Synonyms for gzhung or Related words with gzhung

rgyas              mkhar              brgyad              gling              khri              mchog              ldan              mtsho              dbang              rgyan              tshogs              bstan              paung              sgrub              rgya              nawng              tshul              bkra              sangkae              brtan              samraong              kyauk              gter              btsun              thub              tshang              gyur              dkon              shis              rdzong              phrul              chambak              srong              btsan              riang              daung              rgyal              skyong              skyid              lhan              chrey              preaek              dgon              thlok              chhuk              phyug              tuek              kbal              snang              dzin             



Examples of "gzhung"
In the Tibetan language, the opera is called "Al-che-lha-mo", the actor "lha-mo-ba" and the script "khrab-gzhung".
The Council of Ministers (Dzongkha: ལྷན་རྒྱས་གཞུང་ཚོགས་; Wylie: "lhan-rgyas gzhung-tshogs") is the highest executive body in Bhutan. It was created in 1999 by Jigme Singye Wangchuck, the fourth King of Bhutan.
The Kuri Chhu originates from the Kula Kangri Glacier in the Tibet Autonomous Region of People's Republic of China where it is known as the Lhozhag Nub Qu (Tibetan: "lho brag nub chu", Roman Dzongkha: "Lhobrak Chhu") and Xung Qu (Tibetan: gzhung chu), and another origin is the Lhozhag Xar Qu (Tibetan: "lho brag shar chu") a.k.a. Damxoi Xung Qu (tib. "gtam zhol gzhung chu") originates between the Xoijin Qênri and the Tar Lhari. It crosses into Bhutan at a relatively low elevation of , flowing in a southerly direction up to Nye and changes its course to south-easterly until it reaches Lhuentse Dzong. Further downstream the Kuri Chhu flows in a south-westerly direction and joins the Manas River.
Under the 2008 Constitution, the Dratshang Lhentshog is made up of seven members: the Je Khenpo as Chairman; the Five Lopons (Dzongkha: སློབ་དཔོན་ལྔ་; Wylie: "slob-dpon lnga") of the Zhung Dratshang (Dzongkha: གཞུང་གྲྭ་ཚང་; Wylie: "gzhung grwa-tshang"; "Central Monastic Body"); and a civil servant Secretary. Under the 2008 Constitution, it is mandated that the Zhung Dratshang and "rabdeys" (monastic bodies in dzongs other than Punakha and Thimphu) receive state funding and facilities adequate to support the Drukpa Kagyu sect.
The Kuri Chhu, also known as the Lhozhag Xung Qu (tib. lho brag gzhung chu) or Norbu Lag Qu (tib. nor bu lag chu), is a major river of eastern Bhutan, that has formed a scenic valley with high peaks and steep hills. Kuri Chhu is a tributary of the Manas River system, which is the largest river of Bhutan and a major tributary of the Brahmaputra River that drains most of eastern Bhutan.
Zhungdra (Dzongkha: གཞུང་སྒྲ་; Wylie: "gzhung-sgra"; "center music") is one of the two dominant forms of Bhutanese folk music. It was developed in the 17th century, and is associated with the folk music of the central valleys of Paro, Thimphu, and Punakha, the heart of the Ngalop cultural area. Although considered secular, the lyrics of zhungdra songs often tell Buddhist allegories, such as "Yak Legbi Lhadar", in which the singer tells of his former life as a yak slaughtered in connection with a non-Buddhist ritual in the Gasa District.
Further issues followed later in AD 1913. All these notes are dated to the Tibetan Era year 1659, which began in February AD 1913. They are as follows: a 10 tam note (red), a 15 tam note (violet), a 25 tam note (brown or yellow), and a 50 tam note (blue or purple). Like the two earlier issues, they bear a red seal representing the authority of the Dalai Lama and a black seal which has the following inscription in 'phags pa ( also called "seal script") Tibetan script: "gzhung dngul khang," and can be translated as "government treasury" or "government bank".
The second branch is formed by two main tributaries known as Kargyag river, with its source near the Shingo La (5,091 m) (16,703 ft), and Tsarap river, with its source near the Baralacha-La. These two rivers unite below the village of Purne to form the Lungnak river (also known as the Lingti or Tsarap). The Lungnak river then flows north-westwards along a narrow gorge towards Zanskar's central valley (known locally as gzhung khor), where it unites with the Doda river to form the Zanskar river.
The purpose of the college at Dolanji was to preserve the tradition of philosophy established and developed at Yeru Wensaka ("gyas ru dben sa kha"), where philosophical analysis and logic were applied to the understanding of "Do Ngag Semsum" ("mdo sngags sems gsum"), that is, to the teachings of the Sutras, the Tantras and Dzogchen. Unlike the Nyingmapa tradition, the Bönpos developed a system of logic and debate specifically relating to the Dzogchen teaching. At Menri in Tibet, all instruction in Tantra and Dzogchen was done in private except for the philosophy college where the monks studied the five scripture system Dozhung Nga ("mdo gzhung lnga")
"Rang byung was renowned as a systematizer of the Gcod teachings developed by Ma gcig lab sgron. His texts on Gcod include the "Gcod kyi khrid yig"; the "Gcod bka' tshoms chen mo'i sa bcad" which consists of a topical outline of and commentary on Ma gcig lab sgron's "Shes rab kyi pha rol tu phyin pa zab mo gcod kyi man ngag gi gzhung bka' tshoms chen mo "; the "Tshogs las yon tan kun 'byung "; the lengthy "Gcod kyi tshogs las rin po che'i phrenb ba 'don bsgrigs bltas chog tu bdod pa gcod kyi lugs sor bzhag"; the "Ma lab sgron la gsol ba 'deb pa'i mgur ma"; the "Zab mo bdud kyi gcod yil kyi khrid yig", and finally the "Gcod kyi nyams len"."
The Zanskar River is a north-flowing tributary of the Indus. In its upper reaches, the Zanskar has two main branches. First of these, the Doda, has its source near the Pensi-la mountain-pass and flows south-eastwards along the main Zanskar valley leading towards Padum, the capital of Zanskar. The second branch is formed by two main tributaries known as Kargyag river, with its source near the Shingo La , and Tsarap river, with its source near the Baralacha-La. These two rivers unite below the village of Purne to form the Lungnak river (also known as the Lingti or Tsarap). The Lungnak river then flows north-westwards along a narrow gorge towards Zanskar's central valley (known locally as gzhung khor), where it unites with the Doda river to form the main Zanskar river. This river then takes a north-eastern course through the dramatic Zanskar Gorge until it joins the Indus near Nimmu in Ladakh.
The Emblem of Tibet is a symbol of the Tibetan government in exile. It combines several elements of the flag of Tibet, with slightly different artistry, and contains many Buddhist symbols. Its primary elements are the sun and moon above the Himalayas, which represent Tibet, often known as the "Land Surrounded by Snow Mountains". On the slopes of the mountains stand a pair of snow lions. Held between the two lions is the eight-spoked Dharmacakra, represent the Noble Eightfold Path of Buddhism. Inside the wheel, the three-colored swirling jewel represents the practices of the ten exalted virtues and the 16 humane modes of conduct. The inscription on the swirling banner below is as follows:"bod gzhung dga' ldan pho brang phyogs las rnam rgyal" ("Tibetan Government, Gaden Palace, victorious in all directions".) The Gaden Palace, located in Drepung monastery was the residence of the Dalai Lamas until the 5th Dalai Lama. After the 5th Dalai Lama had moved to the Potala in the mid 17th century the Tibetan Government created by him in 1642 became known as the "Gaden Podang" Government.