Synonyms for harrisia or Related words with harrisia

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Examples of "harrisia"
Harrisia brasiliensis is a species of tachinid flies in the genus "Harrisia" of the family Tachinidae.
Harrisia scutellaris is a species of tachinid flies in the genus "Harrisia" of the family Tachinidae.
"Harrisia pomanensis" is considered an exotic invasive in Australia.
Harrisia is a genus of tachinid fly containing two species.
"Harrisia tortuosa" is considered an exotic invasive in Australia.
Leschenaultia is a genus of flies in the family Tachinidae. It may be synonymous with the genus "Harrisia", but the type material of "Harrisia" has been lost, hindering comparisons. "Leschenaultia" comprises 32 species, distributed across the Americas:
Harrisia tortuosa is a species of cactus in the Trichocereeae tribe.
Harrisia aboriginum (prickly applecactus) is a species of cactus endemic to peninsular Florida.
Harrisia simpsonii (Simpson's applecactus) is a species of cactus in the Trichocereeae tribe.
Harrisia cactus is an exotic invasive in Australia, Africa, and the U.S. state of Hawaii.
"Harrisia martinii" is considered an exotic invasive in Australia, Africa, and the U.S. state of Hawaii.
Harrisia brasiliensis is a species of cactus in the Trichocereeae tribe.
The first description as "Cereus bonplandii" was realized at 1837 from Ludwig Georg Karl Pfeiffer. Nathaniel Lord Britton and Joseph Nelson Rose classified the type in 1920 as Genus "Harrisia". Nomenclatural synonyms are "Eriocereus bonplandii" (J.Parm. & Pfeiff.) Riccob. (1909) and "Harrisia pomanensis" subsp. "bonplandii" (J.Parm. & Pfeiff.) P.J.Braun & Esteves (1994, not the correct Name ICBN-Artikel 11.4).
Harrisia portoricensis is a species of cactus in the genus "Harrisia". Its common names include higo chumbo and Puerto Rico applecactus. It is endemic to Puerto Rico, where it is known from three smaller islands off the coast of the main island. The population is estimated at 59,000 on Mona Island, 148 individuals on Monito Island, and only 9 on Desecheo Island.
This park contains nearly all of the remaining populations of the fragrant prickly-apple ("Harrisia fragrans"), an endangered cactus species.
"Harrisia bonplandii" can be found in the southwest of Brasil, in Paraguay, in Bolivia and in the north of Argentina in the Chaco.
Studies have not been performed to determine the dietary habits of the Mona subspecies, but consumption of insects, spiders, fruits from "Pithecellobium" species and the cacti "Selenicereus" species, "Pilosocereus royenii", "Harrisia portoricensis", and "Opuntia" species, seeds from gumbo limbo ("Bursera simaruba") and "Ficus" species and nectar from "Aloe vera", yucca and "Croton discolor" have been observed.
Harrisia martinii, commonly called the Martin applecactus, is a species of night-blooming, rope-like cacti native to South America. With large showy flowers that attract the hawk moth, it is considered by some a useful landscape plant in areas that do not freeze.
The genus name "Trichocereus" was given to a number of columnar cacti in 1909 by Vincenzo Riccobono, before the genus was subsumed—along with "Lobivia"—into "Echinopsis" in 1974 by Friedrich. A 2012 genetic and morphological study by Albesiano found "Trichocereus" to be monophyletic if it included three species of "Harrisia".
Harrisia (applecactus and moonlight cactus) is a genus of night blooming cacti native to Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil, Bolivia, Uruguay, the Greater Antilles, the Bahamas, and the U.S. state of Florida. The genus is named after William Harris, an important botanist of Jamaica. There are about 20 species.