Synonyms for khrims or Related words with khrims

tshul              rgyas              dbang              bstan              rgya              mchog              brgyad              bkra              mtsho              thub              bzang              mkhyen              phyug              rgyal              mkhar              nyid              khri              gling              ldan              btsun              lcang              dkon              btsan              khedrup              gsang              shis              rgyan              gyur              gnyis              gzhung              tshig              gunu              phur              mkhas              rgyud              mdzod              brtan              gyatsho              snang              byams              gtsug              sgrub              snying              bzhin              phrul              gter              srong              gelek              ngag              bshes             



Examples of "khrims"
182b–183a To. 3164: Trailokavaśaṃkaralokeśvarasādana (trans: Abhaya, tshul khrims rgyal mtshan)
Later histories record that both Songtsen Gampo and Trisong Detsen (756–797) founded temples at Yerpa, and Klu-mes Tshul-khrims did some refurbishing in the 11th century.
There are two translations of the "Vimalakīrti Nirdeśa Sūtra" from the original Sanskrit into the Tibetan language. Chos-nyid-tshul-khrims translated it into Tibetan in the ninth century.
In the sacred Chamber on the west, the statues of Mahakala (protectress deity of the monastery), statue of the founder of the monastery, statue of the second incarnate, Gnas-Bstan Tsual–Khrims Dorji and a Stupa are located. Each row in this chamber has the idols of the two head lamas.
The Bhutanese Royal Court of Justice (Dzongkha: དཔལ་ལྡན་འབྲུག་པའི་དྲང་ཁྲིམས་ལྷན་སྡེ་; Wylie "Dpal-ldan 'Brug-pai Drang-khrims Lhan-sde"; Palden Drukpa Drangkhrim Lhende) is the government body which oversees the judicial system of Bhutan. Senior Judges of the courts are appointed by the monarch. Bhutan's legal system is influenced by English common law. The Royal Court of Justice is based in the capital Thimphu.
The "Seminal Heart" belongs to the "Instruction series." The main texts of the instruction series are the so-called seventeen tantras and the two "seminal heart" collections, namely the "bi ma snying thig" ("Vima Nyingthig", "Seminal Heart of Vimalamitra") and the "mkha' 'gro snying thig" ("Khandro nyingthig", "Seminal Heart of the Dakini"). The "Seminal Heart of Vimalamitra" is attributed to Vimalamitra, but was largely composed by their discoverers, in the 11th and 12th century. The "Seminal Heart of the Dakini" was produced by Tsultrim Dorje ("Tshul khrims rdo rje")(1291-1315/17).
The Tobacco Control Act of Bhutan (Dzongkha: འབྲུག་གི་ཏམ་ཁུ་དམ་འཛིན་བཅའ་ཁྲིམས་ཅན་མ་; Wylie:" 'brug-gi tam-khu dam-'dzin bca'-khrims can-ma") was enacted by parliament on 16 June 2010. It regulates tobacco and tobacco products, banning the cultivation, harvesting, production, and sale of tobacco and tobacco products in Bhutan. The act also mandates that the government of Bhutan provide counselling and treatment to facilitate tobacco cessation. Premised on the physical health and well being of the Bhutanese people – important elements of Gross National Happiness – the Tobacco Control Act recognizes the harmful effects of tobacco consumption and exposure to tobacco smoke on both spiritual and social health.
Translator Burton Watson argues that the "Vimalakīrti Nirdeśa Sūtra" was likely composed in approximately 100 CE. Although lost for centuries, a version in the original Sanskrit has recently been recovered amongst the Chinese government's Potala collection in Tibet. It was translated into Chinese several times, the first being produced in 188 CE. This translation was made by the Kuṣāṇa monk Lokakṣema, who came to China from the kingdom of Gandhāra. The sūtra was translated six more times at later dates, with two especially influential translations are the Kumārajīva version (406 CE), which is the most widely used, and the Xuanzang version (650 CE). Chos-nyid-tshul-khrims also translated it into Tibetan in the early 8th century. Most Japanese versions are based on the Chinese "Kumarajiva" version. The Nagarjuna Institute of Exact Methods then made available in 2007 a Romanized Sanskrit version of what was named as "Āryavimalakīrtinirdeśo Nāma Mahāyānasūtram".
History of the hermitage is traced to the 9th century when Padmasambhava ("Padma ’byung gnas") meditated here. The main cave where he did penance is known as the ‘Cavern of Dochung Chongzhi ("Rdo cung cong zhi’i phug pa")’. Over the centuries, the monastery has seen many leading lights of the Tibetan monastic order playing a role in its building, such as the Zhang ’gro ba’i mgon po g.yu brag pa (1123–1193), female saint Ma cig lab sgron, Sgrub khang dge legs rgya mtsho’s (1641–1713), Ngawang Jampa (Phur lcog sku phreng dang po ngag dbang byams pa, 1682–1762) and Pan chen blo bzang ye shes (1663–1737). Royal family members like the Queen Tsering Trashi ("Rgyal mo tshe ring bkra shis") and the Tibetan King Pho lha nas (1689–1747) also supported the activities of the hermitage. However, the most significant face of development occurred during the third Purchok incarnation Lozang Tsültrim Jampa Gyatso (Phur lcog sku phreng gsum pa blo bzang tshul khrims byams pa rgya mtsho) who was teacher of the 13th and 14th Dalai Lamas.
Central rule was largely nonexistent over the Tibetan region from 842 to 1247. According to traditional accounts, Buddhism had survived surreptitiously in the region of Kham. During the reign of Langdarma three monks had escaped from the troubled region of Lhasa to the region of Mt. Dantig in Amdo. Their disciple Muzu Saelbar ("Mu-zu gSal-'bar"), later known as the scholar Gongpa Rabsal ("bla chen dgongs pa rab gsal") (832–915), was responsible for the renewal of Buddhism in northeastern Tibet, and is counted as the progenitor of the Nyingma ("Rnying ma pa") school of Tibetan Buddhism. Meanwhile, according to tradition, one of Ösung's descendants, who had an estate near Samye, sent ten young men to be trained by Gongpa Rabsal. Among the ten was Lume Sherab Tshulthrim ("Klu-mes Shes-rab Tshul-khrims") (950–1015). Once trained, these young men were ordained to go back into the central Tibetan regions of Ü and Tsang. The young scholars were able to link up with Atiśa shortly after 1042 and advance the spread and organization of Buddhism in Lho-kha. In that region, the faith eventually coalesced again, with the foundation of the Sakya Monastery in 1073. Over the next two centuries, the Sakya monastery grew to a position of prominence in Tibetan life and culture. The Tsurphu Monastery, home of the Karmapa school of Buddhism, was founded in 1155.
The earliest history of the hermitage is traced to the ninth century when Padmasambhava ("Padma ’byung gnas") meditated here. The main cave where he did penance is known as the ‘Cavern of Dochung Chongzhi ("Rdo cung cong zhi’i phug pa")'. However, it was in the twelfth century that the founder of the Tshalpa Kagyu school, Zhang Drowé Gönpo Yudrakpa (1123-1193), founded a practice centre here. Thereafter, this location has been known as 'Purchok' (literal meaning), “a dagger at its pinnacle”. Over the centuries, the monastery has seen many eminent monastic officials playing a role in its building, such as the Zhang ’gro ba’i mgon po g.yu brag pa (1123–1193), female saint Ma cig lab sgron, Sgrub khang dge legs rgya mtsho’s (1641–1713), Ngawang Jampa (Phur lcog sku phreng dang po ngag dbang byams pa, 1682–1762) and Pan chen blo bzang ye shes (1663–1737). Royal family members like the Queen Tsering Trashi ("Rgyal mo tshe ring bkra shis") and the King of Tibet Pho lha nas (1689–1747) also supported the activities of the hermitage. However, the most significant face of development occurred during the third Purchok incarnation Lozang Tsültrim Jampa Gyatso ("Phur lcog sku phreng gsum pa blo bzang tshul khrims byams pa rgya mtsho") who was teacher of the 13th and 14th Dalai Lamas.