Synonyms for kalih or Related words with kalih

wolu              anyar              likur              kbachkun              welas              kambu              urang              puluh              siji              sapuluh              satunggal              prapat              huli              chaang              barang              riang              anyjabugij              siksa              ragat              bhru              pithu              shapta              telu              gova              kukur              geya              sekawan              tigang              darma              biday              krueng              nurani              sawo              burung              khatola              anjing              gaji              silu              khoyi              kachu              manuh              sangri              chaturasra              koyava              tinku              saang              ampek              kuay              tuhan              soppu             



Examples of "kalih"
The high-register combining forms "kalih-" 2 and "tigang-" 3 are used with "-likur, -dasa," and higher numerals (below), but not for the teens.
"gaway tepek i purwa sanghyang tapak ginaway denira shri jayabhupati prahajyan sunda. mwang tan hanani baryya baryya shila. irikang lwah tan pangalapa ikan sesini lwah. Makahingan sanghyang tapak wates kapujan i hulu, i sor makahingan ia sanghyang tapak wates kapujan i wungkalagong kalih matangyan pinagawayaken pra-sasti pagepageh. mangmang sapatha."
where T indicates the strike of the ketuk, P the kempul, N the kenong, and G the simultaneous stroke of the gong and kenong. The W indicates the wela, the pause where the kempul is omitted. Thus, the gong plays once, the kenong divides that into four parts, the kempul divides each of those in two, and the ketuk divides each of those further in two. Note that except for the kenong playing on the gong, the instruments do not play when the next one plays. The kendhang plays in kendhang kalih style. A typical lancaran has four gongs, at the end of which the larger gong ageng is played.
where p indicates the strike of the kempyang, T the ketuk, P the kempul, N the kenong, and G the simultaneous stroke of the gong and kenong. The W indicates the wela, the pause where the kempul is omitted. Thus, the gong plays once, the kenong divides that into two parts, the kempul (or wela) divides each of those in two, the ketuk divides each of those further in two, and finally the kempyang divides each of those in two. The kendhang usually plays in kendhang kalih style.
where p indicates the strike of the "kempyang", T the "ketuk", P the "kempul", N the "kenong", and G the simultaneous stroke of the "gong ageng" and "kenong". The W indicates the "wela", the pause where the "kempul" is omitted. Thus, the gong plays once, the "kenong" divides that into four parts, the "kempul" divides each of those in two, the "ketuk" divides each of those in two, and the "kempyang" divides each of those in two. The "kendhang" usually plays in "kendhang kalih" style.
Ponikve is located on the western part of the () south of the (). It lies on the road from Idrija pri Bači to Pečine to Slap ob Idrijci. Ponikve includes the hamlets and isolated farms of Lazi, Ostrožnik, Penček, Pri Puhu, Rob, Rute, V Grapi, Zagomilca, Zapušnik, and Za Vrhom. The village core lies in a basin surrounded by the following hills: Oblačno Brdo (), Pušnik (), Zadnik (), Gasilca (), Križ (), and Lepa Gorica (). Penček Hill (, ) stands to the east, north of Penček. Intermittent Lake Rupa (surface area 0.12 ha, max. depth 2 m) lies north of the village. The lake is the source of an intermittent influent stream that disappears into a gorge at the end of the village, probably reemerging at Kresnica Cave above the hamlet of Potoka near Slap ob Idrijci. In the eastern part of the village there is a small pond at Na Kalih northeast of Zagomilca, and Grahel Pond () lies on the extreme eastern edge of the village near Penček.
The Cham have their own mosques. In 1962 there were about 100 mosques in the country. At the end of the nineteenth century, the Muslims in Cambodia formed a unified community under the authority of four religious dignitaries—mupti, tuk kalih, raja kalik, and tvan pake. A council of notables in Cham villages consisted of one hakem and several katip, bilal, and labi. The four high dignitaries and the hakem were exempt from personal taxes, and they were invited to take part in major national ceremonies at the royal court. When Cambodia became independent, the Islamic community was placed under the control of a five-member council that represented the community in official functions and in contacts with other Islamic communities. Each Muslim community has a hakem who leads the community and the mosque, an imam who leads the prayers, and a bilal who calls the faithful to the daily prayers. The peninsula of Chrouy Changvar near Phnom Penh is considered the spiritual center of the Cham, and several high Muslim officials reside there. Each year some of the Cham go to study the Qur'an at Kelantan in Malaysia, and some go on to study in, or make a pilgrimage to, Mecca. According to figures from the late 1950s, about 7 percent of the Cham had completed the pilgrimage and could wear the fez or turban as a sign of their accomplishment.
The Cham have their own mosques. In 1962 there were about 100 mosques in the country. At the end of the nineteenth century, the Muslims in Cambodia formed a unified community under the authority of four religious dignitaries—mupti, tuk kalih, raja kalik, and tvan pake. A council of notables in Cham villages consisted of one hakem and several katip, bilal, and labi. The four high dignitaries and the hakem were exempt from personal taxes, and they were invited to take part in major national ceremonies at the royal court. When Cambodia became independent, the Islamic community was placed under the control of a five-member council that represented the community in official functions and in contacts with other Islamic communities. Each Muslim community has a hakem who leads the community and the mosque, an imam who leads the prayers, and a bilal who calls the faithful to the daily prayers. The peninsula of Chrouy Changvar near Phnom Penh is considered the spiritual center of the Cham, and several high Muslim officials reside there. Each year some of the Cham go to study the Qur'an at Kelantan in Malaysia, and some go on to study in, or make a pilgrimage to, Mecca. According to figures from the late 1950s, about seven percent of the Cham had completed the pilgrimage and could wear the fez or turban as a sign of their accomplishment.