Synonyms for gokoro or Related words with gokoro

soshite              utsukushii              hitotsu              omoi              chiisana              ikenai              yasashii              tameni              zutto              mukashi              sakana              mizuiro              usotsuki              itsuka              utae              tsumetai              shiranai              hitori              hoshii              omoide              taiyou              kanashii              gakari              yakusoku              yureru              moeru              kimochi              inochi              yatte              daremo              kamisama              kanashiki              wasurenai              renai              meguru              amai              nemuru              itsumademo              ningyo              tsumi              ikite              mienai              yumemiru              koibito              kotoba              hyaku              motsu              oishii              hitsuji              yoku             



Examples of "gokoro"
Tracks 2 and 3 on the DVD were recorded live at Hello! Project's "2007 Winter Wonderful Hearts Otome Gokoro" concert.
"Yamato-gokoro" (大和心 "Japanese heart; Japanese mind" is the closest synonym of "Yamato-damashii". The Heian poet Akazome Emon first used "Yamato-gokoro" in her "Goshūi Wakashū" (後拾遺和歌集 "Later Collection of Waka Gleanings," 1086).
MAY is about to set off a tour in 2007 after releasing her sixth single "Onna Gokoro" on 4 April 2007.
Most Japanese-English dictionaries literally translate "Yamato-damashii" as "the Japanese spirit". For instance, Kenkyūsha's New Japanese-English Dictionary (5th ed., 2003) enters "Yamato" "やまと【大和】 Yamato; (old) Japan" along with 14 subentries, including "Yamato-damashii" "大和魂 the Japanese spirit" and "Yamato-gokoro" "大和心 the Japanese spirit; the Japanese sensibility."
The names of four sub-units within the "Kamikaze" Special Attack Force were "Unit Shikishima", "Unit Yamato", "Unit Asahi", and "Unit Yamazakura". These names were taken from a patriotic death poem, "Shikishima no Yamato-gokoro wo hito towaba, asahi ni niou yamazakura bana" by the Japanese classical scholar, Motoori Norinaga. The poem reads:
For this national type of moral character was invented the name "Yamato-damashi" (or "Yamato-gokoro"), — the Soul of Yamato (or Heart of Yamato), — the appellation of the old province of Yamato, seat of the early emperors, being figuratively used for the entire country. We might correctly, though less literally, interpret the expression "Yamato-damashi" as "The Soul of Old Japan". (1904:177)
In 2004 he appeared dressed up as an insect in a commercial and sang "Mushi Gokoro". In 2005, he also appeared in another commercial and sang "Odekake Bojō". In 2007, he performed "Onna no Michi" in the 5th story of movie "Kayōkyoku dayo Jinsei wa".
Kawashima started her career as an enka singer. At around the age of 10, she performed on stage at the Carnegie Hall in New York. In 1999, she released her debut single, "Juu-roku Koi Gokoro / Anata ni Kataomoi". However, the enka project was crippled by poor sales and was abandoned entirely within a few months.
On May 20, 2009, Takahashi released the cover album of Japanese male singers, "No Reason: Otoko Gokoro", in which she covered Kyu Sakamoto's "Miagete Goran Yoru no Hoshi o" and Yūzō Kayama's "Kimi to Itsumademo." The album debuted at #7 on the Japanese Oricon album charts.
Kitasan Black is from the third crop of foals sired by Black Tide, who was a full-brother to Deep Impact. Black Tide was a high-class performer in his own right, winning the Spring Stakes in 2004 before his career was severely disrupted by an injury sustained in the Satsuki Sho. His dam Sugar Heart was an unraced daughter of the Japanese Champion Sprinter Sakura Bakushin O. Her dam Otome Gokoro was a half-sister to Cee's Tizzy, the sire of Tiznow.
Vice Admiral Takijirō Ōnishi addressed the first kamikaze (suicide attack) unit, telling them that their nobility of spirit would keep the homeland from ruin even in defeat. The names of four sub-units within the "Kamikaze" Special Attack Force were "Unit Shikishima", "Unit Yamato", "Unit Asahi", and "Unit Yamazakura". These names were taken from a patriotic poem (waka or tanka), "Shikishima no Yamato-gokoro wo hito towaba, asahi ni niou yamazakura bana" by the Japanese classical scholar, Motoori Norinaga.
The album features two solos: "Ai no Honō", performed by Reina Tanaka, and "Denwa de ne", performed by Ai Takahashi. While these are the only solos, other members are allocated main vocals on some songs: Sayumi Michishige on "Fantasy ga Hajimaru", Risa Niigaki on "Onna Gokoro to Nan to Yara", and Eri Kamei on "Itoshiku Kurushii Kono Yoru ni". Similarly to the group's previous album, "10 My Me", the eighth generation, Aika Mitsui, Junjun and Linlin are heavily featured on the same track: track 7, "Sungoi My Birthday".
yamato ... -damashii, "-damashiFi" "type 4" [accent on "da"] 【《大和》魂】1. "yamato-gokoro". "wakon". (in contrast to knowledge obtained from studying Chinese classics) Japanese people's characteristic ability or wisdom/intelligence for managing/treating actual things and worldly affairs. "The Tale of Genji" (The Maiden [chapter]) "Without a solid foundation of book-learning this 'Japanese spirit' of which one hears so much is not of any great use in the world." [Tales of] Times Now Past (20) "He did not have the slightest knowledge of the Japanese spirit." 2. (term used in ultra-nationalistic ideology of recent times) characteristic mentality of the Japanese race/people. Consciousness/awareness of being a Japanese person. (tr. Carr 1994:288)
The wildlife of Cameroon is composed of its flora and fauna. Bordering Nigeria, it is considered one of the wettest parts of Africa and records Africa's second highest concentration of biodiversity. To preserve its wildlife, Cameroon has more than 20 protected reserves comprising national parks, zoos, forest reserves and sanctuaries. The protected areas were first created in the northern region under the colonial administration in 1932; the first two reserves established were Mozogo Gokoro Reserve and the Bénoué Reserve, which was followed by the Waza Reserve on 24 March 1934. The coverage of reserves was initially about 4 percent of the country's area, rising to 12 percent; the administration proposes to cover 30 percent of the land area.
Miwa has written many books as well, and is known for his outspoken highly critical comments about the government, social issues and war. He was in Nagasaki when the atomic bomb was dropped in 1945, but escaped relatively unhurt. He is against the 2015 Japanese military legislation and Prime Minister Abe's regime, says that "Prime Minister Abe and those who voted for the LDP should go to the front as Japanese soldiers firstly." and criticizes Japanese militarism in the Second World War because of the experience in his childhood, however he insists that Japanese spiritual and cultural values and characteristics of the Japanese people with the origin of "Kojiki" and "Nihon Shoki", like Bushido (the Samurai way of life) and Yamato-gokoro (means the "Heart of Great Harmony" in Japanese) which were destroyed by the WWII should be restored in post-war Japan.
The whole territory of the Far North Province was once home to most of Africa's iconic species: antelope, chacals, cheetahs, crocodiles, elephants, giraffes, heron, hippopotami, hyenas, leopards, lions, monkeys, warthogs, and others. Centuries of human habitation have today forced these species back to a few protected areas and national parks. Foremost among these is Waza National Park ("Parc National du Waza"), which occupies 1700 km. The park was created in 1968, and has since grown to be one of Cameroon's largest tourist attractions. Kalamaloué National Park ("Parc National de Kalamaloué") is a smaller protected area, which protects 45 km in the narrow neck of land separating Nigeria and Chad at the province's northernmost reaches. This park protects those species that routinely traverse Cameroon in their yearly migrations. Mozogo Gokoro National Park houses a diverse number of monkey and reptile species within 14 km².
Cameroon's first protected area in the northern part of the country was established in 1932 under the French colonial administration of the black francophone Africa. The first forest reserve created was the Mozogo Gokoro Reserve on 12 June 1932 and the second in the same year was the Benue Reserve on 19 November 1932. The third reserve, the Waza Reserve was established on 24 March 1934, initially covering an area of which was extended in 1935 to cover ; this is one of the most popular reserves in the country. Until 1975, there were 9 protected areas with greater focus on the north than the south. Following the Earth Summit of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil in 1992, the number of protected areas increased substantially and were well distributed covering all the ten provinces of the country in widely differing topographic, climatic, hydrological and biological conditions. There are 20 protected reserves which include national parks, zoos, forest reserves and sanctuaries.
Cameroon's first protected area in the northern part of the country was established in 1932 under the French colonial administration of the black francophone Africa. The first forest reserve created was the Mozogo Gokoro Reserve 12 June 1932 and the second in the same year was the Benue Reserve on 19 November 1932. The third reserve, the Waza Reserve was established on 24 March 1934, initially covering an area of which was extended in 1935 to cover ; this is one of the most popular reserves in the country. Until 1975, there were 9 protected areas with greater focus on the north than the south. Following the Earth Summit of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil in 1992, the number of protected areas increased substantially and were well distributed covering all the ten provinces of the country in widely differing topographic, climatic, hydrological and biological conditions. There are 20 protected reserves which include national parks, zoos, forest reserves and sanctuaries.
Literally, "Japanese spirit"; "Yamato damashii" is also written 大和魂. This term is often contrasted with "Chinese Learning" ("karasae"), that is, knowledge and scholarship imported into Japan from China. "Yamato damashii" refers to an inherent faculty of common-sense wisdom, resourcefulness, and prudent judgment that is characteristic of, and unique to, the Japanese people. It also refers to a practical, "real life" ability and intelligence that is in contrast with scholarship and knowledge acquired through formal education. It is a term used to express such ideas as the essential purity and resolute spirit of the Japanese people, the wish for the peace and security of the nation, and the possession of a strong spirit and emotion that will meet any challenge, even at the expense of one's own life. "Yamato damashii" is synonymous with "Yamato gokoro" (lit. "Japanese heart").
A heavenly deity, identified as a child of Taka-mi-musubi-no-kami, who is always called upon to "ponder" (omopu) and give good counsel in the deliberations of the heavenly deities. Appears to have descended from the heavens in the heavenly descent myth. OMOI, id., "think"; KANE, id., "metal," but preferably from the verb "to combine," "to possess simultaneously." "Thought-Combining Deity," a deity of wisdom or good counsel able to hold many thoughts at once or to combine in one mind the mental powers of many individuals. In the Kojiki the name is Ya-gokoro-omoi-kane-no-mikoto, "Many-Minds'-Thought-Combining Deity." Also called Toko-yo-no-Omoikane-no-kami.