Synonyms for hypergonadotropic or Related words with hypergonadotropic

hypogonadotropic              hyperandrogenemia              oligomenorrhea              hypogonadotrophic              andropause              hypergonadism              hyperandrogenism              pcos              asthenozoospermia              subfertility              oligospermia              azoospermia              panhypopituitarism              hypogonadism              menoxenia              hyperprolactinemia              hypopituitarism              gynecomastia              fxpoi              asthenospermia              oligomenorrhoea              galactorrhea              klinefelter              hyperpilosity              virilization              feminization              hyperandrogenic              hyperinsulimemia              hypothyroid              prepubertal              cryptorchidism              andromorphous              perineoscrotal              hypoestrogenism              anovulation              hyperinsulinism              varicocele              hirsutism              giantism              ohss              hypomenorrhea              prolactinoma              virilism              gravidarum              hypoovarianism              oligozoospermia              nesidioblastosis              kleinefelter              postandropausal              postmenopausal             



Examples of "hypergonadotropic"
Various skeletal abnormalities (e.g., curvature of the spine) and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism often occur.
Generally, men with unexplained hypergonadotropic azoospermia need to undergo a chromosomal evaluation.
Turner syndrome is a cause of primary amenorrhea, premature ovarian failure (hypergonadotropic hypogonadism), streak gonads and infertility. Failure to develop secondary sex characteristics (sexual infantilism) is typical.
Women with 46 XX gonadal dysgenesis experience primary amenorrhea with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. There are forms of 46 xx gonadal dysgenesis wherein abnormalities in the FSH-receptor have been reported and are thought to be the cause of the hypogonadism.
Malouf syndrome (also known as "congestive cardiomyopathy-hypergonadotropic hypogonadism syndrome") is a congenital disorder that causes one or more of the following symptoms: mental retardation, ovarian dysgenesis, congestive cardiomyopathy, broad nasal base, blepharoptosis, and bone abnormalities, and occasionally marfanoid habitus (tall stature with long and thin limbs, little subcutaneous fat, arachnodactyly, joint hyperextension, narrow face, small chin, large testes, and hypotonia).
There are two primary ways to classify amenorrhoea. Types of amenorrhoea are classified as primary or secondary, or based on functional "compartments". The latter classification relates to the hormonal state of the patient that hypo-, eu-, or hypergonadotropic (whereby interruption to the communication between gonads and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) causes FSH levels to be either low, normal or high).
In this situation the testes are abnormal, atrophic, or absent, and sperm production severely disturbed to absent. FSH levels tend to be elevated (hypergonadotropic) as the feedback loop is interrupted (lack of feedback inhibition on FSH). The condition is seen in 49-93% of men with azoospermia. Testicular failure includes absence of failure production as well as low production and maturation arrest during the process of spermatogenesis.
FSH insensitivity presents itself in females as two clusters of symptoms: 1) hypergonadotropic hypogonadism or hypoestrogenism, resulting in a delayed, reduced, or fully absent puberty and associated sexual infantilism (if left untreated), reduced uterine volume, and osteoporosis; and 2) ovarian dysgenesis or failure, resulting in primary or secondary amenorrhea, infertility, and normal sized to slightly enlarged ovaries. Males on the other hand are significantly less affected, presenting merely with partial or complete infertility, reduced testicular volume, and oligozoospermia (reduced spermatogenesis).
Hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), also known as primary or peripheral/gonadal hypogonadism, is a condition which is characterized by hypogonadism due to an impaired response of the gonads to the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), and in turn a lack of sex steroid production and elevated gonadotropin levels (as an attempt of compensation by the body). HH may present as either "congenital" or "acquired", but the majority of cases are of the former nature.
Mutation in the FIGLA gene are associated with premature ovarian failure. Premature ovarian failure is a genetic disorder that leads to hypergonadotropic ovarian failure and infertility. It is believed that premature ovarian failure in humans is caused by FIGLA haploninsuffciency, which disrupts the formation of the primordial follicles. This was observed in FIGLA mice knockouts which had diminished follicular endowment and accelerated oocyte loss throughout their reproductive life span. Women with mutations in their FIGLA were shown to have a form of premature ovarian failure. As well as the failure to form primordial follicles, knockout mice also lacked zona pellucida genes Zp1, Zp2, and ZP3 expression.
Hypoandrogenism is caused primarily by either dysfunction, failure, or absence of the gonads ("hypergonadotropic") or impairment of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland ("hypogonadotropic"), which in turn can be caused by a multitude of different stimuli, including genetic conditions (e.g., GnRH/gonadotropin insensitivity and enzymatic defects of steroidogenesis), tumors, trauma, surgery, autoimmunity, radiation, infections, toxins, drugs, and many others. Alternatively, it may be the result of conditions such as androgen insensitivity syndrome or hyperestrogenism. More simply, old age may also be a factor in the development of hypoandrogenism, as androgen levels decline with age.
The symptoms of Leydig cell hypoplasia include pseudohermaphroditism (i.e., feminized, ambiguous, or relatively mildly underdeveloped (e.g., micropenis, severe hypospadias, and/or cryptorchidism (undescended testes)) external genitalia), a female gender identity or gender variance, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (hypogonadism despite high levels of gonadotropins), delayed, impaired, or fully absent puberty with an associated reduction in or complete lack of development of secondary sexual characteristics (sexual infantilism), impaired fertility or complete sterility, tall stature (due to delayed epiphyseal closure), eunuchoid skeletal proportions, delayed or absent bone maturation, and osteoporosis.
A progonadotropin, or hypergonadotropin, also known as a gonad stimulant, is a type of drug which increases the secretion of one or both of the major gonadotropins, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). This, in turn, results in increased function and maintenance of the gonads and increased gonadal steroidogenesis of sex hormones such as androgens, estrogens, and progestogens. Progonadotropins are the functional opposites of antigonadotropins. They have clinical applications in the treatment of hypogonadism and infertility. Conversely, hypergonadotropic effects can occur as a side effect of some drugs. Examples of progonadotropic drugs include gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists when administered in a pulsatile (as opposed to continuous) manner, antiestrogens such as tamoxifen, clomifene, fulvestrant, and aromatase inhibitors like anastrozole, and, only in men, pure antiandrogens such as flutamide, bicalutamide, and enzalutamide.
The symptoms of isolated 17,20-lyase deficiency, in males, include pseudohermaphroditism (i.e., feminized, ambiguous, or mildly underdeveloped (e.g., micropenis, perineal hypospadias, and/or cryptorchidism (undescended testes)) external genitalia), female gender identity, and, in non-complete cases of deficiency where partial virilization occurs, gynecomastia up to Tanner stage V (due to low androgen levels, which results in a lack of suppression of estrogen); in females, amenorrhoea or, in cases of only partial deficiency, merely irregular menses, and enlarged cystic ovaries (due to excessive stimulation by high levels of gonadotropins); and in both sexes, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (hypogonadism despite high levels of gonadotropins), delayed, impaired, or fully absent adrenarche and puberty with an associated reduction in or complete lack of development of secondary sexual characteristics (sexual infantilism), impaired fertility or complete sterility, tall stature (due to delayed epiphyseal closure), eunuchoid skeletal proportions, delayed or absent bone maturation, and osteoporosis.
Urine of postmenopausal women reflects the hypergonadotropic state of menopause -levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are high - and contain a mixture of these gonadotropins. Other protein substances may be present, including small amounts of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). In 1949 Piero Donini found a relatively simple method to extract gonadotropins from urine of postmenopausal women. Menotropins were successfully introduced into clinical use by Bruno Lunenfeld in 1961. While earlier menotropin medications contained FSH and LH at a 1:1 ratio, the recognition that it is FSH that is critical for follicle stimulation has led to development of newer preparations that contain a much higher FSH/LH ratio, Fertinex being an example.
Leydig cell hypoplasia (or aplasia) (LCH), also known as Leydig cell agenesis, is a rare autosomal recessive genetic and endocrine syndrome affecting an estimated 1 in 1,000,000 biological males. It is characterized by an inability of the body to respond to luteinizing hormone (LH), a gonadotropin which is normally responsible for signaling Leydig cells of the testicles to produce testosterone and other androgen sex hormones. The condition manifests itself as pseudohermaphroditism (partially or fully underdeveloped genitalia), hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (decreased or lack of production of sex steroids by the gonads despite high circulating levels of gonadotropins), reduced or absent puberty (lack of development of secondary sexual characteristics, resulting in sexual infantilism if left untreated), and infertility.
Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) insensitivity, or ovarian insensitivity to FSH in females, also referable to as ovarian follicle hypoplasia or granulosa cell hypoplasia in females, is a rare autosomal recessive genetic and endocrine syndrome affecting both females and males, with the former presenting with much greater severity of symptomatology. It is characterized by a resistance or complete insensitivity to the effects of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a gonadotropin which is normally responsible for the stimulation of estrogen production by the ovaries in females and maintenance of fertility in both sexes. The condition manifests itself as hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (decreased or lack of production of sex steroids by the gonads despite high circulating levels of gonadotropins), reduced or absent puberty (lack of development of secondary sexual characteristics, resulting in sexual infantilism if left untreated), amenorrhea (lack of menstruation), and infertility in females, whereas males present merely with varying degrees of infertility and associated symptoms (e.g., decreased sperm production).
About 10% of cases of moyamoya disease are familial, and some cases result from specific genetic mutations. Susceptibility to moyamoya disease-2 (MYMY2; 607151) is caused by variation in the RNF213 gene (613768) on chromosome 17q25. Moyamoya disease-5 (MYMY5; 614042) is caused by mutation in the ACTA2 gene (102620) on chromosome 10q23.3; and moyamoya disease-6 with achalasia (MYMY6; 615750) is caused by mutation in the GUCY1A3 gene (139396) on chromosome 4q32. Loci for the disorder have been mapped to chromosome 3p (MYMY1) and chromosome 8q23 (MYMY3; 608796). See also MYMY4 (300845), an X-linked recessive syndromic disorder characterized by moyamoya disease, short stature, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and facial dysmorphism. and linked to q25.3, on chromosome 17". (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, omim.org/entry/252350).
It was described in a 15-year-old mentally challenged boy who showed signs of Klinefelter syndrome; however, chromosome testing revealed 48, XXYY instead of the 47, XXY arrangement known to be the cause. Because of this, 48, XXYY syndrome was originally considered a variation of Klinefelter syndrome. Shared physical and medical features resulting from the presence of an extra X chromosome include tall stature, the development of testosterone deficiency in adolescence and/or adulthood (hypergonadotropic hypogonadism), and infertility. However, recent research shows some important differences in males with 48, XXYY compared to 47, XXY. The most important differences result from the effects of the extra X and Y chromosome on neurodevelopment, leading to higher rates of developmental delays in early childhood, learning disability or intellectual disability, adaptive functioning (life skills) difficulties, neurodevelopmental disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorders, and psychological/behavioral problems including anxiety, depression, and mood dysregulation. Also, a larger percentage of males with XXYY have additional medical problems such as seizures, congenital elbow malformations (radioulnar synostosis), and tremor compared to males with XXY. XXYY is still considered a variation of Klinefelter syndrome by some definitions, mainly because the pathophysiology of the testicular dysfunction has not been shown to differ from 47, XXY, and the most current research does not suggest that there should be any differences in the evaluation and treatment of testosterone deficiency in 48, XXYY compared to 47, XXY. However, for the psychological and behavioral symptoms of XXYY syndrome, more extensive evaluations, interventions, and supports are usually needed compared to 47, XXY due to more complex neurodevelopmental involvement. There is significant variability between individuals in the number and severity of the medical and neurodevelopmental problems associated with XXYY, and some individuals have mild symptoms while others are more significantly affected.