Synonyms for guaicuru or Related words with guaicuru

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Examples of "guaicuru"
After studying humanities at the University of Tübingen, he obtained a doctorate in philosophy at Würzburg with a thesis on the Guaicuru.
They are a branch of the Guaycuru peoples and speak the characteristic Kadiweu language that belongs to the Mataco–Guaicuru family. They are the last surviving group of Mbayá peoples.
They speak the Nivaclé language, which has two dialects: Forest Nivaclé and River Nivaclé. Nivaclé is one of the Mataco-Guaicuru languages. A dictionary has been published for the language, and the Bible was translated into Nivaclé in 1995.
Mataco–Guaicuru or Macro-Waikurúan is a hypothetical language family consisting of the Guaicuruan, Matacoan, and sometimes Mascoian and Charruan families. These are spoken in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia.
Their name is now spelled "Kadiwéu" in Portuguese (plural Kadiwéus). The Kadiweu are also known as the Cadiguebo, Cadioeo, Caduveo, Caduvéo, Caduví, Cayua, Guaicuru, Kadiveo, Kadivéu, Kadiweu, Kaduveo, Kaiwa, or Mbayá-Guaikurú.
The Payagua language is extinct; it is hypothesized to have been part of the Mataco-Guaicuru languages. No people remain who identify as Payaguá; the descendants of the tribe merged with other Paraguayans, either as mestizos or members of other Guaycuru.
Wichí Lhamtés Vejoz is a Mataco-Guaicuru language of Argentina and Bolivia. Speakers are concentrated in northern parts of Chaco, Formosa, Salta, Jujuy Provinces, as well as west of Toba, the upper Bermejo River valley, and Pilcomayo River. The language is also called "Mataco Vejoz" and "Vejos".
The name is written guaycurú or guaicurú in Spanish (plural guaycurúes or guaicurúes), and guaicuru in Portuguese (plural guaicurus). It was originally an offensive epithet given to some Mbayá tribes of Paraguay by the Guarani, meaning "savage" or "barbarian", which later got extended to the whole group. It has also been used in the past to include other tribes of the region, but is now restricted to those speaking a Mataco–Guaycuru language.