Synonyms for kharijite or Related words with kharijite

kharijites              zaydi              qarmatians              qarmatian              qaysi              khurramites              qizilbash              shaybani              ikhwan              tayy              taghlib              wahhabis              sarbadars              khurasani              ghassanid              khojas              ghatafan              qays              hananu              hashshashin              alids              alid              khariji              ismailis              shammar              afaqi              zaydis              wahhabi              meccans              daylamite              druzes              urabi              junayd              ibadis              ishaqi              umayyads              tulayha              kilab              ghilzai              khawarij              numayr              zenata              zanj              hamdanids              ghazis              khurramite              khoja              mardavij              kalakani              daylamites             



Examples of "kharijite"
A number of Kharijite groups went extinct in the past:
Based on Kharijite poetry writings, scholar Ihsan Abbas finds three categories of focus among them:
Kharijite (literally, "those who seceded") is a general term embracing a variety of Muslim sects which, while originally supporting the Caliphate of Ali, later on fought against him and eventually succeeded in his martyrdom while he was praying in the mosque of Kufa. While there are few remaining Kharijite or Kharijite-related groups, the term is sometimes used to denote Muslims who refuse to compromise with those with whom they disagree.
Al-Tabari mentions that in 819 Abu Ishaq commanded a force sent against some Kharijite rebels. During this campaign, one of the Turkish "ghilmān" placed himself between a Kharijite lancer and the future caliph, shouting, "Recognize me!" (in Persian ""ashinas ma-ra""). To express his appreciation, Abu Ishaq on that same day granted this man the name Ashinas.
W. K. R. Hallam argues that Bayajidda represents a "folk personification" of the supporters of Abu Yazid, (a the tenth-century Kharijite Berber rebel), whose followers fled southwards from North Africa after Yazid's defeat by and death at the hands of Fatimids. According to this theory, the Hausa states would have been founded by Kharijite refugees in the tenth century CE.
In 879, however, the Abbasid government, in an effort to restore its control, replaced the succession of Tahglibi chieftains as governors of Mosul by a Turkish commander, Ishaq ibn Kundajiq. This prompted the defection of the Taghlib chiefs, including Hamdan ibn Hamdun, to the Kharijite rebels. Hamdan became a prominent leader in the rebellion; thus he is mentioned—with the Kharijite sobriquet of "al-Shari"—among the Kharijite and Arab tribal leaders in the great victory won by Ibn Kundajiq in April/May 881, when the rebel army was routed and pursued to Nisibis and Amid.
Kharijite (lit. "those who seceded") is a general term embracing a variety of Islamic sects which, while originally supporting the Caliphate of Ali, eventually rejected his legitimacy after he negotiated with Mu'awiya during the 7th Century Islamic civil war (First Fitna). Their complaint was that the Imam must be spiritually pure, whereas Ali's compromise with Mu'awiya was a compromise of his spiritual purity and therefore of his legitimacy as Imam or Caliph. While there are few remaining Kharijite or Kharijite-related groups, the term is sometimes used to denote Muslims who refuse to compromise with those with whom they disagree.
By this era, though not organized as states, many areas were ruled by Kharijite rebels such as Djerba, Wargla, Setif, Tozeur, Gafsa and the Djebel Nafusa.
The Kharijite Muslims, who are less known, have their own stronghold in the country of Oman holding about 75% of the population.
Ali was later killed by a Kharijite named Abd-al-Rahman ibn Muljam while he was praying in the mosque of Kufa.
Abû 'Abdi Llâh 'Ikrimah Ibn 'Abdi Llâh () was a famous Sunni jurist, translator of the Quran and distributor of Hadiths. Who became a Kharijite.
The Rustamid dynasty, "developed a cosmopolitan reputation in which Christians, non-Kharijite Muslims, and adherents of different sects of Kharijism lived".
Al-Tabari mentions that in 819 Abu Ishaq commanded a force sent against some Kharijite rebels. During this campaign, one of the Turkish "ghilmān" placed himself between a Kharijite lancer and the future caliph, shouting, "Recognize me!" (in Persian ""ashinas ma-ra""). To express his appreciation, Abu Ishaq on that same day granted this man the name "Ashinas". Ashinas played a leading role under al-Mu'tasim.
The Kharijite Rebellion was a major Kharijite uprising against the Abbasid Caliphate between 866 and 896. Centered in the districts of Mosul and Diyar Rabi'a in the province of al-Jazira (upper Mesopotamia), the rebellion lasted for approximately thirty years, despite numerous attempts by both the central government and provincial authorities to quell it. It was finally defeated in 896 after the caliph al-Mu'tadid (r. 892–902) undertook several campaigns to restore caliphal authority in the region.
Ali was assassinated by Ibn Muljam, a Kharijite from Egypt, at the Great Mosque of Kufa, located in Kufa, Iraq, on 26 January 661. Ibn Muljam was of Himyar paternally but was counted among the Murad due to his maternal kinship, and allied with the Banii Jabala of Kindah. He had entered Kufa with the aim of killing Ali to avenge the Kharijite leaders at al-Nahrawan.
Al-Harith's governorship was brief. He was soon challenged by a local Kharijite, Muhammad ibn Wasil. The two sides engaged each other in battle and al-Harith was killed; Muhammad then seized control of Fars.
The Najdat were the sub-sect of the Kharijite movement that followed Najda ibn 'Amir al-Hanafi in the late 7th century and briefly ruled over the historical provinces of Yamamah and Bahrayn in central and eastern Arabia.
Al-Walid ibn Tarif al-Shaybani () was an eighth-century Kharijite leader. In 794 he launched a rebellion against the Abbasid Caliphate, but was defeated and killed in 795.
Aḍ-Ḍaḥāk ibn Qays al-Shaybānī () was the leader of a widespread but unsuccessful Kharijite rebellion in Iraq against the Umayyad Caliph Marwan II from 745 until his death in battle in 746.
The Ibadi Revolt was an Ibadi Kharijite uprising that occurred in ca. 747–748 against the Umayyad Caliphate. It established the first Ibadi imamate, a short-lived state located in the Arabian Peninsula.