Synonyms for giacopo or Related words with giacopo

piovene              trenzano              induno              suardi              capizucchi              nevano              monchiero              caravino              fermignano              ulderico              pontestura              feltria              tromello              landolfo              giacobazzi              montereale              dionigi              frascaro              irpina              lavello              artegna              solonghello              eubea              tarchi              niccola              padovano              malvezzi              capannoli              acciaiuoli              pezzana              caresana              seripando              sannita              seniore              neviano              tricerro              greci              ostiano              cervasca              alderano              frascineto              poirino              barlassina              locatello              cossano              buronzo              olginate              castellazzo              lurago              casasco             



Examples of "giacopo"
Giacopo Antonio Venier was born in Recanati in 1422.
Giacopo Belgrado, (November 16, 1704 in Udine – March 26, 1789 in Udine) Italian Jesuit and natural philosopher.
Giacopo Antonio Venier (1422–1479) (called the Cardinal of Cuenca) was an Italian Roman Catholic bishop and cardinal.
Mazzoni, Giacopo. "On the Defense of the Comedy of Dante: Introduction and summary". Trans. Robert L. Montgomery. Tallahassee: University Presses of Florida, 1983.
Leitch, Vincent B. Ed. "Giacopo Mazzoni." "The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism." New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 2001. 299-302.
Giacopo (Jacopo) Mazzoni was born in Cesena, Italy in 1548. Educated in Bologna in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Rhetoric, and Poetics, Mazzoni later attended the University of Padua in 1563 where he studied Philosophy and Jurisprudence.
With the patronage of Count Raimondo Magnoni, he set up a studio and among his pupils were Giovanni Andrea Mones, Antonio Zanetti, Francesco Ferrari, Giovanni Battista Pellizzari, Giacopo Mosca, Pietro Guazzi, and Paolo Araldi.
Oehme was born in Wiesbaden, Germany as the son of Dr. Reinhold Oehme and Katharina Kraus. In 1952, in São Paulo, Brazil, he married Mafalda Pisani, who was born in Berlin as the daughter of Giacopo Pisani and Wanda d'Alfonso. Mafalda died in Chicago in August of the year 2004.
Giacopo belonged to a noble family and received his education at Padua. He entered the novitiate of the Society of Jesus 16 October 1723, and showed marked talent, studying mathematics and philosophy at Bologna, under Father Luigi Marchenti, a former pupil of Pierre Varignon at Paris. After completing his philosophical studies he taught letters for several years at Venice.
Giacomo Bresadola (Mezzana, Trento; often given as Giacopo) 14 February 1847 – Trento 9 June 1929) was an eminent Italian mycologist. Fungi he named include the deadly "Lepiota helveola" and "Inocybe patouillardii", though the latter is now known as "Inocybe erubescens" as this latter description predated Bresadola's by a year. He was a founding member of the "Société mycologique de France" (Mycology Society of France).
Only fourteen compositions have been securely attributed to Sebastiano Festa: four motets and ten madrigals. Another seven madrigals are considered doubtful. Similarities in style between Sebastiano's and Costanzo's work have made some of the identification difficult. All of his works are for four voices, and most of the madrigals he published in a single volume in 1526 in Rome, "Libro primo de la croce: canzoni, frottole et capitoli", by printers Pasoti and Dorico at the publishing house of Giacopo Giunta.
Before the Monte di Pietà actually operated, a group of "eight men assembled to draw up the statues" of the Florentine monte di pietà on April 15, 1496. The eight who gathered were Niccolò de’ Nobili, Piero de’ Lenzi, Bernardo de’ Segni, Niccolò de’ Nero, Piero de’ Guicciardini, Giacopo de’ Salviati, Antonio di Sasso di Sasso and Diacopo Mannucci. It was the members of the patrician class that dominated the prestigious and well paid positions of decision making concerning the Monte di Pietà.
Silviatti is a proper Italian surname, originating in the Arno Valley region of Tuscany. The first references to the Silviatti family are in a 1225 census report taken by the town fathers of Sesto di Firenze. They are listed as 'bankers' or 'money-changers' depending upon interpretation of the dialect. Prominent members of the family include Giacopo Silviatti, a majordomo in the house of Lorenzo de' Medici, and Gianfranco Silviatti, an acting mayor of Sesto di Firenze in the 16th century.
On an unknown date, Marguerite married her first husband, Pierre de Baux, and following his death, she married as her second husband, a relative of her mother, Giacopo of Sanseverino. Both of these early marriages were childless. In 1380, after Giacopo's death, Marguerite married her third husband, John of Luxembourg, Sire of Beauvois (1370–1397). He was the son of Guy of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol and Mahaut of Châtillon, Countess of Saint-Pol. By her third husband, Marguerite had five children:
Twelve cardinals attended the funeral, according to the Apostolic Subdeacon, Giacopo Caetani Stefaneschi, who was present at the events. There were six Romans, four Italians, and two French. They were divided into two opposing groups, one led by Matteo Rosso Orsini, which sought a new pope who would be compliant to the wishes of King Charles II of Sicily, the other by Giacopo Colonna. Cardinal Latino, as "Ordine Pontificum primus" (in the words of Giacopo Caetani Stefaneschi), undertook the expected task of summoning the Conclave. According to the rules, it would have opened on August 15 or 16, 1292, at S. Maria Maggiore, where Nicholas IV had died. But his efforts were unsuccessful. Some did assemble at S. Maria Maggiore, but the rest held back. Then he tried to assemble everyone at the papal palace at Santa Sabina, and then at Santa Maria sopra Minerva. The reason for his failure is not far to seek. There was a civil war going on in the streets and neighborhoods of Rome between the Orsini family and their adherents and the Colonna family and theirs. Each faction of the cardinals was unwilling to entrust its safety to the other faction, or to anyone else. There was also the heat and oppressive humidity of a Roman summer to contend with, and that always brought plague of some sort, especially malaria. Instead of coming together, the Cardinals began to disperse. Claiming illness, Cardinal Benedetto Caetani withdrew to his home town of Anagni, in the hills east of Rome. Cardinal Hugues de Billon and three other cardinals retreated to Reate in Tuscany, north of Rome. It was only in September, 1292, after the summer heat had dissipated, that Caetani, Matthew of Acquasparta, and Bianchi returned to the city. But still there was no conclave. It was time to elect new Senators for Rome for the year 1293, but civil disorders made an election impossible.
The palace was remodelled in the Renaissance style in the 16th century. The plan was prepared by several Italian architects, including Giovanni Cini da Siena, Bernardino de Gianotis Zanobi, and others. The palace was visited by Ippolito Aldobrandini, who later became Pope Clement VIII. Another major development took place during the reign of the House of Vasa. The palace was refurbished in the early Baroque style during the rule of Sigismund III Vasa. Matteo Castello, Giacopo Tencalla, and other artists participated in the 17th-century renovation.
Pope Nicholas IV died in Rome at his residence at Santa Maria Maggiore on Holy Saturday, April 4, 1292. At the time of his death, there were twelve living cardinals, according to the Subdeacon of the Holy Roman Church, Giacopo Caetani Stefaneschi, who was present at the events. One of them was Cardinal Jean Cholet. The Conclave, however, lasted for two years and three months, during which Cardinal Cholet died. Only eleven cardinals signed the electoral decree of Pope Celestine V on Monday, 5 July 1294.
The palace was remodeled in the Renaissance style in the 16th century. The plan was prepared by several Italian architects, including Giovanni Cini da Siena, Bernardino de Gianotis Zanobi, and others. The palace was visited by Ippolito Aldobrandini, who later became Pope Clement VIII. Another major development took place during the reign of the Vasa family. The Royal Palace was refurbished in early Baroque style during the rule of Sigismund III Vasa. Matteo Castello, Giacopo Tencalla, and other artists participated in the 17th-century renovation.
He wrote a biography of the Venetian painters in 1648 titled "Le maraviglie dell’ Arte ovvero, Le vite degli Illustri Pittori Veneti and dello Stato". He also wrote "La vita di Giacopo Robusti" (The Biography of Tintoretto) in 1642. He was awarded the knighthood of the Golden Cross by Pope Innocent X and a chain of gold and a medal of St. Mark by the Republic of Venice, essentially for his books rather than his painting. Subsequent Venetian chroniclers who have quoted Ridolfi include Marco Boschini, Antonio Maria Zanetti, and Luigi Lanzi.
On 29 Jan 1469, Alfonso de Fonseca was appointed by the King of Spain and confirmed by Pope Paul II as Bishop of Ávila. On 25 Feb 1470, he was ordained bishop by Giacopo Antonio Venier, Bishop of Cuenca; Giovanni Gianderoni, Bishop of Città di Castello; and Corrado Marcellini, Bishop of Montefeltro. On 26 Aug 1485, he was appointed by Pope Innocent VIII as Bishop of Cuenca. On 24 May 1493, he was appointed by Pope Alexander VI as Bishop of Osma where he served until his death in 1505.