Synonyms for giovanni_spadolini or Related words with giovanni_spadolini

ugo_la_malfa              giuliano_amato              arnaldo_forlani              enrico_letta              amintore_fanfani              pietro_nenni              mariano_rumor              giovanni_leone              giuseppe_saragat              massimo_alema              giulio_andreotti              paolo_gentiloni              oronzo_reale              bettino_craxi              lamberto_dini              ferruccio_parri              valerio_zanone              matteo_renzi              francesco_cossiga              maurizio_sacconi              fabrizio_cicchitto              renato_brunetta              francesco_rutelli              francesco_speroni              antonio_segni              ivanoe_bonomi              emma_bonino              roberto_formigoni              mario_monti              benedetto_della_vedova              giovanni_malagodi              giulio_tremonti              giancarlo_galan              giovanni_goria              enrico_berlinguer              la_malfa              filippo_turati              vito_gnutti              benigno_zaccagnini              roberto_maroni              willer_bordon              sandro_pertini              marco_pannella              matteo_salvini              flaminio_piccoli              antonio_salandra              giorgio_amendola              fanfani              alfredo_biondi              roberto_cota             



Examples of "giovanni_spadolini"
Giovanni Spadolini (21 June 1925 – 4 August 1994) was a Republican Italian politician, the 44th Prime Minister of Italy, newspaper editor, journalist and a historian.
The 7th G7 summit was the first summit for French President François Mitterrand, Italian Prime Minister Giovanni Spadolini, Japanese Prime Minister Zenko Suzuki and U.S. President Ronald Reagan.
Giovanni Spadolini served as Ministro dei Beni e delle Attività culturali (Minister for Cultural Assets and Activities) from 1974 to 1976.
The 8th G7 summit was the last summit for German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, Italian Prime Minister Giovanni Spadolini and Japanese Prime Minister Zenko Suzuki.
In the 1980s, for the first time since 1945, two governments were led by non-Christian Democrat Premiers: a Republican (Giovanni Spadolini) and a Socialist (Bettino Craxi); the DC remained however the main force supporting the government.
In the 1980s, for the first time since 1945, two governments were led by non-Christian Democrat Premiers: the republican Giovanni Spadolini and the socialist Bettino Craxi; the Christian Democracy remained however the main force supporting the government.
In Italy, after a new president is elected, the government resigns. The PCI expected Pertini to use his influence in their favour. But the President was influenced by other political leaders like Giovanni Spadolini of the Italian Republican Party and Bettino Craxi of the Italian Socialist Party, and the PCI remained out of the government.
The government of Ciriaco De Mita did not survive to this vote: declining Italian Republican Party fired its leader Giovanni Spadolini, and the new secretary Giorgio La Malfa retired his support to the old PM. The Christian Democracy so chose a very expert new PM: Giulio Andreotti.
The vote of the Senators for life was not decisive, as three (Gianni Agnelli, Francesco Cossiga and Giovanni Leone) voted in favour of the government, three were absent (Carlo Bo, Norberto Bobbio and Amintore Fanfani) and five voted against (Giulio Andreotti, Francesco De Martino, Giovanni Spadolini and Paolo Emilio Taviani and Leo Valiani).
The immediate consequence of the kidnapping was the exclusion of PCI from any government cabinet in the following years. Although increasingly weakened, DC remained the main government party until 1994 (although in 1981, for the first time since the formation of the Italian Republic Giovanni Spadolini, a non-Christian Democrat, became premier in a DC-based alliance).
"La Nazione" merged with Cavour's famous political newspaper, "Il_Risorgimento_(newspaper)". Based in Florence, Italy, it is published in fourteen editions including those for the regions of Tuscany, Umbria and for the Province of La Spezia in Liguria. The early contributors include Edmondo de Amicis, Carlo Lorenzini, Giovanni Spadolini, Giuseppe Prezzolini and Mario Luzi.
Altissimo was also Health Minister in the governments of Francesco Cossiga (1979–1980) I, Giovanni Spadolini I and II (1980–1981), and Amintore Fanfani (1982–1983) V. He served as Minister for Industry and Trade with Bettino Craxi (first Government 1983 - 1986).
He was Treasury Secretary from October 1980 to December 1982 in the government of Arnaldo Forlani and the two governments of Giovanni Spadolini. In July 1982 a quarrel with the socialist Minister of Finance Rino Formica brought down the Spadolini government. He did not participate in the following governments of Bettino Craxi and Giulio Andreotti, especially since he was skeptical of the economic policies that these adopted.
The Italian novelist Dino Buzzati was a journalist at the "Corriere della Sera". Other notable contributors include Eugenio Montale, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Enzo Bettiza, Italo Calvino, Alberto Moravia, Amos Oz, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Guido Piovene, Giovanni Spadolini, Oriana Fallaci, Alessandra Farkas, Lando Ferretti, Brunella Gasperini, Enzo Biagi, Indro Montanelli, Paolo Brera, Francesco Alberoni, Tracy Chevalier, Goffredo Parise, Sergio Romano, Sandro Paternostro, Alan Friedman, Tommaso Landolfi and Paolo Mieli.
In the 1980s, for the first time since 1945, two governments were led by non-Christian-Democrat premiers: one liberal (Giovanni Spadolini) and one socialist (Bettino Craxi); the Christian Democrats remained, however, the main government party. During Craxi's government, the economy recovered and Italy became the world's fifth largest industrial nation, gaining entry into the G7 Group. However, as a result of his spending policies, the Italian national debt skyrocketed during the Craxi era, soon passing 100% of the GDP.
In the 1980s, for the first time since 1945, two governments were led by non-Christian-Democrat premiers: one republican (Giovanni Spadolini) and one socialist (Bettino Craxi); the Christian Democrats remained, however, the main government party. During Craxi's government, the economy recovered and Italy became the world's fifth largest industrial nation, gaining entry into the G7 Group. However, as a result of his spending policies, the Italian national debt skyrocketed during the Craxi era, soon passing 100% of the GDP.
Princess Margaret visited the Institute in 1972, on the occasion of the Henry Moore exhibition at Forte Belevedere in Florence. Helen, former Queen of Romania, attended lectures and concerts in the 1970s. The Prince and Princess of Wales visited the School and Library in 1985, after Prince Charles had agreed to become the Institute’s Patron (together with the statesman Giovanni Spadolini). Prince Charles returned in 2002. His Co-Patron is now Signora Wanda Ferragamo. Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge (then Kate Middleton) spent part of her gap year in 2000 here.
In 1981 Giovanni Spadolini of the PRI was the first non-Christian Democrat to lead a government since 1944, at the head of a coalition comprising the DC, the PSI, the PSDI, the PRI and the PLI, the so-called "Pentapartito". In the successive 1983 general election DC suffered one of its largest declines in terms of votes at that point, receiving only 32.5% of the vote cast (-5.8%). Subsequently, Bettino Craxi (leader of the rising PSI) reclaimed for himself the post of Prime Minister, again at the head of a "Pentapartito" government.
Italy faced political instability in the 1970s, which ended in the 1980s. Known as the Years of Lead, this period was characterized by widespread social conflicts and terrorist acts carried out by extra-parliamentary movements. The assassination of the leader of the Christian Democracy (DC), Aldo Moro, led to the end of a "historic compromise" between the DC and the Communist Party (PCI). In the 1980s, for the first time, two governments were managed by a republican (Giovanni Spadolini 1981–82) and a socialist (Bettino Craxi 1983–87) rather than by a Christian-democrat.
Italy faced political instability in the 1970s, which ended in the 1980s. Known as the Years of Lead, this period was characterized by widespread social conflicts and terrorist acts carried out by extra-parliamentary movements. The assassination of the leader of the Christian Democracy (DC), Aldo Moro, led to the end of a "historic compromise" between the DC and the Communist Party (PCI). In the 1980s, for the first time, two governments were managed by a republican (Giovanni Spadolini) and a socialist (Bettino Craxi) rather than by a member of DC.