Synonyms for ippolito_aldobrandini or Related words with ippolito_aldobrandini

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Examples of "ippolito_aldobrandini"
Ippolito Aldobrandini (1592 – 19 July 1638) was a Catholic Cardinal. He served as Camerlengo of the Holy Roman Church from 1623 to 1638. Pope Clement VIII, whose birth name was also Ippolito Aldobrandini, was his great-uncle.
Ippolito Aldobrandini may refer to various members of the Aldobrandini family:
He was a learned Roman lawyer, studied music with Giovanni Maria Nanino ('Nanini'), also in Rome, and entered the service of cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini in 1621.
Santori received the greatest number of votes in almost each ballot, but was not able to secure the required majority of two thirds and support for him gradually diminished. Eventually on January 29 Cardinal Montalto decided to switch to support the candidature of Ippolito Aldobrandini and was able to secure significant votes for him. Madruzzo then accepted that the opposition against him was too strong and switched to Ippolito Aldobrandini as more acceptable than Santori. This was the decisive moment of this conclave.
La catena d'Adone ("The Chain of Adonis") is the only surviving opera by the Italian composer Domenico Mazzocchi. It was commissioned by Cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini and first performed at the Palazzo Conti, Rome on February 12, 1626. The libretto, in a prologue and five acts, is by Ottavio Tronsarelli and is based on episodes from Giambattista Marino's epic poem "Adone" (1623).
Born in Terni in Umbria—a region of Italy at that time part of the Papal States—he studied in Perugia then moved to Rome, where he served as secretary of cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini, later Pope Clement VIII (d. 1605), and for a time as chief notary to the Papacy.
Now as a cardinal, there were few who would publicly speak ill of Brancaccio, though they may have wanted to. He was restored to his bishopric where he remained until 1635 when yet another conflict with yet another Vice-King saw him resign. While in Naples he worked closely with cardinals Francesco Boncompagni and Ippolito Aldobrandini.
Cardinal Mantalto put Ippolito Aldobrandini up but Cardinal Madruzzo, who was the leader of the Spanish fraction according to the will of King Philip II, effectively torpedoed this candidacy. Nomination of Cardinal Vincenzo Lauro who was put up by Montalo and Sforza suffered the same fate.
A member of the Aldobrandini family, Giovanni Aldobrandini was born in Fano in 1525, the son of Salvestro Aldobrandini, governor of Fano, and Lisa Donati. His younger brother, Ippolito Aldobrandini (1536–1605), became Pope Clement VIII in 1592. He was the uncle of Cardinals Pietro Aldobrandini and Cinzio Passeri Aldobrandini.
On January 30, 1592 Cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini was unanimously elected to the papacy and took the name of Clement VIII. On February 2 he was consecrated to the episcopate by Cardinal Alfonso Gesualdo, bishop of Ostia e Velletri and dean of the College of Cardinals. Seven days later he was solemnly crowned by Francesco Sforza di Santa Fiora, deacon of S. Maria in Via Lata.
The Aldobrandini are an Italian noble family from Florence, with close ties to the Vatican. Its Roman fortunes were made when Ippolito Aldobrandini became pope under the name Pope Clement VIII. He arranged the marriage that linked the Aldobrandini with the Roman family of Pamphili. Additionally, they were also linked to marriage alliances with the Farnese (Ranuccio I, duke of Parma, had married Margherita Aldobrandini) and Borghese (since Olimpia Aldobrandini married Paolo Borghese).
In 1621 he was promoted to Secretary of Briefs to Pope Gregory XV and in 1623 he became chamberlain to Pope Urban VIII, whom he had come to know when, as Maffeo Barberini, he had been Cardinal legate to Bologna. With a lively intellect and an amiable character, he maintained an extensive correspondence with many of the great minds of his time, including Ippolito Aldobrandini, Michelangelo Buonarroti the Younger, Federigo Borromeo, Giovanni Battista Strozzi the younger, and Evangelista Torricelli.
He studied in Vienna and Prague. Then in 1588, at age 18, he moved to Rome to study at the Collegium Germanicum. While in Rome be befriended Cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini who was elected pope in 1592 and took the name Pope Clement VIII. Dietrichstein became the new pope's chamberlain and worked to represent the interests of his native Bohemia as canon of the cathedral chapters of Olomouc, Wroclav, Passau and Leitmeritz.
Polish-Austrian negotiations were held in the Silesian border towns of Będzin and Bytom, with the Polish delegation staying on their respective sides of the border – Polish, in Będzin, and Habsburg, in Bytom. Polish delegation was represented by Hieronim Rozdrażewski, the bishop of Kujawy, Andrzej Opaliński, the grand marshal, Stanisław Gostomski, the voivode of Rawa, Janusz Ostrogski, the voivode of Volhynia, and Jan Zamoyski, the grand chancellor. Austrian negotiators included bishop Stanislav Pavlovský and burgrave William of Rosenberg. Another notable participant was Cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini (future Pope Clement VIII), representing the Holy See at the Papal Legate, and acting as the mediator.
The palace was remodeled in the Renaissance style in the 16th century. The plan was prepared by several Italian architects, including Giovanni Cini da Siena, Bernardino de Gianotis Zanobi, and others. The palace was visited by Ippolito Aldobrandini, who later became Pope Clement VIII. Another major development took place during the reign of the Vasa family. The Royal Palace was refurbished in early Baroque style during the rule of Sigismund III Vasa. Matteo Castello, Giacopo Tencalla, and other artists participated in the 17th-century renovation.
He is described by Giovanni Baglione as possessing a collection, a "wunderkammer" of "bellissime bizzarrie" ("beautiful bizarre objects"), including among the objects exotic weaponry; fossilized plants; tiger, lion, and turtle skulls; oriental porcelain and sculpted crockery; a vest made of human skin; a harness for dragging whales on ice; a three-legged flea, Persian uniforms, and antiquities such as Roman coins, bronze lamps, and a few statuettes. After Napoletano’s death at Rome in 1628, bidding for such material was made by collectors such as Cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini (future Clement VIII) and Cassiano dal Pozzo.
The palace was remodelled in the Renaissance style in the 16th century. The plan was prepared by several Italian architects, including Giovanni Cini da Siena, Bernardino de Gianotis Zanobi, and others. The palace was visited by Ippolito Aldobrandini, who later became Pope Clement VIII. Another major development took place during the reign of the House of Vasa. The palace was refurbished in the early Baroque style during the rule of Sigismund III Vasa. Matteo Castello, Giacopo Tencalla, and other artists participated in the 17th-century renovation.
Cinzio was born in Senigallia, a son of Aurelio Personeni and Giulia Aldobrandini, the latter being sister to cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini (later Pope Clement VIII). In 1565 Cinzio began his studies in letters and law at Ippolito's household in Rome. Attending Rome's Collegio Germanico, the university of Perugia and the university of Padua, he graduated as a doctor of law at Padua. Cinzio accompanied Ippolito on the legation to bring an end to the war between Poland and Germany and in 1588 was back in Rome to bring news of the legation's success to pope Sixtus V.
The family also lends its name to the Palazzo Aldobrandini on the Quirinal Hill. The Aldobrandini family, having reached the height of its powers when Ippolito Aldobrandini became Pope Clement VIII (1592-1605), began the building of the villa. In 1600 Clement VIII acquired the Orti Vitelli on the Quirinal hill and in 1601 donated the property to his Cardinal-nephew Pietro Aldobrandini. The old buildings of the Vitelli Family were demolished and construction began on the new villa and adjacent garden. The villa was never the family seat as the Aldobrandini family owned even more splendid residences elsewhere in Rome. The villa on the Quirinal hill served essentially for ceremonial functions.
The paintings stayed in the room for which they were painted until 1598 when they were confiscated and taken to Rome by Cardinal Ippolito Aldobrandini ("junior") as Papal Legate. The group was separated in 1623, and the "Feast" left the Aldobrandini family in 1796–97, passing to the Camuccini family. The painting left Italy for England in 1853 and was bought by the 4th Duke of Northumberland, then sold in 1916 by the 7th Duke to the London dealer Thomas Agnew and Sons. It was bought in 1922 by the estate of the American magnate Peter A. B. Widener (d. 1915) and in 1942 entered the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. with the rest of his collection.