shipowning company.
The oldest son of Simon Moritz von Bethmann (1768-1826) and "Louise Friederike née Boode" was only 15 years old when his father died. In 1833 he became the head of the "Gebrüder Bethmann" bank. Von Bethmann focused especially on railway construction. Together with the House of Rothschild, he established three railroad companies in succession: Taunus-Eisenbahn AG in 1836, Frankfurt-Hanauer Eisenbahn in 1844, and the Friedrich-Wilhelms-Nordbahn. In the 1850s he also invested in (among others) the Italian central railroad company, the Austrian state-controlled railroad company, and the Rhein-Nahe-Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft.
For the Grand Duchy, emancipation meant that it would lose the annual protection money from the Jews, which it could ill afford. Therefore a "tax commutation payment" was determined, and the Jews of Frankfurt had to purchase their freedom with 440,000 gulden. The Israelitic Community nominated a committee of five men to handle the matter, one of them being Mayer Amschel. In addition Rothschild procured the cash amounts that the Community was unable to raise through the discounting of bills of exchange, including the second installment in the form of debentures with a term of ten years, a major tranche of which was handled by the "Gebrüder Bethmann" bank.
Upon the death of Simon Moritz in 1725, his widow Elisabeth Bethmann, formerly Thielen (1680–1757) returned to Frankfurt, where she became housekeeper in the household of her brother-in-law, the merchant Jakob Adami (1670–1745). In his will, he bequeathed to his nephews half of his fortune. Johann Philipp and Simon Moritz took control of the "Jacob Adami" trading enterprise, out of which in 1748 the banking enterprise of "Gebrüder Bethmann" developed. This eventually became the House of Bethmann. Johann Jakob – the middle brother – established a trading branch in Bordeaux. Later he became the imperial consul in Bordeaux and founded the Bordeaux branch of the family, which continues to this day.
The "Frankfurt-Hanau Railway Company" (, FHE) was founded at the initiative of the Prussian consul general to the Free City of Frankfurt, Moritz von Bethmann and with the financial support of the Gebrüder Bethmann bank of Frankfurt and the Bernus du Fay bank of Hanau. On 12 April 1843, the company received a preliminary construction permit from the Electorate of Hesse ("Kurhessen"), which was converted into a concession in 1844. The concession allowed for the compulsory purchase of the land required. Most of the line ran over the territory of the Electorate of Hesse, only the western section and the Frankfurt terminus, called "Hanauer Bahnhof" (Hanau Station) were located on the territory of the Free City of Frankfurt. Both the Electorate of Hesse and the Free City of Frankfurt were then independent states, separated by a customs boundary.
A consortium to build the railway was established in 1835 under the leadership of the two Frankfurt banks Gebrüder Bethmann and Rothschild. The shares that it issued were immediately oversubscribed 40 times, enabling work to begin in 1837. Nevertheless, the final concession was not approved until 1838: by the City of Frankfurt on 8 May, by the Grand Duchy of Hessen on 11 May and by Nassau on 13 June. The private Taunus Railway Company ("Taunus-Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft") was established on 12 August 1838 in Frankfurt/Main. Paul Camille von Denis, a Bavarian, born in Mainz, who had worked on the first German railway, the Bavarian Ludwigsbahn between Nuremberg and Fürth (opened in 1835), designed the route.
Within a short span of time, the Bethmann bank developed into one of Frankfurt's leading Christian-owned banks, on a scale comparable only to its younger rival, the House of Rothschild. The bank's fortunes began to rise in 1754 based on its business in imperial, princely and municipal bonds and skyrocketed from 1778, thanks to the bank's innovation in breaking the amount borrowed by the Austrian emperor down into "sub-bonds" ("Partialobligationen") at 1000 guldens each offered to the public, which made them tradeable in secondary markets. This transformed the bank from a lender to an underwriter of bond issues. At one point, the profits of "Gebrüder Bethmann" exceeded those of all its Frankfurt competitors put together, and it ranked first among all German banks.
Ludwig "Simon Moritz" Freiherr von Bethmann (1844–1902), the eldest son of Moritz von Bethmann and Marie von Bose, married Baroness Helene von Wendland. Trained in London, he joined "Gebrüder Bethmann" as partner in 1869. He gained broad experience in several industries serving as non-executive director on the boards of rail and banking companies. This "Simon Moritz" kept up the railroad business but also got the bank involved in municipal bonds and industrial investments worldwide. A passionate huntsman and athlete, he became a wheelchair user following a riding accident in 1879. He gave generously to local and charitable causes, sponsoring the Golden Book of Frankfurt am Main in 1902. Of their three children only "Simon Moritz" survived. After serving as First Lieutenant in World War I, he set out to transform the Bethmann bank into a full-service bank.
Within a short span of time, the Bethmann bank developed into one of Frankfurt's leading (Christian-owned) banks, on a scale comparable only to its younger rival, the House of Rothschild. The bank's fortunes began to rise in 1754 based on its business in imperial, princely and municipal bonds and skyrocketed from 1778, thanks to the bank's innovation of breaking the Austrian emperor's borrowing down into "sub-bonds" ("Partialobligationen") at 1000 gulden each offered to the public, which made them tradeable in secondary markets. This transformed the bank from a lender to an underwriter of bond issues. At one point, the profits of "Gebrüder Bethmann" exceeded those of all its Frankfurt competitors together, and it ranked first among all German banks.