Synonyms for hypopituitarism or Related words with hypopituitarism

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Examples of "hypopituitarism"
Sheehan's syndrome, also known as Simmond's syndrome, postpartum hypopituitarism or postpartum pituitary gland necrosis, is hypopituitarism (decreased functioning of the pituitary gland), caused by ischemic necrosis due to blood loss and hypovolemic shock during and after childbirth.
Hypopituitarism is usually permanent. It requires lifelong treatment with one or more medicines.
Hypopituitarism commonly develops after radiation therapy for sellar and parasellar neoplasms, extrasellar brain tumours, head and neck tumours, and following whole body irradiation for systemic malignancies. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism mainly affects growth hormone and gonadal hormones. In contrast, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiencies are the least common among people with radiation-induced hypopituitarism. Changes in prolactin-secretion is usually mild, and vasopressin deficiency appears to be very rare as a consequence of radiation.
Pituitary macroadenomas are the most common cause of hypopituitarism, and in the majority of cases they are non-secreting adenomas.
Hypoglycemia due to hormone deficiencies such as hypopituitarism or adrenal insufficiency usually ceases when the appropriate hormone is replaced.
A study in "The Lancet" showed that out of a sample of people bitten by "D. russelii" who survived, 29% of them suffered severe damage to their pituitary glands, which later resulted in hypopituitarism. Other scientific studies support the hypothesis that "D. russelii" bites can cause hypopituitarism.
Generally, the finding of a combination of a low pituitary hormone together with a low hormone from the effector gland is indicative of hypopituitarism. Occasionally, the pituitary hormone may be normal but the effector gland hormone decreased; in this case, the pituitary is not responding appropriately to effector hormone changes, and the combination of findings is still suggestive of hypopituitarism.
It is recommended that men primary hypopituitarism may be linked to a genetic cause, a genetic evaluation is indicated in men with azoospermia due to primary hypopituitarism. Azoospermic men with testicular failure are advised to undergo karyotype and Y-micro-deletion testing.
Pretesticular azoospermia may be caused by congential hypopituitarism, Kallmann syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and other genetic conditions that lead to GnRH or gonadotropin deficiency.
Hormonal disturbances may occur secondary to hypopituitarism, occurring immediately or years after injury in 10 to 15% of TBI patients. Development of diabetes insipidus or an electrolyte abnormality acutely after injury indicate need for endocrinologic work up. Signs and symptoms of hypopituitarism may develop and be screened for in adults with moderate TBI and in mild TBI with imaging abnormalities. Children with moderate to severe head injury may also develop hypopituitarism. Screening should take place 3 to 6 months, and 12 months after injury, but problems may occur more remotely.
Hearing loss, epilepsy, cleft lip and palate, acute precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, and hypopituitarism are uncommon.
The signs and symptoms of hypopituitarism vary, depending on which hormones are undersecreted and on the underlying cause of the abnormality. The diagnosis of hypopituitarism is made by blood tests, but often specific scans and other investigations are needed to find the underlying cause, such as tumors of the pituitary, and the ideal treatment. Most hormones controlled by the secretions of the pituitary can be replaced by tablets or injections. Hypopituitarism is a rare disease, but may be significantly underdiagnosed in people with previous traumatic brain injury. The first description of the condition was made in 1914 by the German physician Dr Morris Simmonds.
Treatment of hypopituitarism is threefold: removing the underlying cause, treating the hormone deficiencies, and addressing any other repercussions that arise from the hormone deficiencies.
Hypoprolactinemia can result from hypopituitarism, excessive dopaminergic action in the tuberoinfundibular pathway and ingestion of D receptor agonists such as bromocriptine.
This gene encodes a member of the SOX (SRY-related HMG-box) family of transcription factors involved in the regulation of embryonic brain development and in determination of cell fate. The encoded protein acts as a transcriptional activator. Mutations in this gene have been associated with X-linked hypopituitarism (XH) and X-linked mental retardation. Patients with XH are male, have short stature, exhibit a mild form of mental retardation and present pan-hypopituitarism.
Avery was born in 1986 and raised in the Mormon religion. He has been diagnosed with hypopituitarism, which causes his youthful appearance. After his parents' 1993 divorce and disciplinary incidents at school, Avery used performance to work out his issues.
Single episodes of hypoglycemia may occur due to gastroenteritis or fasting, but recurrent episodes nearly always indicate either an inborn error of metabolism, congenital hypopituitarism, or congenital hyperinsulinism. A list of common causes:
The triple bolus test was introduced in 1973 by physicians from the London Royal Postgraduate Medical School and Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham. It followed earlier reports combining insulin and vasopressin analogues in the diagnosis of hypopituitarism.
Some systemic conditions may cause delayed tooth development, such as nutritional factors, endocrine disorders (hypothyroidism, hypopituitarism, hypoparathyroidism, pseudohypoparathyroidism), undiagnosed and untreated celiac disease, anemia, prematurity, low birth weight, renal failure, heavy metal intoxication or tobacco smoke, among others.
Metabolic and endocrine problems which may lead to constipation include: hypercalcemia, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, porphyria, chronic kidney disease, pan-hypopituitarism, diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, and celiac disease. Constipation is also common in individuals with muscular and myotonic dystrophy.