Synonyms for gruter or Related words with gruter

wolkers              hellriegel              nolten              groos              noordegraaf              romein              klopper              abeel              nyssen              brugmans              seqq              westdijk              knappert              gijsen              bondeson              haubrich              benecke              gijsbertus              roever              peirs              werp              blahoslav              medendorp              neupert              terlouw              stelter              goedicke              waspe              gieske              braren              moriau              saerens              lankhorst              kloek              bladh              campert              knodel              beukema              ohmann              adriaens              denef              weidenbach              audenaert              kikkert              nepomucen              koops              westenholz              schildt              gottheil              beijer             



Examples of "gruter"
Gruter, Margaret and Roger D. Masters, eds., 1984. "Ostracism: A Social and Biological Phenomenon." http://www.bepress.com/gruterclassics/ostracism (ISBN 0-317-55376-3).
Jan Gruter or Gruytère, Latinized as Janus Gruterus (3 December 1560 – 20 September 1627), was a Flemish-born philologist, scholar, and librarian.
The principal source for Catherine Tishem's life is a worshipful tribute to her son, Jan Gruter, written by one of his pupils, Balthasar Venator.
Masters, Roger D. and Margaret Gruter, eds.,1992. "The Sense of Justice: Biological Foundations of Law." Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications (ISBN 0-8039-4398-9).
In 1558, Tishem married Gualtherius Gruter, burgomaster of Antwerp. Ten years later, they fled religious persecution to the Dutch exile community of Norwich in England. Catherine eventually returned to the Netherlands in 1577.
Jan Gruter was born in Antwerp. His father was Wouter Gruter, who was a merchant and city administrator of Antwerp, and his mother was Catharina Tishem from Norwich in England. To avoid religious persecution in the early stages of the Eighty Years' War, his parents emigarated to England while he was a child. For some years he studied at Caius College, Cambridge, after which he went to Leiden. In 1584 he obtained the degree of doctor iris. He then left the Netherlands and commenced a period of travel that brought him to France, Switzerland, Italy and finally to North and East Germany. His neo-Latin poems are published in Heidelberg at this time.
Erditse is a god of the ancient Aquitaine Gaul, known by only one inscription which was discovered, in the 16th century, by Joseph Justus Scaliger on a votive altar found in the Parliament of Toulouse. The inscription was published in "Inscriptiones totius orbis Romani antiquae" by Jan Gruter.
Relentlessly trying to finish his project as well as possible, Nicolasito ends up confronting endless impediments, stemming from his relationships with the Lombardos and with a host of other characters, including: Mascardi, old Gruter and his assistant Gladys, the Lombardo’s landlady, Mr. Lemonier and his girlfriend Laura, and Lo Pietro the undertaker and his monkey. Running around the city, Nicolasito finds himself in a foggy and fantasmagorical atmosphere in which two teams – the Lombardos vs. everyone else – are fighting over him.
Salmasius was born at Semur-en-Auxois in Burgundy. His father, a counsellor of the parlement of Dijon, sent him, at the age of sixteen, to Paris, where he became intimate with Isaac Casaubon (1559–1614). In 1606 he went to the University of Heidelberg, where he studied under the jurist Denis Godefroy, and devoted himself to the classics, influenced by the librarian Jan Gruter.
GG Quadster is a motorized four-wheeler, or quadricycle, consisting of a BMW K1200S motorcycle with a reworked suspension and steering, and additional wheels. It has been made by Swiss manufacturer Grüter + Gut Motorradtechnik GmbH (GG) (aka "Gruter und Gut") since 2008. The BMW inline-four engine produces 167 horsepower. In Germany it can be licensed as a four-wheel motor-bike, while in California it was not approved by regulators.
In 1590, Gruter was appointed professor of history at the University of Wittenberg. As a Calvinist, he refused to subscribe to the "formula concordiae", the authoritative Lutheran statement of faith, and lost his position as a result in 1592. From 1589 to 1592, he taught at Rostock, after which he went to Heidelberg, where in 1602 he was appointed librarian to the university. He died at Bierhelderhof, Heidelberg.
As the 16th century was passing, the late humanism stepped beside Calvinism as a predominant school of thought; and figures like Paul Schede, Jan Gruter, Martin Opitz, and Matthäus Merian taught at the university. It attracted scholars from all over the continent and developed into a cultural and academic center. However, with the beginning of the Thirty Years' War in 1618, the intellectual and fiscal wealth of the university declined. In 1622, the then-world-famous Bibliotheca Palatina (the library of the university) was stolen from the University Cathedral and taken to Rome. The reconstruction efforts thereafter were defeated by the troops of King Louis XIV, who destroyed Heidelberg in 1693 almost completely.
Memberships, fellowships: Humanwissenschaftliches Zentrum, University of Munich; Parmenides Foundation for the Study of Thinking, Munich; Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Wassenaar/Netherlands (1971/72); Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, N.M, U.S.A. (1992/93, 1995/96, 2002); Gruter Institute for Law and Behavioral Research, Portola Valley, CA, U.S.A. (since 1992). Guest professorships: Georgetown University Law Center, Washington, D.C. (1962, 1966); University of Michigan School of Law, Ann Arbor, MI, U.S.A. (1955, 1987); Yale Law School and Yale's Department of Anthropology, New Haven, CT, U.S.A. 1986; University of Nanjing (1993); University of California School of Law, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A. (1980/81, 1988; 1992, 1996–2000).
Solona was an ancient town of Gallia Cispadana, mentioned by Pliny among the municipal towns of the 8th region (Plin. iii. 15. s. 20), but the name of the Solonates is found also in an inscription, which confirms its municipal rank (Gruter, "Inscr." p. 1095. 2). Unfortunately this inscription, which was found at Ariminum (modern Rimini), affords no clue to the site of Solona: it is placed by Cluver at a place called Città del Sole (in the "comune" of Castrocaro Terme e Terra del Sole) about 8 km southwest of Forlì; but Smith claims that this site would seem too close to the latter, then the important town of "Forum Livii". (Cluver, "Ital.", p. 291.)
Rogers was known to Jan Gruter, and wrote to Hadrianus Junius asking him for early references to the history of Ireland; he was acquainted with Justus Lipsius, perhaps from a meeting in 1577. In the late 1570s Rogers was having discussions with John Dee, concerned with the conquests made by King Arthur, and the titles of Queen Elizabeth. He may have brought Ortelius to Mortlake in 1577. As a consequence of a meeting Dee and Rogers had in 1578, the conquests of King Malgo were added to Dee's imperial schematic. Ortelius tried to have Rogers continue Humphrey Llwyd's work in ancient chorography, but without success, Rogers preferring the humanist literary approach. At the end of his life Rogers was in touch with Bonaventura Vulcanius, through Philips of Marnix, on the subject of runic alphabets.
Neuroscience and the law have interacted over a long history, but interest spiked in the late 1990s. After the term neurolaw was first coined by Sherrod J. Taylor in 1991, scholars from both fields began to network through presentations and dialogs. This led to an increasing pull to publish books, articles, and other literature. The Gruter Institute for Law and Behavioral Research and the Dana Foundation were the first groups to provide funding for the new interdisciplinary field. Parallel to the expansion of neurolaw, an emergence of ethics specifically regarding neuroscience was developing as well. The intersection of neurolaw and ethics was able to be better scrutinized by the initiation of the Law and Neuroscience Project in 2007. The MacArthur Foundation launched Phase I of its project through a $10 million grant in hope of integrating the two fields. The initiative sustained forty projects addressing a multitude of issues, including experimental and theoretical data that will provide further evidence as to how neuroscience may eventually shape the law. This new field of study has also piqued the interests of several universities. Baylor College of Medicine's Initiative on Neuroscience and the Law’s research seeks to research, educate, and make policy change. The University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Neuroscience and Society began in July 2009, and is working towards confronting the social, legal, and ethical inferences of neuroscience.
Currently Erhard devotes his time to scholarly research and writing and presentations of his ideas. He participated in an event on May 11, 2004 at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University entitled "From Thought to Action: Growing Leaders in a Changing World". The event was in honor of a friend, Warren Bennis, who had taken the est Training and for some time consulted with Werner Erhard and Associates. In 2007, he presented a talk exploring the link between integrity, leadership, and increased performance at the John F. Kennedy Center for Public Leadership, led a course on integrity at the 2007 MIT Sloan School of Management's SIP (Sloan Innovation Period), and spoke at the Harvard Law School program on Corporate Governance. In 2008, he took part in a presentation on integrity at DePaul University and co-led a course on leadership at the Simon School of Business. In 2009 he presented "Being a Leader and the Effective Exercise of Leadership: An Ontological Model" at the Gruter Institute Squaw Valley Conference: Law, Behavior & the Brain.
Besides Gilbert's "De Magnete", there appeared at Amsterdam in 1651 a quarto volume of 316 pages entitled "De Mundo Nostro Sublunari Philosophia Nova" (New Philosophy about our Sublunary World), edited—some say by his brother William Gilbert Junior, and others say, by the eminent English scholar and critic John Gruter—from two manuscripts found in the library of Sir William Boswell. According to Dr. John Davy, "this work of Gilbert's, which is so little known, is a very remarkable one both in style and matter; and there is a vigor and energy of expression belonging to it very suitable to its originality. Possessed of a more minute and practical knowledge of natural philosophy than Bacon, his opposition to the philosophy of the schools was more searching and particular, and at the same time probably little less efficient." In the opinion of Prof. John Robison, "De Mundo" consists of an attempt to establish a new system of natural philosophy upon the ruins of the Aristotelian doctrine.
Martin Luther's disputation at Heidelberg in April 1518 made a lasting impact, and his adherents among the masters and scholars soon became leading Reformationists in Southwest Germany. With the Palatinate's turn to the Reformed faith, Otto Henry, Elector Palatine, converted the university into a calvinsitic institution. In 1563, the Heidelberg Catechism was created under collaboration of members of the university's divinity school. As the 16th century was passing, the late humanism stepped beside Calvinism as a predominant school of thought; and figures like Paul Schede, Jan Gruter, Martin Opitz, and Matthäus Merian taught at the university. It attracted scholars from all over the continent and developed into a cultural and academic center. However, with the beginning of the Thirty Years' War in 1618, the intellectual and fiscal wealth of the university declined. In 1622, the then-world-famous Bibliotheca Palatina (the library of the university) was stolen from the University Cathedral and taken to Rome. The reconstruction efforts thereafter were defeated by the troops of King Louis XIV, who destroyed Heidelberg in 1693 almost completely.