Synonyms for hypogeusia or Related words with hypogeusia

hyposmia              dysgeusia              anosmia              phantosmia              phantageusia              hyperosmia              dysosmia              ageusia              sialorrhea              hypoesthesia              hypergeusia              paresthesias              hypersalivation              dyosmia              algopareunia              phonophobia              dysomia              osmophobia              paraesthesia              dysesthesia              parosmia              hyperacousis              hyposalivation              anosmiatype              atonic              dysphasia              diaphoresis              hyperacusis              hypoactivity              nauseas              troposmia              somnolence              rhinorrhea              convulsion              glossopharangela              neurasthenia              dysphoria              xerostomia              brachioradial              obtundation              anhidrosis              pollakiuria              paresis              hyperarousal              cephalea              obstipation              anorgasmia              hemiballism              glossodynia              hypesthesia             



Examples of "hypogeusia"
Causes of hypogeusia include the chemotherapy drug bleomycin, an antitumor antibiotic as well as zinc deficiency.
Hypogeusia is a reduced ability to taste things (to taste sweet, sour, bitter, or salty substances). The complete lack of taste is referred to as ageusia.
Carbonic anhydrase 6 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the "CA6" gene. It is also called 'gustin' because of its presence in saliva, and lower-than-normal levels of salivary zinc in individuals with hypogeusia.
Taste loss can vary from true aguesia, a complete loss of taste, to hypogeusia, a partial loss of taste, to dysgeusia, a distortion or alteration of taste. The primary cause of ageusia involves damage to the lingual nerve, which receives the stimuli from taste buds for the front two-thirds of the tongue, or the glossopharyngeal nerve, which acts similarly for the back third. Damage may be due to neurological disorders, such as Bell’s palsy or multiple sclerosis, as well as infectious diseases such as meningoencephalopathy. Other causes include a vitamin B deficiency, as well as taste bud death due to acidic/spicy foods, radiation, and/or tobacco use.
Ageusia ( ) is the loss of taste functions of the tongue, particularly the inability to detect sweetness, sourness, bitterness, saltiness, and umami (meaning "pleasant/savory taste"). It is sometimes confused with anosmia – a loss of the sense of smell. Because the tongue can only indicate texture and differentiate between sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and umami, most of what is perceived as the sense of taste is actually derived from smell. True ageusia is relatively rare compared to hypogeusia – a partial loss of taste – and dysgeusia – a distortion or alteration of taste.
Ageusia is the loss of taste, particularly the inability to detect sweetness, sourness, bitterness, saltiness, and umami (meaning "pleasant/savory taste"). It is sometimes confused with anosmia (a loss of the sense of smell). Because the tongue can only indicate texture and differentiate between sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and umami, most of what is perceived as the sense of taste is actually derived from smell. True ageusia is relatively rare compared to hypogeusia (a partial loss of taste) and dysgeusia (a distortion or alteration of taste).
Dysgeusia, also known as parageusia, is a distortion of the sense of taste. Dysgeusia is also often associated with ageusia, which is the complete lack of taste, and hypogeusia, which is a decrease in taste sensitivity. An alteration in taste or smell may be a secondary process in various disease states, or it may be the primary symptom. The distortion in the sense of taste is the only symptom, and diagnosis is usually complicated since the sense of taste is tied together with other sensory systems. Common causes of dysgeusia include chemotherapy, asthma treatment with albuterol, and zinc deficiency. Different drugs could also be responsible for altering taste and resulting in dysgeusia. Due to the variety of causes of dysgeusia, there are many possible treatments that are effective in alleviating or terminating the symptoms of dysgeusia. These include artificial saliva, pilocarpine, zinc supplementation, alterations in drug therapy, and alpha lipoic acid.