Synonyms for kilcornan or Related words with kilcornan

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Examples of "kilcornan"
Kilcornan is located 2.5 km (1½ mile) northeast of Athenry.
Kilcornan is an abandoned village and National Monument located in County Galway, Ireland.
The townlands are Cloonmunnia, Cragroe, Drumullan, Kilcornan, Kilkishen, Kilkishen Demesne, Kilmurry, Knocknalappa, Rosroe, Shandangan East and Shandangan West.
Kilcornan was abandoned around the late 18th century. The field layouts and walls are clearly visible on aerial photographs.
Kilcornan () is a civil parish in County Limerick. It is about seventeen kilometres west of Limerick city on the N69. According to the 2011 census of Ireland the population of Kilcornan was 749, an increase of 11.6% since 2006. There is a Catholic church and a National School on the main road as well as a public house. Apart from Curraghchase, the ancestral home of the Victorian Poet Aubrey de Vere the next most visited tourism site in Kilcornan is the Stonehall Visitor Park. There is also a noted go kart track. It is located across the River Shannon from Shannon Airport, County Clare.
Lewis's Topographical Dictionary notes that the earliest identifiable settlements in Kilcornan were Danish. The lands changed hands several times during the Tudor era. A large part of the parish was granted to Hardress Waller, one of Cromwell's generals. Curraghchase, the ancestral home of Aubrey de Vere is in Kilcornan. The parish was known as Stonehall until 1961 when under Canon Bluet it changed names to Kilcornan. In 1551 the rector of the parish, William Casey, was nominated by James, the Earl of Desmond to be the first non-Catholic bishop of Limerick.
On 30 August 1842 he married Anne Eliza Mary, eldest daughter and coheiress of John Hyacinth Talbot, M.P., of Talbot Hall, County Wexford. He resided at Kilcornan House, but he died in London on 11 Oct. 1862.
Legend has it that when St. Patrick introduced Christianity to Ireland there was anger amongst the Tuatha Dé Danann. They decided to magically turn themselves into horses and galloped to Kilcornan, where they hid out in the Kilcornan Caves. As time went by there was no sign of the legendary Tuatha Dé Danann until one day seven foals emerged from the caves. They were frightened by the bright light of day and galloped along the edge of the Cliffs of Moher in fear. Legend says they galloped straight over the cliffs at the point known as "Aill na Searrach" (anglicised as "Aillenasharragh"), which is the Irish for "Leap of the Foals".
In 2001 Desmonds who were Askeaton/Ballysteen and Kilcornan lost both the football and hurling county premier minor finals. Desmonds won the 2003 West u21 Premier football final against Newcastlewest and defeated Pallasgreen in the county final. Desmonds won the 2005 West under 21 A hurling championship when they defeated Granagh Ballingarry.
Cappagh () is a small parish in West Limerick, Ireland. It is surrounded by the parishes of Askeaton and Kilcornan (to the north), Rathkeale (south), Croagh (East) and Coolcappa (West). The patron saint of the parish is St. James. The parish was previously known as Connellow and Nantenan.
We began the year in tremendous form & playing an outstanding brand of football we won 6 games out of 6 in the West Championship, running out comfortable victors against Newcastle West (8 points), Feenagh-Kilmeedy (8 points), Fr. Casey's (6 points), Monagea (11 points), Granagh-Ballingarry (8 points) & Cappagh-Kilcornan (11 points).
Askeaton, Kilcornan and Kildimo Pallaskenry combined to form a senior hurling team in 1966 and they were called Shannon Gaels. They were defeated on their Senior hurling championship debut by a strong Old Christians team on the scoreline of 5-9 to 2-5.
Townlands are Ardnacullia North, Arcnacullia South, Attycristora, Ballingaddy East, Ballingaddy West, Calluragh East, Calluragh South, Calluragh West, Carrowgar, Carrowntedaun, Castlequarter, Cloonaveige, Clooncoul, Clooneybreen, Crag, Deerpark Lower, Deerpark Middle, Deerpark Upper, Deerpark West, Ennistimon, Fahanlunaghta Beg, Fahanlunaghta More, Furraglaun, Glebe, Gortnaclohy, Kilcornan, Knockbrack, Knockpatrick, Lehinch, Lissatunna, Maghera, Rinneen, Shanbally, Sroohil, Tullygarvan East, Tullygarvan West and Woodmount.
County Westmeath: Aghafin, Aghanapisha, Ardnacrany North, Ardnacrany South, Ballynalone, Bawn, Brackagh, Cannorstown (Chapman), Cannorstown (Hogan), Carrick, Cartron, Cartroncroy, Cloghannagarragh, Clogher, Clonkeen, Coolaleena, Coolvin, Corbrack, Corlis, Creggan, Creggy, Doonamona, Doonis, Gortmore, Inchbofin, Inchturk, Kilcornan, Kippin, Lecade, Lisdossan, Lissaquill, Lissoy, Maghera, Muckanagh, Nicholastown, Noughaval, Rath Lower, Rath Upper, Ross, Streamstown and Tonlegee.
Formerly Rector of Kilcornan, he was nominated Bishop of Limerick by King Edward VI on 6 July 1551 and consecrated at Dublin on 25 October 1551. He was deprived by Queen Mary I in 1556 and restored by Queen Elizabeth I on 8 May 1571. He died on 7 February 1591.
Drumraney civil parish comprises the village of Drumraney and 40 townlands: Ardborra, Ardbuckan, Ardnagragh, Ardnagragh Digby, Ardnagragh Gray, Ballycloghduff, Ballycloghduff (Molston), Ballynalone, Ballysallagh, Baskin High, Baskin Low, Bleachlawn, Bryanmore Lower, Bryanmore Upper, Byanbeg Lower, Byanbeg Upper, Carrickaneha, Cartroncoragh, Cauran, Cloghbreen, Cormaclew, Corr, Curraghbane, Curraghroodle, Drumraney, Dunnamona, Fairfield, Fearmore, Fearmore, Kilcornan, Killeennanam, Killininneen, Kiltober, Lissanode, Newgrove, Oldtown or Puddingstreet, Pishanagh, Streamstown, Toorbeg and Walderstown.
Redington, only son of Christopher Talbot Redington (1780–1825), a captain in the army, by Frances, only daughter of Henry Dowell of Cadiz, was born at Kilcornan, Oranmore, County Galway. He was educated at Oscott College and at Christ's College, Cambridge, but as a Roman Catholic was not eligible to graduate with a degree. Devoting himself to politics, he represented Dundalk in parliament in the Liberal interest from 1837 to 1846.
We were playing the best football we had played in years and entered the West semi final full of confidence against Cappagh-Kilcornan but although leading by 7 points at one stage we only just scraped over the line by a point at the end. This provided the wake up call we needed & we won the West final against Fr. Casey's comfortably by 2-12:0-07.
Born in Groombridge, Kent, and descendant of Sir Richard Waller of Groombridge Place. As an MP, Waller was knighted by Charles I in 1629. That same year he married Elizabeth Dowdall, the daughter of an English landowner in Ireland and acquired a large estate in Castletown, Kilcornan, County Limerick which the family held until the 19th Century Irish Land Acts. He gained military experience in serving against the rebels in Ireland, where in 1644 he was made Governor of Cork.
Askeaton fielded two Adult hurling teams from the late 1990s and the Junior B hurling team was very competitive for many years providing the odd shock in West Junior Leagues and Championships. The Bees finest hour however was when they defeated near neighbours Kilcornan to annex the 2003 Pallas Tournament Cup. Captain Clem Hewson lifted the Cup on the night. The Askeaton Junior B hurling team disbanded in 2012.